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ASME position paper on standards and technical barriers to trade.

The Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT)(1) recognizes the growing impact of standards on global commerce and the potential for standards to either facilitate or impede international trade. The TBT Agreement, in promoting the use of international standards, has generated different opinions among governments and standards bodies regarding the nature of technical regulations and standards and the obligations of signatory governments. The U.S. response, and any other nation's response, to the TBT Agreement should not compromise that nation's commitment to the promulgation of technical standards, which ensure high quality and safety of manufactured products. Further, the true test of an international standard is fair and open access to the standards development process and its record of success in meeting international market and safety needs.

Introduction

The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), also known as ASME International, is a nonprofit engineering Society focused on technical, educational, and research issues. There are 125,000 ASME members worldwide; there are no corporate members. ASME conducts one of the world's largest technical publishing operations, holds some 30 technical conferences and 200 professional development courses each year, and sets industrial and manufacturing codes and standards used throughout the world; there are ASME accredited manufacturers in 57 countries.

ASME supports the concepts of free and equitable access to international markets. The conclusion of the Uruguay Round of the GATT negotiations and the subsequent formation of the WorldTrade Organization (WTO) provide the framework for further rationalization of international markets, with attendant benefits to all WTO members and their citizens. ASME subscribes to the underlying beneficial principle stated in the Preamble of the Agreement establishing the WTO, which calls on members to conduct their trade relations in a manner that will "raise standards of living, ensuring full employment and a large and steadily growing volume of real income and effective demand, and expanding the production of and trade in goods and services, while allowing for the optimal use of the world's resources in accordance with the objective of sustainable development, seeking both to protect and preserve the environment and to enhance the means for doing so in a manner consistent with their respective needs and concerns at different levels of development."

The impact of standards on international trade and competition and the existing sectoral differences are articulated in the October 1996 National Export Strategy report to the U.S. Congress(2). In this report, Ambassador Stuart E. Eizenstat is quoted with: "As a long term solution, we need to move toward globally harmonized standards and mutual recognition in key areas where industry has indicated that this will help." ASME supports this concept.

As a major standards developing organization (SDO), ASME has a leadership role for the United States in ensuring that the promise of the WTO is realized. ASME stands ready to contribute to U.S. efforts to cooperate with cognizant government and private bodies. ASME has extensive experience in the development and management of product and safety standards, as well as administering a successful international accreditation program.

Position

ASME believes the U.S. position should be consistent with the following:

* Mechanisms promoting free trade must incorporate commit-merit to technical excellence and public safety.

* Elimination of technical barriers to trade should be based on objective tests of achievement and acceptance in the global market.

* "International standard" should not be construed as synonymous with ISO(3) standard.

* Harmonization of standards should be addressed on a sectoral basis.(4)

* Intellectual property rights in standards must be protected.

Discussion

For technical standards to facilitate international trade, several conditions must be satisfied. The scope and content of the standard must adequately address a defined need and at the same time incorporate appropriate safety provisions. The Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) gives preference to performance-based technical regulations; ASME supports this position, noting that at the standards level, more prescriptive provisions are often appropriate, when consented to by affected parties.

The SDO procedures should provide for technical consensus of affected parties. This is a significant point upon which there continues to be widespread misunderstanding. The TBT Agreement tacitly assumes that ISO standards are based on consensus (see TBT Agreement Annex 1, definition of "Standard"). The current ISO standards development system, however, does not conform to the accepted U.S. definition of a consensus process. The ISO process does not ensure adequate technical consensus. There are no provisions for ensuring fair opportunity of representation across the full range of affected interests. In the end, each participating country has a single vote, which as a political and purely commercial device may be appropriate. However, when standards fill both trade normalization and safety roles, this system provides no assurance that appropriate levels of technical review will be achieved.

Most non-U.S. national and regional standards development organizations are closed to nonmembers. Consequently, U.S. participation in their processes is inhibited if not altogether proscribed. As a result, mutual standards recognition between the U.S. and other bodies is possible only through ex post facto negotiations at a political level.

In the case of both ISO and non-U.S. national standards, technical adjudication provisions are not directly provided. Technical interpretation of standards provisions is consequently cumbersome and subject to lengthy processes.

Clearly, there are international standards other than ISO standards. This is especially important when applying the language of the Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade, including "international standards" and "international body." ISO standards acquire the title of "international standards" solely by virtue of the membership composition of ISO. However, this is no guarantor of the technical quality or commercial merit of the resulting standards. Other standards acquire the tide of international standard by actual use in the global market; the ones that survive are generally good technical standards.

Consistent with ASME's position on primacy of marketplace tests for international standards, use and development of standards should be treated on a sectoral basis. Various criteria should be considered, including but not limited to consideration of: (1) whether ISO standards currently exist and are being used; (2) whether other standards meeting technical, commercial and procedural tests are available and used; and (3) the technical sophistication of the subject. The TBT Agreement requires openness and nondiscriminatory practices among the entire international community, but at the same time recognizes the special needs and limitations of emerging economies. Maintaining standards of proven excellence is a significant contributor to the well being of the entire international community, especially in the area of standards affecting safety as well as commerce.

The U.S. government could assist in advancing the adoption of U.S. technology and practices through facilitating distribution of U.S. voluntary consensus standards to appropriate bodies within nations seeking greater usage of U.S. standards.

ASME International Standards

ASME produces and maintains hundreds of standards covering a wide range of products and services. Many of these standards are de facto international standards by virtue of their widespread use around the world. This coupled with the standards development process employed by ASME clearly satisfies the fundamental intent of the TBT Agreement of "improving efficiency of production and facilitating the conduct of international trade." Stated simply, a large segment of the international market tacitly accepts many ASME standards as satisfying both commercial and appropriate safety requirements.

ASME has moved, and continues to move, toward greater international harmonization of its standards and conformity assessment activities while recognizing that there is no single best path for achieving this goal.

The determination of which of the following approaches will be taken in a specific standards area will be based on how best ASME can respond to the needs of the international and domestic markets in that sector and to the public health and safety needs of people and governments around the world.

ASME will continue to develop and maintain codes and standards that are used and needed solely by U.S. industries, when appropriate.

Internationally, in some instances, existing international standards will remain the dominant standard for international trade. At other times, a performance-based approach for harmonization might be taken. For instance, it may not be possible to harmonize different existing design standards with each other but it may be possible to develop a single performance-based(5) standard that would be compatible with each of the different design standards (e.g., a performance-based ISO standard that references ASME and other international standards that achieve the required results); such harmonization would be in keeping with the intent of the TBT provisions.

Greater international harmonization of ASME codes and standards will include harmonizing existing de facto ASME international standards with developing technical regulations of additional nations and regions as well as harmonization of interfacing but nonduplicative ASME and ISO standards. Harmonization with ISO standards is a goal; however, at times U.S. health and safety standards may be at risk of being compromised when the push for harmonization by non U.S. parties is unrelenting.

Finally, where need and use by industries and governments clearly reside with the ISO standard, ASME would act to withdraw its standard and disband its committee.

Procedurally, ASME provides for technical consensus in its standards developing committees. ASME policy provides for balance of relevant technical interests on all responsible standards committees. Similarly, ASME does not discriminate on membership of these committees based on citizenship. ASME committees are open to qualified individuals regardless of nationality. Finally, ASME provides procedural due process - fair and open access to its standards development process.

For twenty-five years, ASME's conformity assessment programs have been available worldwide on a basis of absolute equality. Today, ASME accredits manufacturers of boilers, pressure vessels and related equipment in over fifty countries. Procedurally, ASME's conformity assessment programs adhere to the provisions of Article 5 of the TBT Agreement, which itself is based upon ASME's international accreditation system as established in, and operated since, 1972 in response to an earlier (i.e., Kennedy) round of GATT negotiations. Implementation is subject to internal audit, external review and ultimately is subject to federal legal oversight as a result of a consent decree between ASME and the U.S. Department of Justice.

The TBT Agreement provides for technical assistance to other members (Article 11) and extraordinary assistance to developing country members. Consistent with these provisions, ASME currently provides a single inquiry point (10.1), which offers equal access to information, technical inquiries, etc.

ASME has been proactive in providing assistance to developing countries and to more developed countries without well developed standards organizations. We have consulted with both private and government bodies, and provided technical training, organizational assistance and, in several cases, arranged mutual conformity assessment activities.

Specific Recommendations

The United States Trade Representative and other public and private U.S. bodies involved in TBT issues should promote performance-based technical regulations and market accepted international standards as meeting the intent of the TBT provisions.

Strong emphasis should be given to alternatives to ISO standards, if these alternatives meet the intent of discrimination and transparency both technically and procedurally. This is especially true in cases where there are no existing ISO standards and when the global market has found other standards that meet trade and safety needs.

The federal government should work with state and local government bodies that adopt various standards and/or conformity assessment schemes as means of fulfilling local health and safety statutory obligations to assure a uniform understanding and implementation of the provisions of Articles 3 and 11 of the TBT Agreement.

STAFF CONTACTS AND SCHEDULED MEETINGS

Accreditation and Certification Department

The following is a list of ASME Accreditation and Certification programs and ASME staff contacts:

Authorized Inspection Agency Accreditation (AIA): Bibi Rahim (212) 705-8465

Board on Accreditation, Registration, and Certification (BARC): Alan Bagner (212) 705-8580

Boiler and Pressure Vessel Accreditation: Ronald Berberich (212) 705-8461

Committee on Qualifications for Authorized Inspection (QAI): Mark Sheehan (212) 705-8530

Fastener Accreditation: Bibi Rahim (212) 705-8465

ISO 9000 Registration: Christine Bujal (212) 705-8592

Medical-Waste-Incinerator Operator Certification (QMO): Sandra Bridgers (212) 705-8592

Nuclear Accreditation: Bibi Rahim (212) 705-8465

Qualification of Elevator Inspectors Accreditation: Bibi Rahim (212) 705-8465

Reinforced Thermoset Plastic Corrosion-Resistant Equipment Accreditation (RTP): Bibi Rahim (212) 705-8465

Resource Recovery Facility Operators (QRO): Sandra Bridgers (212) 705-8465

Safety and Pollution-Prevention Equipment Used in Offshore Oil and Gas Operations (SPPE): Bibi Rahim (212) 705-8465

Nuclear Codes and Standards Department

The following is a list of ASME Nuclear Codes and Standards committees and ASME staff contacts:

Board on Nuclear Codes and Standards (BNCS): Gerry Eisenberg (212) 705-8510

BPV Joint ACI-ASME Committee on Concrete Components for Nuclear Service (SC III-2): Chris Sanna (212) 705-8513

BPV Subcommittee on Nuclear Inservice Inspection (XI): George Fechter (212) 705-8018

BPV Subcommittee on Nuclear Power (III): Chris Sanna (212) 705-8513

Committee on Cranes for Nuclear Facilities: Jess Moon (212) 705-8514

Committee on Nuclear Quality Assurance (NQA): Chris Sanna (212) 705-8513

Committee on Operation and Maintenance of Nuclear Power Plants (O&M): Jess Moon (212) 705-8514

Committee on Qualification of Mechanical Equipment Used in Nuclear Power Plants (QME): Gerry Eisenberg (212) 705-8510

Joint ASME/NRC Symposium on Pumps and Valve Testing: Gerry Eisenberg (212) 705-8510

Main Committee on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment Equipment (CONAGT): F. Shawn Fitzgerald (212) 705-8056

Scheduled NCS Meetings

The following are scheduled meetings at which the development and maintenance of new or revised codes or standards will be considered. The schedule may not include recent changes, additions, or cancellations. For additional information, contact the appropriate ASME staff individual from the preceding list.

BNCS, June 13, Arlington, Va.; Oct 9, Toronto.

BPV Section XI, Subcommittee, Subgroups, Working Groups, SWGs, and TGs, Aug 11-14, Pittsburgh; Dec 8-12, Reno, Nev.; Apr 27-May 1, 1998, Anaheim, Calif.; Aug 10-13, 1998, Orlando, Fla.

Joint ASME/NRC Symposium on Pumps and Valve Testing, July 21-23, Washington, D.C.

NQA, Subcommittee, Subgroups, and Working Groups, Oct 20-22, Reno, Nev.

O&M, Subcommittee, Subgroups, and Working Groups, June 9-12, Alexandria, Va.; Sept 8-12, Scottsdale, Ariz.; Dec 1-5, Clearwater Beach, Fla.

QME, Sept 16, New York.

Performance Test Codes Department

The following is a list of ASME Performance Test Codes committees and ASME staff contacts:

Board on Performance Test Codes (BPTC): William Hays (212) 705-8550

PTC Performance Monitoring: George Osolsobe (212) 705-8554

PTC 1 General Instructions: William Hays (212) 705-8550

PTC 2 Definitions and Values: William Hays (212) 705-8550

PTC 3 Fuels: Jack Karian (212) 705-8552

PTC 4 Steam Generating Units: Jack Kahan (212) 705-8552

PTC 4.3 Air Heaters: Jack Karian (212) 705-8552

PTC 4.4 Gas Turbine Heat Recovery Steam Generators: Ed McLaren (212) 705-8553

PTC 6 Steam Turbines: Jack Karian (212) 705-8552

PTC 7.1 Rotary Pumps: George Osolsobe (212) 705-8554

PTC 7.2 Power Pumps: George Osolsobe (212) 705-8554

PTC 8.2 Centrifugal Pumps: George Osolsobe (212) 705-8554

PTC 9 Displacement Compressors: Jack Kahan (212) 705-8552

PTC 10 Compressors and Exhausters: Jack Karian (212) 705-8552

PTC 11 Fans: Jack Karian (212) 705-8552

PTC 12.1 Feedwater Heaters: George Osolsobe (212) 705-8554

PTC 12.2 Steam Condensing Apparatus: Ed McLaren (212) 705-8553

PTC 12.3 Deaerators: Jack Karian (212) 705-8552

PTC 12.4 Moisture Separator Reheators: Jack Karian (212) 705-8552

PTC 12.5 Single-Phase Heat Exchangers: George Osolsobe (212) 705-8554

PTC 18 Hydraulic Turbines: George Osolsobe (212) 705-8554

PTC 19.1 Measurement Uncertainty: George Osolsobe (212) 705-8554

PTC 19.2 Pressure Measurement: George Osolsobe (212) 705-8554

PTC 19.3 Temperature Measurement: Ed McLaren (212) 705-8553

PTC 19.5 Flow Measurement: Ed McLaren (212) 705-8553

PTC 19.11 Purity and Quality of Steam (Sampling): George Osolsobe (212) 705-8554

PTC 19.22 Digital Systems Techniques: Ed Mcgaren (212) 705-8553

PTC 19.25 Transient Measurement Uncertainty: George Osolsobe (212) 705-8554

PTC 20.1 Speed and Load Governing Systems for Steam Generator Units: George Osolsobe (212) 705-8554

PTC 20.2 Overspeed Trip Systems for Steam Generator Units: George Osolsobe (212) 705-8554

PTC 20.3 Pressure Control Systems Used on Steam Turbine Generator Units: George Osolsobe (212) 705-8554

PTC 21 Dust Separating Apparatus: William Hays (212) 705-8550

PTC 22 Gas Turbines: George Osolsobe (212) 705-8554

PTC 23 Atmospheric Water Cooling Equipment: Jack Karian (212) 705-8552

PTC 23.1 Spray Cooling Systems: Jack Karian (212) 705-8552

PTC 24 Ejectors: William Hays (212) 705-8550

PTC 25 Safety and Relief Valves: Umberto D'Urso (212) 705-8535

PTC 26 Speed Governing Systems for Internal Combustion Engine Generator Units: William Hays (212) 705-8550

PTC 28 Determining the Properties of Fine Particulate Matter: William Hays (212) 705-8550

PTC 29 Speed Governing Systems for Hydraulic Turbine-Generator Units: Ed McLaren (212) 705-8553

PTC 34 Waste Combustors with Energy Recovery: Jack Karian (212) 705-8552

PTC 36 Measurement of Industrial Sound: George Osolsobe (212) 705-8554

PTC 38 Determining the Concentration of Particulate Matter in a Gas Steam: William Hays (212) 705-8550

PTC 39 Steam Traps: Ed McLaren (212) 705-8553

PTC 40 Flue Gas Desulfurization: Ed McLaren (212) 705-8553

PTC 42 Wind Turbines: William Hays (212) 705-8550

PTC 45 Emission Testing of Municipal Waste Combustors: Ed McLaren (212) 705-8553

PTC 46 Overall Plant Performance Test: Jack Karian (212) 705-8552

PTC 47 Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle: Jack Karian (212) 705-8552

Scheduled PTC Meetings

The following are scheduled meetings at which the development and maintenance of new or revised codes or standards will be considered. The schedule may not include recent changes, additions, or cancellations. For additional information, contact the appropriate ASME staff individual from the preceding list.

BPTC, June 11-12, Arlington, Va.

PTC Performance Monitoring Committee, June 10-11, Arlington, Va.

PTC 4, Committee, June 11-12, Arlington, Va.; Nov 6-7, Denver.

PTC 6, Committee, June 12-13, Arlington, Va.; Nov 5-6, Denver.

PTC 18, Committee, June 12-14, Arlington, Va.

PTC 19.1, Committee, June 30-July 1, Victoria, British Columbia.

PTC 19.3, Committee, June 11-12, Arlington, Va.

PTC 19.25, Committee, Sept 25-26, Mystic, Conn.

PTC 22, Committee, June 13, Arlington, Va.

PTC 34, Committee, June 11-12, Arlington, Va.; Sept 17-18, Nashua, N.H.

PTC 36, Committee, June 12, Arlington, Va.

PTC 46, Committee, Nov 3-4, Denver.

PTC 47, Committee, Sept 11-12, Reno, Nev.

PTC 50, Committee, June 11-12, Arlington, Va.; Nov 3-4, Denver.

Pressure Technology Codes and Standards Department

The following is a fist of ASME Pressure Technology Codes and Standards committees and ASME staff contacts :

Board on Pressure Technology Codes and Standards (BPTCS): Mark Sheehan (212) 705-8530

Bioprocessing Equipment Committee (BPE): Paul Stumpf (212) 705-8536

Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Committee (Exec. and Mc): Joseph Brzuszkiewicz (212) 705-8533

BPV Honors Committee: Faron Lyons (212) 705-8540

BPV SC on Design (SC-D): F. Shawn Fitzgerald (212) 705-8056

BPV SC on Fiber-Reinforced Plastic Pressure Vessels (SC X): Alan Roby (212) 705-8538

BPV SC on Heating Boilers (SC IV) (incl. Sect. VI): Brian Feder (212) 705-8534

BPV SC on Materials (SC II) (Parts A and B): Faron Lyons (212) 705-8540

BPV SC on Nondestructive Examination (SC V): F. Shawn Fitzgerald (212) 705-8056

BPV SC on Power Boilers (SC I) (incl. Sect. VII): Paul Stumpf (212) 705-8536

BPV SC on Pressure Vessels (SC VIII): Alan Roby (212) 705-8538

BPV SC on Safety Valve Requirements (SC SVR): Umberto D'Urso (212) 705-8535

BPV SC on Welding (SC IX) (incl. Sect. II, Part C): Jun Labrador (212) 705-8532

BPV Special WG on High-Pressure Vessels (SC VIII): Patricia Reddington (212) 705-8537

B16 Main Committee - Valves, Flanges, Fittings, and Gaskets: Patricia Reddington (212) 705-8537

B16 SC-B Threaded Fittings (excl. Steel and Cast Iron), Flanges, and Flanged Fittings: Brian Feder (212) 705-8534

B16 SC-C Steel Flanges and Flanged Fittings: Patricia Reddington (212) 705-8537

B16 SC-F Steel Threaded and Welding Fittings: Umberto D'Urso (212) 705-8535

B16 SC-G Gaskets for Flanged Joints: Brian Feder (212) 705-8534

B16 SC-J Copper and Copper Alloy Flanges, Flanged Fittings, and Solder Joint Fittings: Brian Feder (212) 705-8534

B16 SC-L Gas Shutoff and Valves: Brian Feder (212) 705-8534

B16 SC-N Steel Valves and F/F and E/E Dimensions: Umberto D'Urso (212) 705-8535

B31 Code for Pressure Piping (Main Committee, Coordinating Committee, Fabrication and Examination Technical Committee, and Mechanical Design Technical Committee): June Yarmush (212) 705-8539

B31.1 Power Piping Committee: Paul Stumpf (212) 705-8536

B31.3 Chemical Plant and Petroleum Piping Committee: Jon Labrador (212) 705-8532

B31.4/11 Liquid and Slurry Piping Transportation Systems Committee: June Yarmush (212) 705-8539; Brian Feder (212) 705-8534

B31.5 Refrigeration Piping Committee: Umberto D'Urso (212) 705-8535

B31.8 Gas Transmission and Distribution Piping Systems: F. Shawn Fitzgerald (212) 705-8056

B31.9 Building Services Piping Section Committee: Faron Lyons (212) 705-8540

B96 Welded Aluminum Alloy Storage Tanks Committee: Jun Labrador (212) 705-8532

Committee on Reinforced Thermoset Plastic Corrosion-Resistant Equipment (RTP): Alan Ruby (212) 705-8538

High-Pressure Systems Committee (HPS): Umberto D'Urso (212) 705-8535

Post-Construction Main Committee: Richard McGinnis (212) 705-8524

Pressure Technology Sectoral Technical Advisory Committee (PT-STAC): Mark Sheehan (212) 705-8530

Pressure Vessels for Human Occupancy (PVHO): Patricia Reddington (212) 705-8537

Scheduled PTCS Meetings

The following are scheduled meetings at which the development and maintenance of new or revised codes or standards will be considered. The schedule may not include recent changes, additions, or cancellations. For additional information, contact the appropriate ASME staff individual from the preceding list.

Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Committee. Boiler Code Weeks: Sept 15-19, New York; Dec 8-12, Reno, Nev.; Feb 23-27, 1998, Montreal; Apr 27-May 1, 1998, Anaheim, Calif.

SC I: Power Boiler, Thurs.

SC II: Material, Tue.

SC III: Nuclear Power, Thurs.

SC IV: Heating Boilers, Wed.

SC V: Nondestructive Examination, Wed.

SC VIII: Pressure Vessels, Thurs.

SC IX: Welding, Tue.

SCD: Design, Tue.

Main Committee: Public session, Fri.

ASME staff contact for schedule information: Lois B. Marotta (212) 705-7023

B31.1, Oct 6-9, Houston; Feb 2-4, 1998, Phoenix.

B31.3, Oct 6-10, Houston; April 20-23, 1998, Clearwater Beach, Fla.

B31.4/11, Oct 14-15, Savannah, Ga.

B31.8, Sept 9-11, Santa Fe, N.M.

Post-Construction Main Committee, Sept 15, New York; Dec 8, Reno, Nev.

PVHO Committee, July 23-25, Panama City, Fla.

SC-Flaw Evaluation, Sept 15, New York; Dec 8, Reno, Nev.

SC-Inspection Planning, Sept 15, New York; Dec 8, Reno, Nev.

SC-Safety Valve Requirements, Aug 11-14, Burlington, Vt.

Safety Codes and Standards Department

The following is a list of ASME Safety Codes and Standards committees and ASME staff contacts:

Board on Safety Codes and Standards (BSCS): Marcy Weinstock (212) 705-8526

Advisory Committee on Environmental Management (ACEM): Geraldine Burdeshaw (212) 705-8523

A13 Committee on Scheme for the Identification of Piping Systems: Melissa Aranzamendez (212) 705-8522

A17 Committee on Elevators and Escalators: Geraldine Burdeshaw (212) 705-8523

A39 Committee on Safety Requirements for Window Cleaning: Melissa Aranzamendez (212) 705-8522

A90 Committee on Safety Standards for Manlifts: Melissa Aranzamendez (212) 705-8522

A120 Committee on Safety Requirements for Powered Platforms for Building Maintenance: Melissa Aranzamendez (212) 705-8522

B15 Committee on Safety Standards for Mechanical Power Transmission Apparatus: Joseph Pang (212) 705-8525

B19 Committee on Safety Standards for Compressor Systems: Melissa Aranzamendez (212) 705-8522

B20 Committee on Safety Standards for Conveyors and Related Equipment: Joseph Pang (212) 705-8525

B30 Committee on Safety Standards for Cableways, Cranes, Derricks, Hoists, Hooks, Jacks, and Slings: Joseph Pang (212) 705-8525

B56 Committee on Powered and Nonpowered Industrial Trucks: Richard McGinnis (212) 705-8524

Committee on Controls and Safety Devices for Automatically Fired Boilers (CSDAFB): Melissa Aranzamendez (212) 705-8522

Committee on Portable Automotive Lifting Devices (PALD): Geraldine Burdeshaw (212) 705-8523

Committee on Qualification of Elevator Inspectors (QEI): Marcy Weinstock (212) 705-8526

Committee on Qualifications of Fossil-Fuel-Fired Plant Operators (QFO): Richard McGinnis (212) 705-8524

Committee on Qualification of Medical Waste Incinerator Operators (QMO): Richard McGinnis (212) 705-8524

Committee on Qualifications of Hazardous Waste Incinerator Operators (QHO): Geraldine Burdeshaw (212) 705-8523

Committee on Qualifications of Resource Recovery Facility Operators (QRO): Geraldine Burdeshaw (212) 705-8523

Committee on Safety and Pollution Prevention Equipment Used in Off-shore Oil and Gas Operations (SPPE): Melissa Aranzamendez (212) 705-8522

Scheduled SCS Meetings

The following are scheduled meetings at which the development and maintenance of new or revised codes or standards will be considered. The schedule may not include recent changes, additions, or cancellations. For additional information, contact the appropriate ASME staff individual from the preceding list.

A17 Committee, June 9-12, New York; Sept 22-25, Vancouver, British Columbia; Jan 12-16, 1998, Palm Beach Gardens, Fla.

B20 Committee, Oct 9, Louisville, Ky.

B30 Committee, Sept 8-10, Milwaukee; Dec 8-10, Nashville, Tenn.

Standardization Department

The following is a list of ASME Standardization committees and ASME staff contacts:

Board on Standardization (BoS): Steve Weinman (212) 705-7002

A112 Plumbing Materials and Equipment: Calvin Gomez (212) 705-7021

B1 Screw Threads: George Fechter (212) 705-8018

B5 Machine Tools: George Fechter (212) 705-8018

B18 Fasteners: Richard McGinnis (212) 705-8524

B29 Chains and Sprockets: Kate Padilla (212) 705-7004

B32 Metal and Metal Alloy Wrought Mill Product Nominal Size: Steve Weinman (212) 705-7002

B40 Specifications for Pressure and Vacuum Gages: George Fechter (212) 705-8018

B46 Classification and Designation of Surface Qualities: Brian Biddinger (212) 705-8684

B47 Gage Blanks: Calvin Gomez (212) 705-7021

B73 Chemical Standard Pumps: Calvin Gomez (212) 705-7021

B89 Dimensional Metrology: Brian Biddinger (212) 705-8684

B94 Cutting Tools, Holders, Drivers, and Bushings: Brian Biddinger (212) 705-8684

B107 Hand Tools and Accessories: George Fechter (212) 705-8018

B133 Gas Turbine Procurement: Kate Padilla (212) 705-7004

H213 Harmonization of Dimensional and Geometric Product Specifications and Verification: Steve Weinman (212) 705-7002

Measurement of Fluid in Closed Conduits (MFC): Kate Padilla (212) 705-7004

Overhead Hoist (HST): Calvin Gomez (212) 705-7021

Pallets, Slip Sheets, and Other Bases for Unit Loads (MHI): Kate Padilla (212) 705-7004

Prevention of Water Damage to Turbines (TDP): Alan Roby (212) 705-8538

Slewing Ring Bearings (SRB): George Fechter (212) 705-8018

Steel Stacks (STS): Kate Padilla (212) 705-7004

Y14 Engineering Drawing and Related Documentation Practices: Calvin Gomez (212) 705-7021

Scheduled Standardization Meetings

The following are scheduled meetings at which the development and maintenance of new or revised codes or standards will be considered. The schedule may not include recent changes, additions, or cancellations. For additional information, contact the appropriate ASME staff individual from the preceding list.

B1 Committee, Oct 28-31, Philadelphia.

B5 Committee, Nov 6-10, Longboat Key, Fla.

B18 Committee, Dec 1-4, Houston.

B46 Committee, Oct 5-6, Greensboro, N.C.

B73 Committee, Oct 28, Coraopolis, Pa.

B89 Committee, Oct 8-12, Greensboro, N.C.; Jan 27-31, 1998, Longboat Key, Fla.

Y14 Committee, Oct 4-10, Greensboro, N.C.

PUBLIC REVIEW DRAFTS

Order any draft listed herein from Silvana Rodriguez-Bhatti, Mgr Administration, ASME Codes & Standards, 345 E 47th St, M/S 10B, New York, NY 10017. Orders must be prepaid.

A17.1a-19XX Safety Code for Elevators and Escalators (Addenda to A17.1-1996)

This standard covers safety requirements for elevators, escalators, dumbwaiters, moving walks, material lifts, and dumbwaiters with automatic transfer devices wheelchair lifts, and stairway chairlifts.

Single copy price: $10.

Send comments to: Geraldine Burdeshaw, 10C. Comment period ends: July 22.

A17.2.1a-19XX Inspectors' Manual for Electric Elevators (Addenda to A17.2.1a-1996)

This manual covers recommended inspection and testing procedures for electric elevators required to conform to the Safety Code for Elevators A17.1-1955 and later editions and Safety Code for Existing Elevators A17.3.

Single copy price: $10.

Send comments to: Geraldine Burdeshaw, 10C. Comment period ends: July 22.

A17.2.2-19XX Inspectors' Manual for Hydraulic Elevators (Revision of A17.2.2-1994)

This manual covers recommended inspection and testing procedures for direct-plunger hydraulic elevators required to conform to the Safety Code for Elevators A17.11955 and later editions and Safety Code for Existing Elevators A17.3.

Single copy price: $10.

Send comments to: Geraldine Burdeshaw, 10C. Comment period ends: July 22.

A17.2.3b-19XX Inspectors' Manual for Escalators and Moving Walks (Addenda to A17.2.3-1994)

This manual covers recommended inspection and testing procedures for escalators and moving walks required to conform to the Safety Code for Elevators A17.1-1955 and later editions and Safety Code for Existing Elevators A17.3.

Single copy price: $10.

Send comments to: Geraldine Burdeshaw, 10C. Comment period ends: July 22.

A17.3a-19XX Safety Code for Existing Elevators and Escalators (Addenda to A17.3-1996)

This standard covers retroactive requirements for existing elevators and escalators. The purpose of this code is to establish minimum requirements that will provide a reasonable degree of safety for the general public.

Single copy price: $10.

Send comments to: Geraldine Burdeshaw, 10C. Comment period ends: July 22.

A120.1a-19XX Safety Requirements for Powered Platforms for Building Maintenance (Addenda to A120.1-1996)

This standard establishes safety requirements for powered platforms (scaffolds) for buildings where window cleaning and related services are accomplished by means of suspended equipment at heights in excess of 35 ft (11 m) above a safe surface.

Single copy price: $10.

Send comments to: Melissa Aranzamendez, 10C. Comment period ends: July 8.

B31.1c-19XX Power Piping (Addenda to B31.1-1995)

This code prescribes minimum requirements for the design, materials, fabrication, erection, test, and inspection of power and auxiliary-service piping systems for electric-generation stations, industrial and institutional plants, central- and district-heating plants, and district-heating systems.

Single copy price: $45.

Send comments to: Paul Stumpf, 10C. Comment period ends: July 22.

B73.3M-19XX Specification for Sealless Horizontal End-Suction Centrifugal Pumps for Chemical Process

This standard covers sealless centrifugal pumps of horizontal end-suction single-stage, center-line discharge design, including dimensional interchangeability and features to facilitate installation and maintenance.

Single copy price: $10.

Send comments to: Calvin Gomez, 10C. Comment period ends: July 22.

B89.4.1a-1997 Methods for Performance Evaluation of Coordinate Measuring Machines (Addenda to B89.4.1-1997)

The purpose of this appendix is to recommend vibration-measurement instrumentation and procedures for measuring vibration at coordinate measuring machine (CMM) installation sites.

Single copy price: $10.

Send comments to: Brian Biddinger, 10C. Comment period ends: July 8.

B107.34M-19XX Socket Wrenches for Spark Plugs

This standard is intended to cover the complete general and dimensional data for detachable hand-use socket wrenches with square drive for spark plugs.

Single copy price: $10.

Send comments to: George Fechter, 10C. Comment period ends: July 8.

MFC-4M-1986 Measurement of Gas Flow by Turbine Meters (Reaffirmation of MFC-4M-1986)

This standard applies to axial full-flow turbine meters. It covers the measurement of gas by turbine meter, the meter's construction, installation, operation-performance characteristics, data computation and presentation, calibration, field checking, and other related considerations of the meter.

Single copy price: $10.

Send comments to: Kate Padilla, 10C. Comment period ends: July 8.

PTC 19.22-1986 Digital-Systems Techniques (Reaffirmation of PTC 19.22-1986)

This document defines the scope and application of digital-system techniques for implementing data acquisition, calculations, and results presentation for use with ASME Performance Test Codes.

Single copy price: $20.

Send comments to: George Osolsobe, 13D. Comment period ends: July 22.

PTC 36-1985 Measurement of Industrial Sound (Reaffirmation of PTC 36-1985)

This standard covers procedures for measuring and reporting airborne sound emissions from mechanical equipment.

Single copy price: $10.

Send comments to: George Osolsobe, 13D. Comment period ends: July 22.

INQUIRIES

ASME procedures provide for reconsideration of these interpretations when or if additional information is available that the inquirers believe might affect the interpretations. Further, persons aggrieved by these interpretations may appeal to the cognizant ASME committee or subcommittee. As stated in the foreword of the code documents, ASME does not "approve," "certify," "rate," or "endorse" any item, construction, proprietary device, or activity.

B16-97-005

Inquiry: Can acceptable-proof pres-sure-test data for an ASME B16.9-1993 "tee" be extended to cover the acceptance of an equivalent size and pressure rated B16.9 "cross"?

Reply: No. A "tee" is not a representative fitting for a "cross." See Para. 9.4.

B16-97-006

Inquiry: Does ASME B16.9-1993 Table 2 "B" dimensions for 45-degree-long radius elbows ensure that two placed in series would match the dimension of a 90-degree-long radius elbow?

Reply: No.

Code Case for ASME Code for Pressure Piping

From time to time certain actions of the ASME B31 Code Committee will be published for the information of interested parties. While these do not constitute formal revision of the code, they can be used in specifications, or otherwise, as representing considered opinions of the committee.

Pending revision of the ASME B31 Code for Pressure Piping, the committee has recommended that selected cases be published so that industry can take immediate advantage of corresponding proposed revisions. The following case is given as an interim action of the committee on the ASME B31 Code for Pressure Piping, that will not constitute a part of the code until formal action has been taken by ASME on revision of the code.

This case was approved by the Board on Pressure Technology Codes and Standards on Apr 11, 1997.

This case will be subject to review until Aug 15, 1997. Comments should be submitted to June Yarmush, M/S 10C, ASME, 345 E. 47th St., New York, NY 10017.

Code for Pressure Piping - B31; Case 167 Use of Mechanically Applied Composite-Material Wrap for Pipeline Repairs, B31.4

Inquiry: Under what conditions may mechanically applied composite-material wrap be used for pipeline repairs covered by 451.6.2(b)?

Reply: It is the opinion of the committee that if it is not practical to take the pipeline out of service, nonleaking corroded areas may be repaired by the installation of a mechanically applied composite-material wrap used to reinforce the pipeline. Mechanically applied composite-material wrap may be used provided that design and installation methods are proven for the intended service. The user is cautioned that a written qualified procedure performed by trained personnel is a requirement and the record shall be retained in accordance with Para. 455. (Note: This case shall expire on Apr 30, 2000, unless previously annulled or reaffirmed.)

CORRECTION

Pending revision of the ASME B31 Code for Pressure Piping, the committee has recommended that selected cases be published so that industry can take immediate advantage of corresponding proposed revisions.

Case 152: Carbon Dioxide Transportation Piping Systems was published in the May 1997 Edition of Mechanical Engineering. This case has been incorporated into the 1994 Addenda to B31.4-1992, Pipeline Transportation Systems for Liquid Hydrocarbons and Other Liquids. Therefore the case is being annulled.

The following case is given as an interim action of the committee on the ASME B31 Code for Pressure Piping that will not constitute a part of the code until formal action has been taken by ASME on revision of the code.

1 The Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) was adopted at the conclusion of the Uruguay Round of General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) negotiations in conjunction with the Agreement establishing the WTO.

2 Excerpts from the National Export Strategy, Trade Promotion Coordinating Committee, Fourth Annual Report to the United States Congress, October 1996, Toward the Next American Century: A U.S. Strategic Response to Foreign Competitive Practices, Section II, "Emerging Issues in Commercial Policy, Standards," states: "Standards and conformity assessment requirements imposed by other national and regional authorities have become critical factors in determining the competitiveness of American firms and workers . . . while some sectors, such as information technology, work primarily within an existing international standards framework, standards for construction products or electrical equipment tend to be domestically-oriented. In some sectors, U.S.-developed standards are accepted virtually worldwide. Examples include the American Society of Mechanical Engineers boiler and pressure vessel code . . ."

3 International Organization for Standardization

4 As used in this document, harmonization implies compatibility of requirements and not necessarily similarity nor sameness; sectors are different industries or markets (e.g., pressure equipment, telecommunications, and pharmaceuticals).

5 The proposed revision of the OMB A119, "Federal Participation in the Development and Use of Voluntary Consensus Standards and in Conformity Assessment Activities," states, "A performance standard means a standard that states requirements in terms of required results with criteria for verifying compliance but without stating the methods for achieving required results."
COPYRIGHT 1997 American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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Title Annotation:American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Publication:Mechanical Engineering-CIME
Article Type:Transcript
Date:Jun 1, 1997
Words:5891
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