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AT&T ANNOUNCES CONTRACT WITH IOFFE INSTITUTE IN RUSSIA

 AT&T ANNOUNCES CONTRACT WITH IOFFE INSTITUTE IN RUSSIA
 /ADVANCE/ MURRAY HILL, N.J., Oct. 19 /PRNewswire/ -- AT&T Bell


Laboratories today announced a contract with the A. F. Ioffe Physico- Technical Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia, for the services of 27 scientists working in four research teams there.
 They will conduct fundamental research into semiconductor physics and semiconductor lasers. The one-year contract is renewable by mutual agreement.
 "The Ioffe Institute is one of the world's premier research institutions for semiconductor physics and lasers," said David V. Lang, director of Bell Labs Compound Semiconductor Device Research Laboratory.
 Lang negotiated the contract and will oversee the work of the Russian scientists.
 Kumar Patel, executive director of the Materials Science Research division, commented, "Like our earlier contract with the General Physics Institute (GPI) in Moscow, this is a mutually beneficial agreement, with world-class Russian researchers doing leading-edge work in cooperation with their scientific colleagues at Bell Labs."
 He added, "The optical-fiber research activity contained in the GPI agreement and the semiconductor device activity contained in this agreement are important underpinnings for lightwave communications."
 The AT&T/Ioffe agreement covers basic research into:
 -- auger recombination (a type of energy-loss mechanism in a semiconductor that does not result in emission of light) in heterostructures.
 -- photoluminescence of hot (energetic) electrons and scattering processes in quantum-well structures (very thin heterostructures).
 -- radiative efficiency dependence on quantum-well thickness for various types of heterostructures grown by molecular-beam epitaxy and metal-organic chemical-vapor deposition techniques.
 -- the study of optical properties of quantum wires and quantum dots fabricated by reactive ion etching of aluminum-gallium-arsenide/gallium arsenide heterostructures.
 "This research is an extension of work already being done at the Ioffe Institute," said Lang. "It complements our own and will involve studies of semiconductor crystal specimens fabricated at Bell Labs."
 Fiber-optic technology, which offers ultra-high-capacity information transfer (for simultaneous transmission of voice, data and images, and for high-definition television transmission and high-speed data networks), depends on lasers and other semiconductor devices.
 "The expansion of fiber optics -- in the U.S. and around the world -- requires low-cost devices," said Lang. "And fundamental research underlies the development of such devices."
 Bell Labs, often cited as the world's premier industrial R&D institution, is renowned for its work in optics. It is the research and development arm of AT&T.
 It launched the laser industry with publication of the 1958 scientific paper describing the concept of a "light-emitting maser" by Nobel Laureates Arthur Schawlow and Charles Townes. Both worked for Bell Labs at the time, Schawlow as a scientist and Townes as a consultant.
 Other notable Bell Labs laser achievements include the invention of the first continuously operating laser, in 1960; first continuously operating solid-state laser, 1961; first high-power carbon-dioxide laser, 1964; first semiconductor laser that operates at room temperature (which set the basic principle for all semiconductor lasers used today), 1971; first single-frequency laser (used in the long-distance network and, more recently, in CATV systems), 1971; the first laser capable of generating solitons (ultra-short pulses that maintain their shape over long distances), 1983.
 More recent Bell Labs laser innovations include microlasers (more than a million on a chip), 1989; world's fastest lasers (able to switch on or off 350 billion times a second), 1991; world's smallest lasers (more than 10,000 fit easily on the head of a pin), 1992.
 The Ioffe Institute, founded in 1919, was the first non-university research institute in the world specializing totally in physics. It was the seed of the entire Soviet physics establishment, which has won numerous Nobel Prizes and has been widely regarded as one of the best in the world.
 In the late 1950s, the Institute pioneered the study of III-V semiconductors, such as gallium-arsenide and indium-phosphide, which now play a key role in optoelectronics.
 In 1968, the first double heterostructure laser was demonstrated. This is the basic design of all current semiconductor lasers. Subsequent work at the Ioffe Institute has centered on ultra-high power semiconductor lasers and semiconductor physics.
 -0- 10/20/92
 /CONTACT: Donna C. Cunnigham of AT&T, 802-482-3748, or home, 802-482-2933/ CO: AT&T Bell Laboratories; A. F. Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute ST: New Jersey IN: TLS SU: CON


GK-AH -- NY005 -- 1381 10/19/92 09:01 EDT
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Date:Oct 19, 1992
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