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ASSESSMENT OF MICRONUTRIENT LEVELS AND THEIR RELATIONSHIP WITH COMPONENTS OF METABOLIC SYNDROME IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS AND WITH OBESITY AND METABOLIC SYNDROME.

OP-18

Introduction: Obesity is an important public health issue in Turkey. In obesity caused by uniform nutrition, vitamin deficiencies can be seen in obesity when compared to healthy children. In this topic, there are studies on vitamin and mineral deficiencies, indicating discrepant results. In this study, we assessed vitamin and micronutrient levels in children and adolescents with obesity, metabolic syndrome, and healthy controls.

Material and method: The study included 61 patients with obesity, 51 patients with metabolic syndrome and 59 healthy controls aged 10-16 years. Obesity was defined by using BMI percentiles adjusted to age and gender in CDC 2000. The children with BMI[greater than or equal to]95th percentile were considered as obese. The 10-16 year-old group was included in the metabolic syndrome group who met IDF diagnostic criteria. The children without known chronic disease who had height and body weight values within normal range were employed as controls. In all subjects, physical examination and pubertal assessment were performed. In addition, waist circumference and systolic blood pressure measurements were performed. BMI and relative index (RI) were calculated and recorded. In all subjects, fasting blood glucose, triglyceride, HDL, LDL, total cholesterol, insulin, vitamin A, vitamin E, vitamin B1, vitamin B2, vitamin B12, folic acid and free carnitine levels were studied. HOMA-IR index was calculated.

Results: The study included 61 children diagnosed as obesity, 51 children diagnosed as metabolic syndrome and 59 healthy controls. Mean age was 11.8[+ or -]2.1 years. Mean body weight, height and waist circumference were 58,9[+ or -]24 kg, 149,9[+ or -]14,5 cm and range 79,2[+ or -]13,7 cm respectively. Mean BMI was calculated as 25,2[+ or -]6,6 kg/m2. Mean triglyceride and LDL levels were found to be significantly higher in children with metabolic syndrome. Mean HDL level was found to be significantly lower in children with metabolic syndrome. Serum insulin level and HOMA-IR values were found to be significantly higher in obese children and in those with metabolic syndrome. No significant differences were found in vitamin A, vitamin B6 and free carnitine levels among groups. Mean vitamin E, vitamin B2, vitamin B12 and folic acid levels were found to be significantly lower in obese children and in those with metabolic syndrome. Mean vitamin B1 level was found to be significantly higher in obese children and in those with metabolic syndrome when compared to healthy controls.

Conclusion: Obesity as a result of monotype nutrition, may cause vitamin deficiencies like our study in proportion to healthy children. Curtail step healthcare organizations must be interested for routine physical examinations, nutrition training, psychological counseling for children with obesity and metabolic syndrome.

Fatih Kardas (1), Arife Derda Yucel (2), Selim Kurtoglu (3), Leyla Akin (3), Nihal Hatipoglu (3), Ulku Gul (3), Songul Gokay (1), Mustafa Kendirci (1)

(1) Division of Pediatric Nutrition and Metabolism, Erciyes University School of Medicine, Kayseri, Turkey

(2) Department of Pediatrics, Erciyes University School of Medicine, Kayseri, Turkey

(3) Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Erciyes University School of Medicine, Kayseri, Turkey

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Title Annotation:Oral Posters
Author:Kardas, Fatih; Yucel, Arife Derda; Kurtoglu, Selim; Akin, Leyla; Hatipoglu, Nihal; Gul, Ulku; Gokay,
Publication:Erciyes Medical Journal
Article Type:Report
Geographic Code:7TURK
Date:Mar 1, 2017
Words:504
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