Printer Friendly

AT&T: HEADING SOUTH WITH NAFTA: HOW TO GET ORIENTED IN MEXICO

 LAS VEGAS, Nev., April 27 /PRNewswire/ -- As the possibility of a North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) firms up and the pace of business between the U.S. and Mexico picks up, more and more Americans are heading south. Some 1.5 million Americans visited Mexico in 1991, according to the Direction General de Politica Turistica. That's more than any other state -- including Texas, which used to hold the top spot.
 Given California's proximity to Mexico, the state has much to gain from its neighbor under NAFTA. Many business owners find it's the right time to embark on a trip to Mexico. If you're scouting out new frontiers for your products and services in Mexico, here are some pointers from AT&T on communicating while you're there and the resources available to you:
 Phoning Home
 To avoid language barriers when making calls home, some long distance carriers have set up services that will connect you to English- speaking operators. AT&T USADirect Service is available from virtually every phone in Mexico, making it easier and faster to place calls to the United States. To use the service from Mexico, simply dial 95-800-462-4240. Calls may be placed collect or charged to the AT&T Calling Card, Universal Card and local exchange company cards. For a free wallet card with dialing instructions and access codes for 123 countries, call 1-800-331-1140, ext. 100.
 Se Habla Espanol?
 If you don't feel comfortable with your level of Spanish and want to avoid mixed signals during business exchanges, you may want to call a live interpreter. With AT&T Language Line Services, you can get language assistance during a telephone call or face-to-face meeting. To access Language Line, call USADirect (see above) and ask the AT&T operator to connect you to a Spanish interpreter. The language service costs $3.50 a minute for interpreter time, with a separate service charge for USADirect.
 Exploring Exports
 To explore export markets in Mexico, a nationwide information service is available for U.S. firms. Export Hotline, primarily funded by AT&T, can be accessed by any phone user with a fax machine. Callers use the handset on a fax machine to request trade reports from a computerized database and have the reports delivered by fax on the same phone call. A new section has been added on NAFTA. The service operates 24 hours a day and is free, except for the cost of the phone call to retrieve a report. To register in the United States, call toll- free 1-800-USA-XPORT.
 Here are some more tips on conducting business in Mexico, from "Opportunity in Mexico: A Small Business Guide," by John L. Manzella of Free Trade Consultants, based in Buffalo, N.Y.:
 Dinero That Talks
 Because of the influx of so many Americans, Mexicans are familiar with U.S. travelers and currency. All major U.S. credit cards are accepted in most business and tourist areas. For better exchange rates, visit a Mexican bank or casas de cambio (exchange house), or stop at the Mexican airport.
 Telling Time -- Or Timing That Tells
 While the U.S. business community generally understands time in terms of opportunities gained or lost (i.e., time is money), a different attitude exists in Mexico. Mexicans are more flexible in their use of time. Day-to-day punctuality is not a priority. Delays are frequent. Out of courtesy, for example, a Mexican business person may be reluctant to terminate a previous meeting in order to begin the next meeting on time.
 Mexican business managers spend considerable time developing business relationships. Americans conducting business in Mexico should expect that relatively less time will actually be spent on business matters; more will be spent on getting to know each other. A trusted friend may be more likely to win a contract than an unknown lower bidder.
 The Mexican Power Lunch
 Unlike our old two-martini lunch, the Mexican power lunch is a three- to four-hour event that may include two martinis, wine, cognac, a several-course meal and a heavy dessert. This afternoon tradition, most prevalent in Mexico City, usually begins at 3 p.m. and may go well into the evening, depending on when you get around to business and its importance.
 For More information
 For domestic firms interested in exporting, a 220-page guide, "Opportunity in Mexico: A Small Business Guide," is available for free through the U.S. Small Business Administration, which co-sponsored the book with the Service Corps of Retired Executives and AT&T. The guide describes the current economic and political climate in Mexico, the potential impact of NAFTA and the best market prospects in Mexico for U.S. goods. For a free copy, contact the nearest SBA district office listed in the government section of the telephone directory.
 -0- 4/27/93
 /CONTACT: Shirley Chan of AT&T, 415-442-2219, or, home, 415-923-0904/


CO: AT&T ST: Nevada IN: TLS SU:

ML-TM -- SF008 -- 1427 04/27/93 13:12 EDT
COPYRIGHT 1993 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1993 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Apr 27, 1993
Words:822
Previous Article:BOEING REPORTS 1993 FIRST-QUARTER RESULTS
Next Article:HEALTHDYNE ANNOUNCES FIRST QUARTER RESULTS
Topics:


Related Articles
NALCO CHEMICAL TO BENEFIT FROM NORTH AMERICAN FREE TRADE AGREEMENT
North American Free Trade Agreement: everybody wins.
NAFTA spawns a diverse union of critics: trade pact exploits labor, poor, they say.
NAFTA MEANS JOBS FOR AMERICAN AUTO WORKERS FORD EXECUTIVE SAYS
MERRILL LYNCH REPORT: NAFTA LIKELY TO BOOST ECONOMIES IN ALL U.S. REGIONS; TEXAS, CALIFORNIA, ARIZONA COULD BE AMONG BIGGEST BENEFICIARIES
Mexico's still a mess and NAFTA may not help.
Why support the North American Free Trade Agreement? Mexico is an extremely important market for U.S. exports.
NAFTA should be boon for Hispanic Americans.
Zoning in on tariff-free.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters