Printer Friendly

AUDUBON ASKS INDEPENDENT SCIENCE PANEL TO HELP RESOLVE EVERGLADES RESTORATION, ENDANGERED SPECIES CONFLICTS

 AUDUBON ASKS INDEPENDENT SCIENCE PANEL TO HELP RESOLVE EVERGLADES
 RESTORATION, ENDANGERED SPECIES CONFLICTS
 KEY LARGO, Fla., Jan. 9 /PRNewswire/ -- The National Audubon Society has asked a panel of independent scientists to look for ways to resolve conflicts between Everglades restoration work and the survival of several endangered and threatened species.
 Audubon President Peter A.A. Berle, in prepared remarks to the Everglades Coalition meeting in Key Largo this weekend, described the work of the panel of scientists. He also outlined Audubon's priorities on which the society will push for action to help restore and protect the Everglades ecosystem which covers much of south Florida. These actions include:
 -- Securing completion of acquisition by the federal and state governments of three key areas now outside the Everglades National Park but crucial to its ecological survival. These areas are East Everglades, Big Cypress and Fakahatchee Strand;
 -- Stopping the discharge of polluted water from the Everglades Agricultural Area, south of Lake Okeechobee, to public lands, including Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge;
 -- Development of a new federal Wetlands Delineation Manual that would help protect wetlands, not lead to their destruction. National Audubon has been in the forefront of the nationwide protest arising from the federal government's proposed revised manual, which would eliminate protection for much of the Everglades wetlands ecosystem as well as many more of the nations' wetland ecosystems.
 Berle also urged the state and federal governments to take a comprehensive bioregional approach to remaking the south Florida water management system to protect and restore the Everglades ecosystem and the Florida Keys. Prime management responsibility lies with the South Florida Water Management District.
 The seven-member impartial science panel convened by Audubon is expected to issue its report in May, making recommendations designed to ensure that Everglades restoration work can be done in a way that will minimize negative impacts on endangered and threatened species.
 The concern that sparked the panel's formation was the fate of the endangered Snail Kite. Two federal agencies, the Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Parks Service, disagree over how to manage water flows through the East Everglades, stalling engineering design work by the Corps of Engineers. A prime goal of the science panel is to recommend how water flows can be restored while at the same time protecting species.
 In his prepared remarks Berle called for an end to piecemeal planning and water management in south Florida.
 "We must see this ecologically unique region for what it is and treat it in a comprehensive way, from the Kissimmee River through Lake Okeechobee to the Everglades National Park and the Florida Keys. Any lesser planning and management will result in the continued destruction of this vast wetland resource," he said.
 "In Florida, we have an excellent opportunity to set a national and global example -- how to undo the short-sighted water management schemes of the past and restore natural water flows, while protecting, even improving, the quality of life for the millions of people who come to Florida to enjoy its environment," Berle said.
 The Everglades ecosystem is critically important to the region's wildlife and plays a vital role in supporting Florida's commercial and recreational fisheries, and Everglades water is important for urban and agricultural uses.
 Half the Everglades have been lost to agriculture and urban and suburban development. Canals, levees and pumps have disrupted the natural sheet flow of water and devastated wetland ecosystems and wildlife throughout the region.
 "Audubon has been a major player in the Everglades since we were founded, from initial efforts to stop the slaughter of wading birds for the plume trade, to the political efforts to establish Everglades National Park, and through our 52 years of conservation-based science research by staff scientists here.
 "Audubon scientists have been major players in recent symposia on Everglades restoration. They have helped develop data bases and computer models to evaluate alternative restoration schemes," Berle said.
 Audubon's scientific research will continue, Berle said, and so also will Audubon's leadership in the political arena to promote restoration on an ecosystem-wide scale
 -0- 1/9/92
 /CONTACT: Graham Cox of National Audubon Society, 212-546-9200/ CO: National Audubon Society ST: Florida IN: SU:


CK-LM -- NY065 -- 8360 01/09/92 15:58 EST
COPYRIGHT 1992 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Jan 9, 1992
Words:699
Previous Article:CHEMICAL REPORTS 1991 EARNINGS OF $154 MILLION AFTER $625 MILLION MERGER-RELATED RESTRUCTURING CHARGE
Next Article:REICHHOLD PRESIDENT AND CEO ANNOUNCES RETIREMENT


Related Articles
GRUEN TO LAUNCH ENDANGERED SPECIES WATCH COLLECTION AT BLOOMINGDALE'S; TO MAKE DONATION TO NATIONAL AUDUBON SOCIETY FOR EVERY U.S. WATCH SOLD
ADMINISTRATION'S PROPOSED BUDGET REFLECTS INCREASED COMMITMENT TO WILDLIFE CONSERVATION
Recovery proceeds for Everglades, panthers.
ERRATUM TO 'CORPORATE WELFARE TO SUGAR INDUSTRY THREATENS SO. FLA. JOBS' PRESS RELEASE OF JULY 1995
MAKING AMENDS.
Endangered African Wildcat Clones Produce Kittens; Audubon Nature Institute of New Orleans Announces Unprecedented Births.
Code pink: the decline of the roseate spoonbill, an everglades icon, could signal an ecosystem collapse.
Restoring the Everglades: a major effort is under way to heal Florida's ailing "River of Grass".

Terms of use | Copyright © 2017 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters