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ASME 2013 Honors.

TED BELYTSCHKO

HONORARY MEMBERSHIP

TED BELYTSCHKO, PH.D., MCCORMICK Distinguished Professor and Walter P. Murphy Professor of Computational Mechanics at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., is recognized for fundamental contributions to computational and applied mechanics, particularly the extended finite element method and its impact on industry.

Dr. Belytschko is a world renowned computational mechanician whose innovative and fundamental contributions to solid mechanics have enabled the solution of previously intractable problems and inspired new directions of research. He has had a broad impact on mechanics and particularly computational mechanics as reflected in his citation report: He has 26,595 citations and an h-index of 86.

He joined the faculty at Northwestern University in 1977 and was chair of the department of mechanical engineering from 1997 to 2002. Previously he was on the faculty (1968-77) at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Dr. Belytschko has developed explicit finite element methods that are widely used in crashworthiness analysis and virtual prototyping. Recently he has worked on meshfree methods, techniques for representing arbitrary discontinuities in finite elements, and multiscale coupling methods.

He is co-author of Nonlinear Finite Element Methods for Continua and Structures (John Wiley & Sons, 2000) with W.K. Liu and B. Moran and A First Course in Finite Elements (John Wiley & Sons, 2007) with J. Fish. He is editor-in-chief of the International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering. He has published more than 400 journal papers and is one of the most cited researchers in engineering science.

An ASME Fellow, Dr. Belytschko received the Timoshenko Medal in 2001. In 2007 the Applied Mechanics Division renamed its Applied Mechanics Award the Ted Belytschko Applied Mechanics Division Award.

Dr. Belytschko is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Mechanics, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Society of Civil Engineers, and the United States Association for Computational Mechanics (USACM).

Dr. Belytschko earned his bachelor's degree in engineering sciences and his Ph.D. in mechanics at the Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, in 1965 and 1968, respectively. He holds three honorary doctorates.

SIDNEY A. BERNSEN

MELVIN R. GREEN CODES AND STANDARDS MEDAL

THE MELVIN R. GREEN CODES AND Standards Medal was established in 1976 as the Codes and Standards Medal and renamed in 1996 to honor the memory and extraordinary contributions of Melvin R. Green, an ardent supporter of industrial standards.

Sidney A. Bernsen, Ph.D., consultant, is honored for distinguished leadership and professionalism in the development, advancement, promotion, and acceptance of ASME codes and standards; and for pioneering efforts in the development and standardization of quality assurance and nuclear risk management programs for application in power plants and other facilities.

For 60 years Dr. Bernsen has made outstanding contributions as a leader in research, development, design, licensing, quality assurance, and management of nuclear and other high technology facilities including a number of unique and first-ofa-kind projects and programs.

Dr. Bernsen joined the Bechtel Corporation in San Francisco in 1963. Among his numerous management positions, he was the first corporate quality assurance manager and corporate chief nuclear engineer. He was named a Bechtel Fellow in 1985.

Since retiring from Bechtel in 1993 he has been a consultant providing quality assurance management services to two engineering companies: ANATECH Corp. in San Diego and Hopper Engineering Associates in Redondo Beach, Calif. He also has provided expert witness support for industry.

Dr. Bernsen's standards activities included serving on the Executive Standards Council of the American National Standards Institute, and chairing the International Organization for Standardization's Committee on Nuclear Facilities.

An ASME Fellow, Dr. Bernsen was the first chair of the ASME Standards Committee on Nuclear Quality Assurance; he served on the committee for 30 years and is now an honorary member. He is a founding member of the ASME Board on Nuclear Codes and Standards and has served continuously for more than 38 years.

In 1998 Dr. Bernsen was appointed the first chair of the ASME Standards Committee on Nuclear Risk Management, and he continues as a member and serves on the Executive Committee. He is also a member of the Standards Board on New Development and has served as vice chair. Dr. Bernsen is an Honorary Member and past director of the American Nuclear Society.

He earned his bachelor's, master's, and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering from Purdue University in West Lafayette, Ind., in 1950,1951, and 1953, respectively.

G. WAYNE CLOUGH

RALPH COATS ROE MEDAL

THE RALPH COATS ROE MEDAL, ESTABLISHED in 1972, recognizes an outstanding contribution toward a better public understanding and appreciation of the engineer's worth to contemporary society.

G. Wayne Clough, P.E., Ph.D., secretary of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC, is honored for contributions to both higher education policy and U.S. technology policy; and for demonstrating, through distinguished leadership of the Smithsonian, that an accomplished engineer can be the guardian and primary advocate for preserving and promoting our national cultural heritage.

Since becoming secretary in July 2008, Dr. Clough has taken the Smithsonian, the world's largest museum and research complex, in new directions. A comprehensive strategic plan--the first of its kind for the Smithsonian--provides a new cross-disciplinary framework for goals, enterprises, and operations, with a focus on four grand challenges: unlocking the mysteries of the universe, understanding and sustaining a biodiverse planet, valuing world cultures, and understanding the American experience.

Dr. Clough is responsible for an annual budget of $1 billion, 6,400 employees, and 6,200 volunteers. Since his arrival more than 400 exhibitions have opened across the institution, which has activities in nearly 100 countries and reaches Americans in all 50 states through traveling exhibitions, media, and the Internet.

Before his appointment to the Smithsonian, Dr. Clough was president of the Georgia Institute of Technology for 14 years.

Dr. Clough has served as chair of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE)/ National Research Council Committee on New Orleans Regional Hurricane Protection Reconstruction, a six-year term as member of the National Science Board, and seven years as a member of President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. He currently serves on the American Academy of Arts and Sciences' (AAAS) Commission on the Future of Humanities and Social Sciences.

Dr. Clough is a member of the NAE and AAAS, an honorary member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, a member of the American Society for Engineering Education and the American Association of Engineering Societies, and a national honor member in Chi Epsilon, the Civil Engineering Honor Society.

He received his bachelor's and master's degrees in civil engineering from Georgia Tech in 1964 and 1965, respectively. He earned his Ph.D. in civil engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1969. Dr. Clough holds nine honorary doctorates.

ANN DOWLING

KATE GLEASON AWARD

THE KATE GLEASON AWARD, ESTABLISHED in 2011, recognizes outstanding achievements by a female engineer. It honors the legacy of the first woman to be welcomed into ASME as a full member.

Ann Dowling, CEng, CPhys, Ph.D., Sc.D., head of the department of engineering and deputy vice-chancellor at the University of Cambridge, U.K., is recognized for significant contributions to advance gas turbine engine technology and the engineering science of combustion and acoustics; and for outstanding leadership in industry-university cooperative research and international engineering education.

Dr. Dowling is also a professor of mechanical engineering and chair of the University Gas Turbine Partnership with Rolls-Royce. She is one of the founders of the Energy Efficient Cities initiative at Cambridge and was the U.K. lead of the Silent Aircraft Initiative, a collaboration between researchers at Cambridge and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Her research on unsteady combustion provides insight and models that are enabling gas turbine manufacturers to avoid damaging instabilities in low-emission combustors. She demonstrated that active feedback control is a powerful way of eliminating the damaging interactions that lead to instability. This technology, which results in extra thrust from an afterburner and ultra-low emissions from ground-based gas turbines, complements the passive control techniques Dr. Dowling has developed that are now being pursued by a number of manufacturers. Her group was the first to demonstrate the control of a combustion oscillation through the suitably phased unsteady injection of additional fuel. That laboratory experiment was rapidly followed by a demonstration of feasibility on a full-size aeroengine. She developed robust and adaptive control strategies that continue to work effectively through changing operating conditions.

She is a Fellow of the Royal Society and the Royal Academy of Engineering; a foreign member of the National Academy of Engineering (U.S.) and the French Academy of Sciences; an Honorary Fellow of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers and the Institution of Engineering Designers; a Fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society, the Institute of Acoustics, the Institute of Physics, the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications, and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics; and a member of Academia Europaea.

Dr. Dowling earned three degrees from Girton College: bachelor's and master's degrees in mathematics; and a Ph.D. in engineering in 1978. In 2006 she earned a Sc.D. from the University of Cambridge.

JOHN HOWELL

HONORARY MEMBERSHIP

JOHN HOWELL, P.E., PH.D., ERNEST COCKRELL Jr. Memorial Chair Emeritus in the department of mechanical engineering at The University of Texas at Austin (UT), is recognized for continuous support of the engineering profession through service to ASME and other societies; and for ongoing contributions to research in heat transfer and to engineering education through technical publications and textbooks.

Dr. Howell is among the world's preeminent scholars in the field of radiation heat transfer. He began his career with the NASA Lewis (now Glenn) Research Center in Cleveland in 1961 and joined the faculty at the University of Houston in 1968.

In 1978 Dr. Howell moved to UT, where he held positions including department chair, director of the Center for Energy Studies, associate dean for research, and director of the Advanced Manufacturing Center in the College of Engineering. Since 2010 he has been chair emeritus. Although retired, Dr. Howell has continued his research with graduate students and is preparing a new (sixth) edition of the text Thermal Radiation Heat Transfer. He also self-published three books on the history of technology.

He is author/co-author of approximately 125 archival journals publications and nearly 150 conference papers. He holds seven patents.

An ASME Fellow, Dr. Howell served on the Board on Engineering Education in positions including chair of the ad hoc subcommittee to review materials for recruiting students into engineering. He also chaired the Task Force to Review the National Science Foundation Budget and testified before the U.S. House Appropriations Subcommittee. For the Heat Transfer Division, he served as member and chair on a number of committees and task forces, and was technical editor of the Journal of Heat Transfer. He received the Heat Transfer Memorial Award in 1991 and the ASME/ American Institute of Chemical Engineers' Max Jacob Memorial Award in 1998. In 2002 a Symposium on Radiation Heat Transfer was held in honor of Dr. Howell's 65th birthday during the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA)/ASME Thermophysics and Heat Transfer Conference.

He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a Fellow of the AIAA, and a foreign member of the Russian Academy of Sciences.

Dr. Howell earned three degrees from Case Institute of Technology (now Case Western Reserve University) in Cleveland: his bachelor's and master's degrees in chemical engineering in 1958 and 1960, respectively; and his Ph.D. in engineering in 1962.

SAID JAHANMIR

Honorary Membership

SAID JAHANMIR, PH.D., PRESIDENT and CEO of MiTiHeart Corporation in Gaithersburg, Md.; and vice president for biotechnology at Mohawk Innovative Technology, Inc. (MiTi) in Albany, N.Y., is honored for seminal contributions to the advancement of mechanical engineering, particularly the multidisciplinary technologies in tribology, manufacturing, biomedical materials and devices, and in the promotion of standards; and for significant contributions to ASME.

Dr. Jahanmir is leading research and development efforts on implantable blood pumps, high-temperature coatings, high-speed micro-machining, and high-speed oil-free compressors. His leadership has led to the development and pre-clinical testing of a new generation of mechanical heart assist pumps with magnetic bearings for heart failure patients, and the development of a novel ultra high-speed micro-machining spindle with rotational speeds beyond 500,000 rpm.

Prior to joining MiTi, Dr. Jahanmir was at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, Md. (19872002). He served in a number of capacities including leader of the Ceramic Manufacturing Group, and he coordinated several international collaborations on pre-standards research that led to ASTM and ISO standards. Earlier affiliations include the National Science Foundation, where he was the first director of the Tribology Program.

Dr. Jahanmir has published more than 240 archival papers and major reports, and has edited several books and conference proceedings. He has served as the founding executive editor of Machining Science and Technology, now in its 17th year.

An ASME Fellow, Dr. Jahanmir has been an active volunteer and a strong advocate for change and growth. He served as chair of the Tribology Division, the Board on Research and Technology Development, and the International Congress Committee. As a governor at large (2009-12) he served on several Board committees and Presidential task forces, and was a driving force for the ASME Global Impact Strategic Initiative and the new ASME website.

He is a Fellow of the Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers, and a member of the American Society for Artificial Internal Organs and the International Society for Rotary Blood Pumps.

Dr. Jahanmir received his bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Washington in Seattle in 1971. He earned his master's degree and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge in 1973 and 1976, respectively.

SADIK KAKAC

HONORARY MEMBERSHIP

SADIK KAKAC, PH.D., PROFESSOR OF mechanical engineering at TOBB University of Economics and Technology (TOBB ETU) in Ankara, Turkey, is recognized for seminal and pioneering achievements in transient two-phase flows, fuel cells, and micro/nano heat transfer research and engineering; and for sustained contributions to education as an organizer of conferences and author of well-known textbooks on heat transfer and heat exchangers.

Dr. Kakac is a distinguished scientist and renowned educator whose career spans more than five decades. He began his academic life in the department of mechanical engineering at the Middle East Technical University (METU) in Ankara and, during his tenure (1960-82), was very active in scientific and public service. He is the founder of heat transfer education and research at METU; and he established and directed the Heat Technique Research Unit, a research center sponsored by TUBITAK, the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey.

He was a visiting professor (1980-82) at the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla., and in 1982 he was appointed as a full professor of mechanical engineering with tenure. He served as chairman of the department (1990-98). In 2008 Dr. Kakac became professor emeritus at the University of Miami and joined TOBB ETU.

His publications include more than 200 papers. He is the author/co-author of a number of popular textbooks, and editor of 15 volumes on thermal-fluid sciences. He organized many NATO Advanced Study Institutes and workshops.

An ASME Fellow, Dr. Kakac founded the ASME Student Section at the TOBB ETU. He received the Society's Heat Transfer Memorial Award in 1997 and Heat Transfer Division's 75th Anniversary Award (2013).

He is a member of the Turkish Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Turkish Academy of Sciences, and the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Bashkortostan (Russian); a corresponding member of the Brazilian Academy of Sciences; a Fellow of the International Centre for Heat and Mass Transfer and member of its Scientific Council and Executive Committee; and a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

Dr. Kakac received his Dipl.-Ing. degree from the department of mechanical engineering at the Technical University of Istanbul in 1955. He earned master's degrees in mechanical engineering and nuclear engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge in 1959 and 1960, respectively. In 1965 he earned his Ph.D. from the Victoria University of Manchester, U.K.

ARUNAVA MAJUMDAR

HONORARY MEMBERSHIP

ARUNAVA MAJUMDAR, PH.D., VICE president for energy at Google Inc. in Mountain View, Calif., is honored for pioneering research in micro/nanoscale heat transfer; and for distinguished service on the Journal of Heat Transfer editorial board, as the founding chair of the ASME Nanotechnology Institute, as founding director of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), and as acting under secretary of energy.

Dr. Majumdar is widely recognized as one of the foremost leaders in energy innovation. He has distinguished himself in research, teaching, university and professional service, and national service.

At Google Inc., he is driving Google.org's energy initiatives and advising the company on its broader energy strategy.

In October 2009 Dr. Majumdar was nominated by President Obama and confirmed by the Senate to become the founding director of DOE's ARPA-E, where he served until June 2012. Between March 2011 and June 2012 he also served as the acting under secretary of energy and senior advisor to the secretary of energy.

Prior to joining DOE, Dr. Majumdar was the Almy and Agnes Maynard Chair Professor of Mechanical Engineering, and Materials Science and Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley and the associate laboratory director for energy and environment at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Before joining UC Berkeley in 1997 he was on the faculty at the University of California, Santa Barbara and Arizona State University in Tempe. His research career includes the science and engineering of nanoscale materials and devices as well as large engineered systems. He helped shape several strategic initiatives in the areas of energy efficiency, renewable energy, and energy storage.

Dr. Majumdar has published more than 200 journal papers. He has given invited lectures worldwide, and has organized several conferences and symposiums. He holds 16 patents.

An ASME Fellow, Dr. Majumdar received the Society's Melville Medal, Gustus Larson Memorial Award, and Heat Transfer Memorial Award-Science.

He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a member of the Materials Research Society.

Dr. Majumdar received his bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, in 1985; and his master's degree and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from UC Berkeley in 1987 and 1989, respectively.

SIA NEMAT-NASSER

ASME MEDAL

THE ASME MEDAL WAS ESTABLISHED in 1920 and is awarded for eminently distinguished engineering achievement.

Sia Nemat-Nasser, Ph.D., distinguished professor of mechanics and materials, and director of the Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials at the University of California, San Diego, is honored for creating micro-architectured composites to mitigate shock-wave induced traumatic brain injury; metamaterials to redirect, attenuate, and manage stress waves; and original comprehensive models of deformation and failure of metallic structures with application to metal forming and failure prevention; and for excellent contributions in promoting ASME's Materials Division.

Dr. Nemat-Nasser earned his bachelor's degree in engineering from Sacramento State University in California, in 1960. While serving as an assistant professor in civil engineering at Sacramento State, he earned his master's degree in civil engineering and his Ph.D. in structural engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1961 and 1964, respectively.

Following a postdoctoral fellowship at Northwestern University in Evanston, 111., Dr. Nemat-Nasser joined the faculty at the University of California, San Diego, in 1966. He subsequently spent 15 years (1970-85) at Northwestern before returning to UC San Diego.

At UC San Diego, he spearheaded the creation of an integrated Materials Science and Engineering Graduate Program and served as its founding director (1989-94). He was co-director and director of the National Science Foundation-funded Institute for Mechanics and Materials.

Dr. Nemat-Nasser has published a large number of scholarly works. He is the founding editor and editor-in-chief of the international journal Mechanics of Materials, and has edited the book series Mechanics Today and Mechanics of Elastic and Inelastic Solids. He has served on the board of several international journals, and has lectured widely.

An ASME Fellow, Dr. Nemat-Nasser served as chair of the Materials Division, and chair of its Publications and Program committees. Among other Society activities, he was chair of the Applied Mechanics Division's Geomechanics Committee and group representative for the Materials and Structures Technical Group. He received numerous ASME honors.

Dr. Nemat-Nasser is a member of the National Academy of Engineering; and a Fellow of the Society of Engineering Science, the American Academy of Mechanics, and the Society for Experimental Mechanics.

ANIBAL L. TABOAS

DIXY LEE RAY AWARD

THE DIXY LEE RAY AWARD, ESTABLISHED in 1998, recognizes significant contributions in the broad field of environmental protection.

Anibal L. Taboas, president and CEO of ASPIRA Inc. of Illinois, headquartered in Chicago, is honored for advancing closure of the nuclear fuel cycle, and for internationally recognized leadership in regulatory engineering and sustainable environmental management.

Mr. Taboas' early efforts in the development of instrumentation and control systems for advanced fossil and nuclear power reactors progressed into nuclear/mechanical engineering directly involved with the defense nuclear fuel cycle. His work experience ranges from research and development at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory to a career at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) from which he retired, followed by consulting on strategic leadership, risk management, and the defense fuel cycle.

His DOE assignments, from senior technical advisor in Defense Programs to Argonne Area Office manager, facilitated close relationships with intellectual leaders such as A. Alan Moghissi, Goetz Oertel, and Rosita Lopez, as well as the late Dixy Lee Ray, Edward Teller, Margaret Mead, Ken Gablin, and "Moose" Hardin-kindred spirits willing to tackle hard issues, all in the public good.

Among his significant contributions, Mr. Taboas established a defensible technical basis for regulations governing the categorization, management, and disposal of hazardous materials according to practicability and risk, rather than by origin. Subsequent statutory and regulatory acceptance has served as the solid foundation for numerous developments, such as the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.

In July 2012 Mr. Taboas joined ASPIRA Inc. of Illinois, a Hispanic nonprofit organization with a rich history of leadership development and education of highly underserved populations.

An ASME Fellow, Mr. Taboas served on Environmental Engineering Division committees and as chair of the International Conference on Environment Management series. He received ASME's Dedicated Service Award in 2010. He is a charter member of the Association of Energy Engineers.

Mr. Taboas earned a B.S. in physics at the University of Dayton in Ohio in 1971; an M.S. in physics at Indiana State University in Terre Haute in 1972; and an M.S. in mechanical/nuclear engineering from Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., in 1978.

Barnett-Uzgiris Product Safety Design Award

REN-JYE YANG

The Barnett-Uzgiris Product Safety Design Award was established as the Triodyne Safety Award by the Design Engineering Division. In 2008, it was elevated to an ASME award and renamed. The award recognizes individuals who have made significant contributions to the safe design of products through teaching, research, and professional accomplishments.

Ren-Jye Yang, P.E., Ph.D, a senior technical leader in the passive safety department at Ford Research and Advanced Engineering in Dearborn, Mich., is recognized for significant contributions to the safety design of vehicles through research and engineering practice, particularly pioneering developments and applications of computer-aided engineering design methods that led to innovative vehicle designs with improved safety and performance.

Dr. Yang joined Ford Motor Company in 1988 and is currently responsible for the development of multidisciplinary design optimization, and safety optimization and robustness methods. He has made original contributions in design sensitivity analysis, shape and topology optimization, reliability-based design optimization, crashworthiness and restraint system optimization, and multidisciplinary design optimization.

Bergles-Rohsenow Young Investigator Award in Heat Transfer

KRIPA K. VARANASI

The Bergles-Rohsenow Young Investigator Award in Heat Transfer, established in 2003, recognizes a young engineer who is committed to pursuing research in heat transfer, and demonstrates the potential to make significant contributions in the field.

Kripa K. Varanasi, Ph.D., a Doherty Associate Professor in the department of mechanical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, is honored for developing a fundamental understanding of the role of surface chemistry and micro/ nanoscale morphology on thermal and fluidic transport during phase change at multiple length and time scales using environmental scanning electron microscope-based experimental techniques, leading to scalable engineering surfaces for industrial applications.

Prior to joining the faculty at MIT in January 2009, Dr. Varanasi was a research scientist and project leader for the Energy and Propulsion, and Nanotechnology programs at GE Research Center in Niskayuna, N.Y. While at GE, he was principal investigator for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's Advanced Electronics Cooling Program. Dr. Varanasi has filed more than 50 patents. He is commercializing some of the slippery coating technology under LiquiGlide.

Blackall Machine Tool and Gage Award

CANER EKSIOGLU

ZEKAI MURAT KILIC

YUSUF ALTINTAS

The Blackall Machine Tool and Gage Award was established in 1954 for the best paper or papers clearly concerned with, or related to, the design or application of machine tools, gages, or dimensional measuring instruments.

Caner Eksioglu, design engineer at Tusas Engine Industries-GE Aviation, TTC in Gebze, Kocaeli, Turkey; Zekai Murat Kilic, a Ph.D. candidate in the mechanical engineering department at The University of British Columbia (UBC) in Vancouver; and Yusuf Altintas, P.Eng., Ph.D., a professor at UBC, are recognized for the paper titled "Discrete-Time Prediction of Chatter Stability, Cutting Forces, and Surface Location Errors in Flexible Milling Systems," which was published in the December 2012 issue of ASME's Journal of Manufacturing Science and Engineering.

Since June 2012, Mr. Eksioglu has been working as a design engineer on commercial and marine gas turbine engines.

Mr. Kilic is currently studying large-scale machining processes. He helped revive the ASME Student Section at UBC.

Dr. Altintas joined UBC and founded the Manufacturing Automation Laboratory in 1986. A professor since 1996, he holds the NSERCP&WC industrial chair professorship, and he directs the NSERC CANRIMT.

Per Bruel Gold Medal for Noise Control and Acoustics

RICHARD H. LYON

The Per Bruel Gold Medal for Noise Control and Acoustics was established in 1987 in honor of Dr. Per Bruel, who pioneered the development of sophisticated noise and vibration measuring and processing equipment The medal recognizes eminent achievement and extraordinary merit in the field, including useful applications of the principles of noise control and acoustics to the art and science of mechanical engineering.

Richard H. Lyon, Ph.D., professor emeritus and senior lecturer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, president of RH Lyon Corp in Belmont, Mass., and consultant at Acentech Inc. in Cambridge, Mass., is recognized for pioneering contributions in the development of statistical energy approaches to analyzing vibrations in complex structural and acoustical systems, which continue to have a profound impact in the field of acoustics and noise control; and for contributions in the areas of sound quality assessment and machinery noise diagnostics.

Dr. Lyon's career spans nearly 60 years. He joined MIT in 1970 and retired in 1995. In 1976 he founded RH Lyon Corp, a product design and development company specializing in sound, vibrations, and dynamics.

Edwin F. Church Medal

WILLIAM M. WOREK

The Edwin F. Church Medal, established in 1972, is awarded annually to an individual who has rendered eminent service in increasing the value, importance, and attractiveness of mechanical engineering education.

William M. Worek, Ph.D., the associate dean of research and graduate studies, and professor of mechanical engineering at Stony Brook University, part of the State University of New York system, is honored for the development of new courses in combined heat and mass transfer, and the establishment of a master of energy engineering program that gives students the tools to design, execute, and manage new energy projects.

Dr. Worek is the past dean and Dave House Professor at Michigan Technological University in Houghton; and a past professor, department head, and director of the Energy Center at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). During his 25 years at UIC, Dr. Worek led one of the U.S. Department of Energy's Industrial Assessment Centers; was instrumental in forming the first Regional Application Center for Combined Heating and Power; and developed a unique, fully accredited non-thesis master of energy engineering program structured to meet the needs of working students.

Daniel C. Drucker Medal

YONGGANG HUANG

The Daniel C. Drucker Medal, established in 1997, is conferred in recognition of distinguished contributions to the field of applied mechanics and mechanical engineering through research, teaching, and service to the community over a substantial period of time.

Yonggang Huang, PhD., Joseph Cummings Professor at Northwestern University in Evanston, 111., is recognized for fundamental and applied contributions to the mechanics of materials and structures across multiple scales.

Dr. Huang joined the faculty at Northwestern in 2007. During the early years of his career, he focused on the advancement of mechanics theory and research in key areas across multiple scales. He was looking to integrate the disciplinary fields of mechanics and materials science by developing a clear understanding of the hierarchy of size scales that govern the material behavior. Since 2005 he has moved to a new research area: mechanics of stretchable and curvilinear electronics. Using mechanics principles, Dr. Huang and his collaborators have developed electronics with performance equal to established technologies--those using flat and rigid semiconductor wafers--but in lightweight, curvilinear, foldable, and stretchable formats that enable many new application possibilities.

Thomas A. Edison Patent Award

MOSHE SHOHAM

The Thomas A. Edison Patent Award, established in 1997, recognizes creativity of a patented device or process that has the potential of significantly enhancing some aspect of mechanical engineering.

Moshe Shoham, D.Sc, an endowed chair professor in the department of mechanical engineering and head of the Robotics Laboratory at Technion-Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa, is honored for the invention of a miniature surgical robot that is affixed to the patient's bone, thereby enabling accurate treatment; and for founding Mazor Robotics to manufacture the robot, which has guided 35,000 spine implants with zero cases of permanent nerve damage.

Dr. Shoham also founded Microbot Medical, which develops even smaller robots that are able to enter the human body for diagnostics and therapeutic tasks. From 1986 to 1990 he was an assistant professor and head of the Robotics Laboratory at Columbia University in New York.

Dr. Shoham serves as chair of IFToMM's Member Organization-Israel.

William T. Ennor Manufacturing Technology Award

JOHN W. SUTHERLAND

The William T. Ennor Manufacturing Technology Award was established in 1990 by the ASME Manufacturing Engineering Division and the Alcoa Company to recognize an individual or team for developing or contributing significantly to an innovative manufacturing technology, the implementation of which has resulted in substantial economic or societal benefits.

John W. Sutherland, Ph.D., professor and Fehsenfeld Family Head of Environmental and Ecological Engineering (EEE) at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Ind., is recognized for leadership and pioneering contributions in the development of dry or nearly dry machining technology, the characterization of environmental performance of manufacturing processes, and the creation of methodologies to promote the remanufacturing and recycling of end-of-life products.

Dr. Sutherland provides leadership in all EEE activities including undergraduate and graduate programs, nurturing the growth of a robust research enterprise, promoting effective collaborations, mentoring of faculty, and fostering collegewide learning, discovery, and engagement initiatives related to environmental engineering. Before joining Purdue he was at Michigan Technological University in Houghton (1991-2009).

Nancy DeLoye Fitzroy and Roland V. Fitzroy Medal

ANDREW VITERBI

The Nancy DeLoye Fitzroy and Roland V. Fitzroy Medal, established in 2011, recognizes pioneering contributions to the frontiers of engineering leading to a breakthrough(s) in existing technology or leading to new applications or new areas of engineering endeavor.

Andrew Viterbi, Ph.D., president of the Viterbi Group, a technical advisory and investment company in San Diego; and presidential chair professor at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, is honored for fundamental contributions to communication technology and theory, particularly the development of the Viterbi algorithm.

Dr. Viterbi is a co-founder and retired vice chairman and chief technical officer of QUALCOMM Incorporated in San Diego, and was a professor at the University of California in Los Angeles and San Diego. His principal research contribution, the Viterbi algorithm, is used in most mobile phones and satellite receivers, as well as in such diverse fields as magnetic recording, speech recognition, search engines, and DNA sequence analysis. More recently, he helped establish code division multiple access as the multiple access technology of choice for mobile communication.

Fluids Engineering Award

EPHRAIM GUTMARK

The Fluids Engineering Award was established by the Fluids Engineering Division in 1968. In 1978 it was elevated to an ASME award recognizing outstanding contributions over a period of years to the engineering profession and, in particular, to the field of fluids engineering through research, practice, and/or teaching.

Ephraim Gutmark, DSc, Ph.D., distinguished professor of aerospace engineering and Ohio Regents Eminent Scholar at the University of Cincinnati (UC), professor of otolaryngology at the UC Medical Center, and an affiliated professor at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) in Stockholm, is recognized for pioneering and outstanding contributions to the application of passive and active flow control to achieve quiet commercial and military aircraft engines, clean and stable combustion technology, aerodynamic flight effectors, and efficient propulsion systems.

Dr. Gutmark joined UC in 2000. His research interests include jet noise characterization and suppression, flow-structure interactions, advanced propulsion systems, combustion control, scramjet propulsion, pulse detonation engines, afterburners, turbochargers, turbine blades heat transfer and aerodynamics, flight control using fluidic actuators, biomedical fluid dynamics and aeroacoustics, and hydrodynamics for oil explorations. He is a co-inventor of 60 U.S. and EU patents.

Y.C. Fung Young Investigator Award

JONATHAN P. VANDE GEEST

The Y.C. Fung Young Investigator Award, established in 1985, recognizes a young investigator who is committed to pursuing research in bioengineering and has demonstrated significant potential to make substantial contributions to the field of bioengineering.

Jonathan P. Vande Geest, Ph.D., an associate professor at the University of Arizona (UA) in Tucson, is recognized for numerous accomplishments in the field of bioengineering including developing a well-funded Soft Tissue Biomechanics Laboratory (STBL), generating numerous publications, educating many undergraduate and graduate students, and contributing to the profession through service activities.

In 2005 Dr. Vande Geest accepted a tenure-track assistant professorship at UA, where he started the STBL. Since then he has secured more than $4 million in research funding from the American Health Assistance Foundation, the American Heart Association, the National Science Foundation (CAREER Award), and the National Institutes of Health. Since 2011 he is a tenured associate professor of aerospace and mechanical engineering, and biomedical engineering. To date, he has published 39 journal articles, one book chapter, and 75 conference abstracts.

Gas Turbine Award

CHRISTIAN EICHLER

GEORG MARTIN BAUMGARTNER

THOMAS SATTELMAYER

Established in 1963, the Gas Turbine Award recognizes outstanding contributions to the literature of combustion gas turbines or gas turbines thermally combined with nuclear or steam power plants. The award is sponsored by the ASME International Gas Turbine Institute.

Christian Eichler, Dr.-Ing., a research and development engineer in the heat transfer/combustion department at MTU Aero Engines in Munich; Georg Martin Baumgartner, a Dr.-Ing. candidate at the Lehrstuhl fur Thermodynamik of Technische Universitat Miinchen (TUM); and Thomas Sattelmayer, Dr.-Ing, chair for thermodynamics at Lehrstuhl fur Thermodynamik of TUM, are recognized for the paper titled "Experimental Investigation of Turbulent Boundary Layer Flashback Limits for Premixed Hydrogen-Air Flames Confined in Ducts" (GT2011-45362), presented at Turbo Expo 2011.

Dr. Eichler's doctoral work at TUM focused on flame flashback in premixed combustion devices with emphasis on hydrogen-containing fuels. He earned his Dr.-Ing. from TUM in 2011.

Mr. Baumgartner's research topic at the Lehrstuhl fur Thermodynamik of TUM deals with safe and reliable premixed combustion of hydrogen-rich fuels. One of his responsibilities is the coordination and leadership of the reactive flows research group at the Lehrstuhl.

Dr. Sattelmayer has been with TUM since 1997. His research interest is thermo-fluid dynamics. Prior to joining TUM he was affiliated with Asea Brown Boveri in Baden, Switzerland.

J.P. Den Hartog Award

PETER HAGEDORN

The J.P Den Hartog Award, established by the Design Engineering Division in 1987 and elevated to a Society award in 2010, recognizes lifetime contributions to the teaching and practice of vibration engineering.

Peter Hagedorn, D.Sc., head of the dynamics and vibrations group at the Chair of Numerical Methods at Technische Universitat Darmstadt in Germany, is honored for more than 40 years of tireless efforts to advance the understanding of vibrations, particularly on nonlinear and continuous systems; and for authoring numerous highly cited articles and 10 textbooks including six that focus on vibrations.

In his current position since September 2012, Dr. Hagedorn has been a full professor of mechanics at TU Darmstadt since 1974. He designed new curricula and further developed existing curricula, and his monographs and textbooks have been widely used. Throughout his career, he has made important contributions in the field of machine dynamics, analytical mechanics, engineering vibrations (linear and nonlinear), active control of vibrations, rotor dynamics, and mechatronics as it relates to exploiting nonlinear vibration effect.

Heat Transfer Memorial Award

The Heat Transfer Memorial Award was established in 1959 by the Heat Transfer Division. In 1974, it was elevated to an ASME award recognizing outstanding contributions to the field of heat transfer through teaching, research, practice, and design, or a combination of such activities.

ALDO STEINFELD--ART

Aldo Steinfeld, Ph.D.. a professor in the department of mechanical and process engineering at ETH Zurich and chair of renewable energy carriers, is recognized for distinguished leadership in the field of solar thermochemical fuel processing including fundamental research on radiative heat transfer in high-temperature reacting flows.

Dr. Steinfeld also directs the Solar Technology Laboratory at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Prior to joining PSI in 1992 and ETH in 1999, he was a research fellow at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel.

YOGENDRA JOSHI--GENERAL

Yogendra Joshi, PhD, professor and John M. McKenney and Warren D. Shiver Distinguished Chair at the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, is recognized for outstanding basic and applied contributions to multimode transport and melting from discrete heat sources; and for advancements in microfabricated thermal management devices for electronics cooling, multiobjective thermal design of microsystems, and reduced order thermal modeling of data centers.

Dr. Joshi joined the Georgia Tech faculty in 2001 and served as associate chair for graduate studies for the Woodruff School (2003-07). He is the author/co-author of more than 300 archival journal and conference publications.

ISSAM MUDAWAR--SCIENCE

Issam Mudawar, Ph.D., professor at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Ind., is recognized for pioneering theoretical and experimental research on phase change mechanisms and applications in energy, materials processing, aerospace propulsion and thermal management, and electronics cooling.

Dr. Mudawar joined the faculty at Purdue University in 1984 and founded both the Boiling and Two-Phase Flow Laboratory (BTPFL) and the Purdue University International Electronic Cooling Alliance (PUIECA). He is director of BTPFL and PUIECA, and, since 1993, is professor of mechanical engineering.

Mayo D. Hersey Award

MICHAEL M. KHONSARI

The Mayo D. Hersey Award, established in 1965, is bestowed for distinguished and continued contributions over a substantial period of time to the advancement of the science and engineering of tribology. Distinguished contributions may result from significant original research in one or more of the many scientific disciplines related to lubrication.

Michael M. Khonsari, Ph.D., Dow Chemical Endowed Chair in Rotating Machinery and professor of mechanical and industrial engineering at Louisiana State University (LSU) in Baton Rouge, is recognized for extensive contributions to tribology through work on thermal effects and thermal instability in lubrication and bearings, lubrication of bearings and gears, solid and powder lubrication, multiphase lubricating media, and micropolar fluids; and the application of tribology in rotating machinery.

At LSU since 1999, Dr. Khonsari also directs the Center for Rotating Machinery, which focuses on interdisciplinary research and development in close coordination with industry.

Patrick J. Higgins Medal

ROBERT J. DEBOOM

The Patrick J. Higgins Medal recognizes an individual who has contributed to the enhancement of standardization through contributions to the development and promotion of ASME codes and standards or Conformity Assessment Programs. It was established in 2007 in remembrance of ASME's past vice president of the standardization department.

Robert J. DeBoom, a consultant, is honored for outstanding leadership, extraordinary perseverance, and enthusiastic participation on numerous committees, which led to the enhancement of standardization in the field of measurement of fluid flow in closed conduits.

Mr. DeBoom worked at Sandia National Laboratories (1962-72) in Albuquerque, N.M., and the Dow Chemical Co. (1972-95) in Freeport, Texas. After retiring from Dow, he worked for Micro Motion, Inc. (MMI), a part of Emerson Electric Co., in Boulder, Colo. He continues to support MMFs efforts as a consultant since retiring in 2003. He has also continued doing standards work for ASME, the International Organization for Standardization, the American Petroleum Institute, and the American Gas Association.

Soichiro Honda Medal

JOHN C. WALL

The Soichiro Honda Medal recognizes an individual for an outstanding achievement or a series of significant engineering contributions in developing improvements in the field 0of personal transportation. This medal was established in 1983 in recognition of Soichiro Honda's exemplary achievements in the field of personal transportation.

John C. Wall, Sc.D., vice president and chief technical officer of Cummins Inc., based in Columbus, Ind., is honored for outstanding leadership in the research, design, development, and production of low-emission, fuel-efficient diesel engines, reflected extensively in commercial products; and for serving as a resource for environmental policy development within the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the California Air Resources Board.

Dr. Wall joined Cummins in 1986. In his current position since March 2000, he now leads an international technical organization with over 6,000 engineers in 17 major technical centers around the world, including the U.S., U.K., India, China, and Brazil.

Internal Combustion Engine Award

JOHN H. JOHNSON

The Internal Combustion Engine Award, established in 1966, is given in recognition of eminent achievement or distinguished contribution over a substantial period of time, which may result from research, innovation, or education in advancing the art of engineering in the field of internal combustion engines.

John H. Johnson, PhD., a presidential professor emeritus in the department of mechanical engineering-engineering mechanics at Michigan Technological University in Houghton, is recognized for leadership in innovative research in the modeling of diesel engine particulate filters and aftertreatment systems based on extensive experimental data; for dedication in educating graduate students on diesel engines; and for leading and participating in national studies of technology to reduce internal combustion engine fuel consumption.

Dr. Johnson joined the Michigan Tech faculty in 1970. In his laboratories, he has trained generations of heavy-duty engine engineers. He has served on numerous committees related to engine technology, engine emissions, and health effects including those of SAE International, the National Research Council, The Combustion Institute, the Health Effects Institute, and the Environmental Protection Agency.

Warner T. Koiter Medal

NORMAN A. FLECK

The Warner T. Koiter Medal was established in 1996 to recognize distinguished contributions to the field of solid mechanics with special emphasis on the effective blending of theoretical and applied elements, and on a high degree of leadership in the international solid mechanics community. The medal honors the late Dr. Warner T. Koiter, world-renowned authority in the field of solid mechanics, and it commemorates his vast contributions as research engineer and teacher. The medal was funded by the Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands.

Norman A. Fleck, CEng, Ph.D., professor of mechanics of materials in the engineering department and the founder/director of the Cambridge Centre at the University of Cambridge, U.K., is honored for combined theoretical and experimental contributions regarding the compressive failure of fiber reinforced composites; in the area of plasticity, particularly metal foams and lattice materials; and to the development of blast-resistant structures, all conducted within an international setting.

Dr. Fleck joined the Cambridge faculty in 1986. He was head of the Mechanics, Materials, and Design Division for 11 years (until 2009).

Robert E. Koski Medal

WAYNE J. BOOK

The Robert E. Koski Medal recognizes an individual who has advanced the art and practice of fluid power motion and control through education and/or innovation. It was established in 2007 by the Fluid Power Systems and Technology Division to honor Mr. Koski's contributions to the field of design engineering and dynamic systems and control.

Wayne J. Book, P.E., Ph.D., professor emeritus at the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, is honored for a lifetime of contributions and leadership in fluid power education and research related to motion control and the impact of operator interfaces on the control of hydraulic manipulation systems.

Dr. Book joined the faculty at Georgia Tech in 1974 and became professor emeritus in 2011. The core of his research and teaching interest is system dynamics and control, especially as applied to robotics, automation, and human interfaces typically actuated by fluid power. Patents in these areas have led to the formation of three companies. Current activities are sponsored by the National Science Foundation and industry through the Center for Compact and Efficient Fluid Power, formed through the collaboration of seven universities.

Frank Kreith Energy Award

JAMES E. SMITH

The Frank Kreith Energy Award was established in 2005 to honor an individual for significant contributions to a secure energy future with particular emphasis on innovations in conservation and/or renewable energy. Contributions may be through research, education, practice, or significant service to society that will lead to a sustainable energy future. The award was established by the Solar Energy and Advanced Energy divisions to honor Dr. Frank Kreith's contributions to solar energy and heat transfer, and was funded by Holocaust Settlement Claim No. 4931 for Nazi victims and by the Kreith family.

James E. Smith, CEng, Ph.D., a professor in the mechanical and aerospace engineering department and director of the Center for Industrial Research Applications at West Virginia University (WVU) in Morgantown, is honored for more than 30 years of significant contributions through the creation of energy related innovative technologies; the transfer of those technologies into the marketplace; and the use of that developmental process for the advanced training of students, staff, and colleagues.

Prior to joining the faculty at WVU in 1976, Dr. Smith was a research engineer for the U.S. Department of Energy.

Bernard F. Langer Nuclear Codes and Standards Award

BRYAN A. ERLER

The Bernard F. Langer Nuclear Codes and Standards Award was established in 1977 and is presented to an individual who has contributed to the nuclear power plant industry through the development and promotion of ASME nuclear codes and standards or the ASME Nuclear Certification Program.

Bryan A. Erler, P.E., president of Erler Engineering Ltd. in Chicago, is recognized for long-term contributions to the nuclear power plant industry through the development and promotion of ASME nuclear codes and standards.

Mr. Erler has been an executive in the nuclear power industry for more than 42 years, participating in and directing the design of numerous coal, gas, and nuclear power plants worldwide. He has been involved with ASME Nuclear Codes and Standards for 40 years. He has served on the ASME Board on Nuclear Codes and Standards since 1991. He is chair of the Board on Conformity Assessment, serves on the Council on Standards and Certification, and chairs the Task Group on Design Basis and Response to Severe Accidents.

Gustus L. Larson Memorial Award

WILLIAM P. KING

The Gustus L. Larson Memorial Award was established in 1974 and honors Gustus L. Larson, Fellow and founder of Pi Tau Sigma. It is awarded to the engineering graduate who has demonstrated outstanding achievement in mechanical engineering within 10 to 20 years following graduation.

William P. King, Ph.D., the Abel Bliss Professor in the departments of mechanical science and engineering, materials science and engineering, and electrical and computer engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is honored for outstanding achievements in mechanical engineering within 10 to 20 years following graduation.

Dr. King joined the faculty at Illinois in 2006 after serving as assistant professor (2002-06) at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. He has been founder, adviser, and board member at more than a dozen early stage technology companies specializing in nanotechnology, materials, and manufacturing. His efforts are changing the way new pharmaceuticals are developed, improving electronics and energy conversion materials, and providing useful measurements for the development of new technologies in the area of renewable energy. He has authored more than 170 journal articles and holds 20 patents.

H.R. Lissner Medal

MEHMET TONER

The H.R. Lissner Medal was established in 1977 and is presented for outstanding accomplishments in the area of bioengineering.

Mehmet Toner, Ph.D., the Helen Andrus Benedict Professor of Biomedical Engineering at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), Harvard Medical School in Boston, is recognized for inspirational efforts and far-reaching success in the training and mentoring of bioengineers; for seminal scientific contributions to cell and tissue preservation, tissue engineering, and micro/nanotechnology; and for visionary leadership of academic programs and technology centers.

Dr. Toner established the Bio MicroElectroMechanical Systems Resource Center at MGH and serves as its founding director. He has served on many national and international panels and review boards, and on the editorial board of various technical and scientific journals. Dr. Toner has published more than 250 original papers in archival journals and delivered more than 350 invited, keynote, and plenary presentations.

Machine Design Award

CLEMENT GOSSELIN

The Machine Design Award, established in 1958, recognizes eminent achievement or distinguished service in the field of machine design.

Clement Gosselin, P.Eng, Ph.D, professor in the department of mechanical engineering and Canada Research Chair in Robotics and Mechatronics at the Universite Laval in Quebec City, is recognized for distinguished contributions in the design of novel mechanical and mechatronic devices and systems; notably in connection with mechanical intelligence, which allows the effective control of underactuated systems such as robotic grippers.

Dr. Gosselin joined the Universite Laval in 1989. His research activities include kinematics and dynamics of parallel mechanisms and manipulators; mechanics of grasping and robot hand design; cable-driven parallel mechanisms; human-robot cooperation; trajectory planning of robotic manipulators; and modeling and control of complex robotic systems. He has directed many research initiatives including collaborations with several high-tech companies, and he has supervised the work of more than 100 graduate students. His research work has been the subject of two books, several patents, and numerous journal and conference publications.

Charles T. Main Student Section Award

The Charles T. Main Student Section Award was established in 1919 to recognize, at the Societywide level, an ASME student member whose leadership and service qualities have contributed, for a period of more than one year, to the programs and operation of a Student Section. In 1983, the award was expanded to include a second-place award.

LEILA C. ABOHARB--GOLD

Leila C. Aboharb, an undergraduate student at Drexel University in Philadelphia is recognized outstanding contributions to ASME including service as chair (2012-14) for both the Student Section at Drexel and the Student District Operating Board for District A; and for leadership roles in other student organizations as well as on university/department committees.

Ms. Aboharb is in her final year at Drexel University and will graduate in June 2014 with a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering. Her ASME efforts include the Philadelphia Section. She is a member of the Society of Women Engineers and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and is one of the founding volunteers for the Women in Aerospace and Technology Program.

SARAH ELYSE JOHNSON--SILVER

Sarah Elyse Johnson, a graduate student at Queen's University Belfast in the U.K., is recognized for dedicated service to the ASME Student Section at The University of Alabama (UA) in Tuscaloosa through leadership roles including chair; and for serving as a role model for students through academic achievement and active service within the campus community.

Ms. Johnson earned her bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering at UA in May 2013. She is currently pursuing a master's degree in advanced mechanical engineering at Queen's University Belfast through the George J. Mitchell Scholarship Program. During her four years at UA, she was heavily involved in ASME, the Society of Women Engineers, undergraduate research, and extracurricular engineering projects.

McDonald Mentoring Award

ABEL HERNANDEZ-GUERRERO

The McDonald Mentoring Award, established in 2007, recognizes the outstanding mentoring of other professionals by an engineer in industry, government, education, or private practice.

Abel Hernandez-Guerrero, Ph.D., a professor in the mechanical engineering department at the Universidad de Guanajuato in Salamanca, Mexico, is honored for outstanding contributions to the profession through the mentoring of individual students; the development of leadership seminars for ASME Student Section members; the mentoring of faculty that resulted in the establishment of numerous Student Sections in Mexico; and advocating mentoring programs through ASME committee activities.

Dr. Hernandez-Guerrero joined the faculty at the Universidad de Guanajuato in 1991. He has held various positions including mechanical engineering department head, and graduate and undergraduate programs chair; and he founded the ASME Student Section in 1992 and has continuously served as its advisor. He has also mentored faculty at other engineering schools in Mexico and, as a result, founded/ helped to establish at least 12 ASME Student Sections.

Melville Medal

AHMED E.E. KHALIL

ASHWANI K. GUPTA

KENNETH M. BRYDEN

SANG CHUN LEE

The Melville Medal was first awarded in 1927 and is the highest honor for the best original technical paper published in the ASME Transactions in the past two years.

Ahmed E.E. Khalil, a PhD. candidate at the University of Maryland (UMD) in College Park; Ashwani K. Gupta, Ph.D., D.Sc, distinguished university professor at UMD; Kenneth M. Bryden, Ph.D., an associate professor at Iowa State University (ISU) in Ames, and program director of Simulation, Modeling, and Decision Science (SMDS) at the U.S. Department of Energy Ames Laboratory; and Sang Chun Lee, Ph.D., professor at Kyungnam University (KU) in Changwon, South Korea, are recognized for the paper titled "Mixture Preparation Effects on Distributed Combustion for Gas Turbine Applications."

Mr. Khalil joined UMD's Combustion Laboratory in 2009 to pursue his doctoral degree and advanced to candidacy in 2011; he expects to receive his Ph.D. in December 2013.

Dr. Gupta has been with UMD since 1983. A professor of mechanical engineering since 1988, he was appointed distinguished university professor in 2008. He founded and is the director of the Combustion Laboratory.

Dr. Bryden has been a faculty member in the department of mechanical engineering at ISU since 1998, and since 2006 he has been serving as the program director of SMDS.

Dr. Lee is a tenured professor in the nano science and engineering department of KU. He has been a member of the chemistry and natural science departments since 1993. He also serves as the director of the KU Green Technology Center.

M. Eugene Merchant Manufacturing Medal of ASME/SME

BRYAN G. DODS

The M. Eugene Merchant Manufacturing Medal was established in 1986 by ASME and the Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME) to honor an exceptional individual who has had significant influence and responsibility for improving the productivity and efficiency of the manufacturing operation.

Bryan G. Dods, executive of manufacturing technology at General Electric Power & Water in Greenville, S.C., is honored for technical contributions and leadership in increasing assembly efficiency, improving superalloy machining productivity, increasing the impact of process modeling and simulation in the areas of preventive maintenance and manufacturing in general, and in promoting manufacturing education and research.

Mr. Dods began his career at McDonnell Douglas in St Louis in 1987 supporting the composites, sheet metal, and machining fabrication shops. Later, with the merger of Boeing, McDonnell Douglas, and Rockwell North

American, he was selected to lead the newly formed assembly manufacturing research and development team. In 2008 he was recruited to General Electric Power & Water to establish a global manufacturing technology organization.

Van C. Mow Medal

JEFFREY A. WEISS

The Van C. Mow Medal was established by the ASME Bioengineering Division in 2004 for initial bestowal in 2005. It is presented for significant contributions to the field of bioengineering through research, education, professional development, leadership in the development of the profession, mentoring of young bioengineers, and service to the bioengineering community.

Jeffrey A. Weiss, Ph.D., a professor of bioengineering and an adjunct professor of orthopaedics at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, is honored for seminal contributions to research in biomechanics related to fundamental structure-function relationships in musculoskeletal soft tissues, subject-specific modeling of joint mechanics, image-based biomechanics, the mechanics of angiogenesis, and the development and distribution of the FEBio software suite.

Dr. Weiss' research efforts have focused on the areas of experimental and computational biomechanics, primarily applied to the musculoskeletal and cardiovascular soft tissues. His lab develops, distributes, and supports FEBio, an open-source finite element software suite for computational biomechanics (www.febio.org). He has authored over 100 original research articles in scientific journals.

Nadai Medal

TSU-WEI CHOU

The Nadai Medal was established in 1976 to recognize significant contributions achievements which broaden the field of materials engineering.

Tsu-Wei Chou, PhD, Pierre S. du Pont Chair of Engineering at the University of Delaware (UD) in Newark, is honored for seminal contributions to fundamental studies of anisotropic, heterogeneous material systems, and nanocomposites; and for the combination of theoretical and experimental work that has enabled unique insights essential to the engineering of ceramic-, metal- and polymer-based advanced composite materials.

Dr. Chou joined the faculty at UD in 1969. His research interests are in materials science, applied mechanics, fiber composite materials, piezoelectric materials, and nanocomposites. He has made notable contributions in the application of analytical techniques to the study of a broad range of material problems; and has been a central figure in bringing composite materials, particularly fiber reinforced composites, from the laboratory into engineering practice.

Sia Nemat-Nasser

Early Career Award

The Sia Nemat-Nasser Early Career Award recognizes research excellence in experimental, computational or theoretical aspects of mechanics of materials by a young investigator within 10 years following receipt of a Ph.D. degree. Established by the Materials Division in 2008, it was elevated to a Society award in 2012.

THAO D. NGUYEN

Thao D. Nguyen, Ph.D., an assistant professor at The Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, is honored for outstanding contributions in both theoretical and experimental biomechanics, particularly work on the complex mechanics of the eye with applications to several conditions including glaucoma.

Dr. Nguyen joined the mechanical engineering department at The Johns Hopkins University in 2007. The broad theme of her research is the mechanics of soft adaptive materials and includes the remodeling of soft tissues and the stimuli-responsive behavior of polymers. She has worked collaboratively to investigate the role of the sclera and cornea in the development of glaucoma, and to develop a biomechanical model of the sclera and its effects on glaucoma.

Sia Nemat-Nasser

Early Career Award

Ting Zhu, Ph.D., an associate professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, is honored for outstanding research contributions to the nanomechanics of advanced engineering and energy materials through the synergistic application of fundamental theory, mechanics, materials physics, and multiscale modeling.

Dr. Zhu joined Georgia Tech as an assistant professor in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering in 2005. Currendy an associate professor in the Woodruff School, he holds a joint appointment in the School of Materials Science and Engineering. Recently he and his collaborators established a multiscale chemomechanics framework for simulating the electrochemically-induced mechanical degradation in high-capacity electrodes for lithium-ion batteries, which are crucially important to the mass market of electric vehicles; this research provides novel mechanistic insights and design guidelines for the development of durable energy storage materials.

Burt L. Newkirk Award

TAE HO KIM

The Burt L. Newkirk Award was established in 1976 and is presented to an individual who has made a notable contribution in tribology research search or development, as evidenced by important tribology publications prior to his or her 40th birthday.

Tae Ho Kim, Ph.D., an assistant professor at the School of Mechanical Systems Engineering of Kookmin University in Seoul, South Korea, is honored for significant contributions to the development of viable gas foil bearings for micro turbomachinery applications, particularly for computational models and comprehensive experimental data to improve the design and operation of gas bearings in oil-free machinery systems.

During his research career, Dr. Kim has co-authored 32 international and nine domestic (Korea) journal papers; and 33 international and 25 domestic (Korea) conference papers. He was appointed to his current position in September 2012. Previously he was at Texas A&M University (200709), and the Energy Mechanics Research Center of the Korea Institute of Science and Technology in Seoul (2009-12).

Old Guard Early Career Award

JARED B. GARRISON

The Old Guard Early Career Award was established in 1994 to help the young engineer bridge the gap between college and professional life. Its intent is to bring that individual closer to the activities of ASME by providing encouragement for graduating student members to upgrade to member and actively become involved in the work of the Society.

Jared B. Garrison, a graduate research assistant in the mechanical engineering department at The University of Texas at Austin (UT), is recognized for outstanding service and leadership in both the ASME Student Section at UT and the Central Texas Section (CTS); and for contributions to society through community outreach and research in alternative energy systems.

Mr. Garrison is working toward his Ph.D., which he hopes to earn in May 2014. His research involves modeling of electricity grids and incorporation of large scale energy storage to aid in higher penetration of renewable energy resources. His community service efforts have involved hands-on activities to foster excitement about science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) concepts.

Rufus Oldenburger Medal

GRAHAM CLIFFORD GOODWIN

The Rufus Oldenburger Medal was established in 1968 and is given in recognition of significant contributions and outstanding achievements in the field of automatic control through any of the following: education, research, development, innovation, and service to the field and profession.

Graham Clifford Goodwin, Ph.D., laureate professor in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at The University of Newcastle in New South Wales, Australia, is honored for pioneering contributions to adaptive control of time-varying and uncertain systems, to discrete time and stochastic adaptive control solutions, and to digital control solutions for real-world systems using the delta operator.

Since joining the faculty at The University of Newcastle in 1974, Dr. Goodwin has held various academic and administrative positions including director for the centres for Industrial Control Science and for Complex Dynamic Systems and Control; and chairman of UNAC Automation Pty. Ltd., Australia, a university spin-off company focused on commercializing advanced process control technology. He currently holds several research grants covering diverse areas including power electronics, 3G and 4G mobile communications, ambulance scheduling, and artificial pancreas development. He holds 16 international patents.

Performance Test Codes Medal

PATRICK M. MCHALE

The Performance Test Codes Medal, established in 1981, is awarded to an individual or individuals who have made outstanding contributions to the development and promotion of ASME Performance Test Codes, including the Supplements on Instruments and Apparatus.

Patrick M. McHale, P.E., vice president of McHale & Associates, Inc. in Redmond, Wash., is recognized for significant contributions to the development of numerous test codes to improve the efficiency of electrical generation; and for serving ASME and the profession during the past several decades with exemplary dedication on performance test code committees and on the board.

Mr. McHale has more than 50 years of management and engineering experience in performance testing, startup, plant betterment, operation and maintenance, and life extension of cogeneration, fossil-and nuclear-fueled, geothermal and hydroelectric generating stations, as well as U.S. Navy nuclear and marine power plants. He has ASME performance test code-level experience, testing plant components and overall plants since 1971. He served as president of McHale & Associates from 1995, when the company was formed, until 2008.

Pi Tau Sigma Gold Medal

RANDY H. EWOLDT

The Pi Tau Sigma Gold Medal was established in 1938 by Pi Tau Sigma in coordination with ASME to recognize outstanding achievements by a young engineering graduate in mechanical engineering within 10 years following receipt of the baccalaureate degree.

Randy H. Ewoldt, Ph.D., assistant professor of mechanical science and engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is honored for outstanding achievements in mechanical engineering within 10 years of graduation.

Dr. Ewoldt joined Illinois in 2011. His research group studies fluid mechanics and rheology, with applications to energy, advanced manufacturing, and bioinspired design including soft robotics. The group is developing design methods for rheologically-complex materials and reverse engineering techniques for complex fluids and soft matter using macroscopic rheological measurements to infer molecular, nanoscale, and microscale structure. He has published 22 articles in journals and conference proceedings, and has given nearly 30 invited lectures.

James Harry Potter Gold Medal

S.A. KLEIN

The James Harry Potter Gold Medal was established in 1980 in recognition eminent achievement or distinguished service in the application of the science of thermodynamics in mechanical engineering.

S.A. Klein, Ph.D., Bascom Ouweneel Professor of Mechanical Engineering and the director of the Solar Energy Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is recognized for eminent achievement in the development of a computer-aided analysis tool that has transformed thermodynamics education, supported research in complex systems across engineering disciplines, and enabled efficient engineering product development.

Dr. Klein joined the faculty at the UW-Madison in 1977. He developed the F-Chart method and associated computer tools for sizing solar energy systems. He is the primary author of the TRNSYS (TRaNsient SYStem) simulation program that is widely used for solar energy system studies. He developed FEHT, a finite element heat transfer program. For the past 20 years Dr. Klein has focused on the development of EES, a general engineering equation solving program that has had a major impact on the teaching of energy-related courses at UW-Madison and elsewhere.

Prime Movers Committee Award

ARUN PURI

JOHN DIBIASE

The Prime Movers Committee Award, established in 1954, recognizes outstanding contributions to the literature of thermal electric station practice or equipment which are available through public presentation and publication.

Arun Puri, a senior project manager at ESG-USA, LLC in Chattanooga, Tenn.; and John DiBiase, director of project management at Constellation Energy in Ontario, N.Y., are recognized for the paper titled "Main Generator Life Cycle Management," presented at the ASME 2012 Power Conference.

Currently Mr. Puri is engaged in the implementation of major projects and the deployment of flexible strategies to cope with beyond-design base external events (Fukushima projects). He holds five patents.

Mr. DiBiase is currently engaged in scope, schedule, and budget development for major capital projects at the Ginna Nuclear Power Plant including implementation of Fukushima and NFPA-805 (Performance-Based Standard for Fire Protection for Light Water Reactor Electric Generator Plants) initiatives.

Charles Russ Richards Memorial Award

A. GALIP ULSOY

The Charles Russ Richards Memorial Award, established in 1944, was named in honor of a founder of Pi Tau Sigma. It is given to an engineering graduate who has demonstrated outstanding achievements in mechanical engineering for 20 years or more following graduation.

A. Galip Ulsoy, Ph.D., the CD. Mote Jr. Distinguished University Professor of Mechanical Engineering and the William Clay Ford Professor of Manufacturing at the University of Michigan (UM) in Ann Arbor, is honored for outstanding achievements in mechanical engineering for 20 years or more following graduation.

Since joining the faculty at UM in 1980, Dr. Ulsoy has served in a number of positions including chair of the mechanical engineering department, founding director of the Ground Robotics Reliability Center, and deputy director of the Engineering Research Center for Reconfigurable Manufacturing Systems. He also served as director of the National Science Foundation's Division of Civil and Mechanical Systems (2003-05). He has made research contributions to the mechanics of axially moving elastic systems and to control system design; as well as to manufacturing, automotive, and other engineering systems.

Dr. Ulsoy has been a principal investigator or co-investigator for research projects funded at more than $90 million.

Safety Codes and Standards Medal

ANDREW P. JUHASZ

The Safety Codes and Standards Medical was established in 1986 to recognize contributions to the enhancement of public safety through the development and promotion of ASME safety codes and standards or through ASME safety accreditation activity.

Andrew P. Juhasz, manager of codes and standards at KONE Inc. in Moline, Ill., is honored for more than 35 years of dedicated service in the development and promotion of safety codes and standards for elevators and related equipment; for technical expertise and leadership within ASME's A17 community including 11 years as chair of the Electrical Committee; and for continuing to represent the elevator industry's interests within ASME as well as other organizations.

Prior to assuming his current position in 1998, Mr. Juhasz was a senior electrical engineer in research and development at Montgomery Elevator Co./KONE Inc. In addition to his ASME efforts, he serves on the National Elevator Industry, Inc.'s Central Code Committee, is a member of National Fire Protection Association, and is an associate member of the International Association of Electrical Inspectors.

R. Tom Sawyer Award

ANTHONY J. STRAZISAR

The R. Tom Sawyer Award, established in 1972, is bestowed upon an individual who has made important contributions toward the advancement of the gas turbine industry, as well as the ASME International Gas Turbine Institute (IGTI), over a substantial period of time.

Anthony J. Strazisar, Ph.D., is recognized for sustained outstanding contributions in experimental turbomachinery fluid dynamics that have had a major impact on gas turbine technology; and for dedicated service and lasting contributions to IGTI.

Dr. Strazisar retired from the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland in 2012 after 36 years of service. He was an active researcher in the area of gas turbine compressor aerodynamics for 27 years and collaborated on 40 publications. In 2003 he was appointed chief scientist. His renowned contributions include pioneering work on laser Doppler anemometry measurements in turbomachinery; and innovative work on the effect of roughness on transonic fan performance, the study of compressor stall and its management, and the experimental investigation of fluid injection and stall delay.

Milton C. Shaw Manufacturing Research Medal

I.S. JAWAHIR

The Milton C. Shaw Manufacturing Research Medal, established in 2009, recognizes significant fundamental contributions to the science and technology of manufacturing processes.

I.S. Jawahir, Ph.D., a professor of mechanical engineering, James F. Hardymon Endowed Chair in Manufacturing Systems, and the director of the Institute for Sustainable Manufacturing at the University of Kentucky (UK) in Lexington, is recognized for significant contributions to the advancement of manufacturing science and engineering through the development of predictive performance models and optimization techniques for machining operations such as turning, milling, and drilling; and through the introduction of environmentally benign, sustainable dry, near-dry, and cryogenic methodologies.

Dr. Jawahir joined UK in 1990. He has received significant research funding from U.S. federal agencies and from major manufacturing companies. He has produced over 280 publications, and delivered 36 keynote papers at international conferences and more than 160 invited presentations in 28 countries. Dr. Jawahir is editor-in-chief of the International Journal of Sustainable Manufacturing and technical editor of the Journal of Machining Science and Technology.

Ben C. Sparks Medal

ROBERT WARRINGTON

SCOTT G. DANIELSON

ALLAN T. KIRKPATRICK

WALTER W. LAITY

The Ben C. Sparks Medal, established in 1990, recognizes eminent service by an individual or collaborative team in promoting innovative, authentic, practice-based, engineering design/build experiences in undergraduate mechanical engineering or mechanical engineering technology education.

Robert Warrington, Ph.D., director of the Institute for Leadership and Innovation at Michigan Technological University in Houghton; Scott G. Danielson, P.E., Ph.D., associate dean at Arizona State University (ASU) in Mesa; Allan T. Kirkpatrick, P.E., Ph.D., a professor of mechanical engineering at Colorado State University (CSU) in Fort Collins; and Walter W. Laity, P.E., Ph.D., are recognized for outstanding leadership and service on the Vision 2030 project, which has reshaped the strategy of ASME Education and sparked a move toward a more flexible, creative, industry-practice-oriented mechanical engineering; and accented the inherent value of mechanical engineering technology education in the broad-spectrum mechanical engineering field.

Dr. Warrington joined Michigan Tech in 1996 as dean of engineering and served in that capacity until 2007. He is chair of ASME's Vision 2030 Task Force: Creating the Future of Mechanical Engineering Education.

Dr. Danielson's broad-based experience encompasses both industry and academia. He has been with ASU since 1999. On the ASME Vision 2030 Task Force, he serves as co-editor of the group's written materials.

Dr. Kirkpatrick joined CSU in 1980. He served as department head for 10 years and as the accreditation coordinator for the CSU College of Engineering for five years. He is co-editor on the ASME Vision 2030 Task Force.

Dr. Laity (1940-2013) commenced his career at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Wash., in 1977; he retired in 2008. The foundation for the current ASME Board on Education's Vision 2030 project was laid under his leadership.

Ruth and Joel Spira Outstanding Design Educator Award

DOUGLASS J. WILDE

The Ruth and Joel Spira Outstanding Design Educator Award was established as a division award in 1998. The award was elevated to an ASME award in 2001 to recognize a person who exemplifies the best in furthering engineering design education through vision, interactions with students and industry, scholarship, and impact on the next generation of engineers, and a person whose action serves as a role model for other educators to emulate.

Douglass J. Wilde, Ph.D., professor emeritus of mechanical engineering and, by courtesy, chemical engineering at Stanford University in California, is honored for pioneering educational contributions in design optimization, computational geometry, and the application of personality theory to design team formation and organization through numerous books and the mentoring of several generations of influential academics.

Dr. Wilde joined the faculty at Stanford in 1963; since 1991 he has been professor emeritus. He has authored a number of books including Teamology: The Construction and Organization of Effective Teams (Springer, 2009) and Jung's Personality Theory Quantified (Springer, 2011).

Spirit of St. Louis Medal

DAVID A. PETERS

The Spirit of St. Louis Medal was established in 1929 by Philip D. Ball, ASME members, and citizens of St. Louis. It is awarded annually for meritorious service in the advancement of aeronautics and astronautics. Contributions from Northrop Grumman have been made to supplement the Medal endowment.

David A. Peters, P.E., Ph.D., McDonnell Douglas Professor of Engineering at Washington University (WU) in St. Louis, is honored for outstanding foundational contributions to the development of accurate and tractable models that underlie the design and safety of helicopters, and the computational implementation of these algorithms in flight simulators used worldwide; and for fundamental contributions to modern helicopter design.

Dr. Peters served as chair of mechanical engineering at WU for 13 years. His prior career experience includes McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Corporation in St. Louis, the U.S. Army Research and Development Laboratory in Moffett Field, Calif., and the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. At Georgia Tech, Dr. Peters was the founding director of the NASA Space Grant Consortium and still serves as the associate director of the Georgia Tech Center of Excellence for Rotorcraft Technology.

Student Section Advisor Award

RICHARD A. MERZ

The Student Section Advisor Award, established in 1990 as the Faculty Advisor Award and renamed in 2000, is presented to an ASME member who is a current or former Student Section advisor whose leadership and service qualities have contributed, for at least three years, to the programs and operation of a Student Section of the Society. The endowment for the award was provided by the Old Guard Committee.

Richard A. Merz, P.E., Ph.D., an associate professor of mechanical engineering at Lafayette College in Easton, Pa., is recognized for more than three decades of service advising Lafayette College's ASME Student Section, inspiring students through design projects and competitions, enriching education beyond the classroom and instilling a thirst for lifelong learning, fostering joint events with ASME's Anthracite-Lehigh Valley Section, and promoting continued membership and active participation in the Society.

Dr. Merz joined the faculty at Lafayette College in 1981. An ASME Fellow, he has been a member of the Society since 1969, and has held close to 40 positions at the local, regional/ district and national levels.

J. Hall Taylor Medal

DAVID L. BERGER

The J. Hall Taylor Medal was established in 1965 by the ASME Codes and Standards Board as a gift from Taylor Forge and Pipe Works to commemorate the pioneering work of J. Hall Taylor in the standardization of industrial products and safety codes for their usage. It is awarded for distinguished service or eminent achievement in the codes and standards area pertaining to the broad fields of piping and pressure vessels.

David L. Berger, a senior staff engineer/scientist at PPL Generation, LLC in Allentown, Pa., is recognized for extraordinary leadership and professionalism in consensus building and global recognition of ASME codes and standards for pressure equipment; and for dedication to the integrity of the ASME codes and standards development process.

Mr. Berger's career with PPL has focused on process safety in fossil power plants. His primary responsibility is to manage inspection of boilers, pressure vessels, and piping. He enjoys the synergy between his inspection work at PPL (since 1978) and his volunteer role on ASME committees (since 1986).

Technical Communities Globalization Medal

YOGI GOSWAMI

The Technical Communities Globalization Medal, established in 2011, is awarded to an ASME member who has demonstrated a sustained level of outstanding achievement in the promotion of international activity related to mechanical engineering.

Yogi Goswami, P.E., Ph.D., distinguished university professor at the University of South Florida (USF) in Tampa, is honored for uniquely influencing the development and use of solar energy around the world through education, policy advice to various governments, the organization of international conferences, service as editor-in-chief of solar energy journals, and through keynote and plenary lectures on global energy topics at major international conferences.

Prior to joining the faculty at USF in 2005, he was professor and director of the Solar Energy and Energy Conversion Laboratory at the University of Florida in Gainesville (1990-2005); and held teaching positions at the North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University in Greensboro (1977-90). He is author/editor of 16 books and has published more than 300 papers. He holds 18 patents.

Robert Henry Thurston Lecture Award

JOHN A. ROGERS

The Robert Henry Thurston Lecture Award was established in 1925 in honor of ASME's first president. It provides an opportunity for a leader in pure and/or applied science or engineering to present to the Society a lecture that encourages stimulating thinking on a subject of broad interest to engineers. The Robert Henry Thurston Lecture Award was elevated to a Society award in 2000.

John A. Rogers, PhD., Swanlund Chair Professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is honored for fundamental and applied contributions to materials, mechanics designs, and assembly techniques for stretchable/flexible electronic systems.

Dr. Rogers joined Illinois in 2003. In his current position he has appointments in the departments of materials science and engineering, mechanical science and engineering, electrical and computer engineering, bioengineering, and chemistry. He is also director of the Seitz Materials Research Laboratory. He served as director of a National Science Foundation-funded Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center on nanomanufacturing (2009-12).

Timoshenko Medal

RICHARD M. CHRISTENSEN

The Timoshenko Medal was established in 1957 and is conferred annually in recognition of distinguished contributions to the field of applied mechanics. Instituted by the Applied Mechanics Division, it honors Stephen P. Timoshenko, world-renowned authority in the field, and it commemorates his contributions as author and teacher.

Richard M. Christensen, D.Eng., professor research emeritus at Stanford University in California, is recognized for numerous distinguished contributions to applied mechanics including the theory of heterogeneous solids, composite materials, and laminated plates; the geometry of ultra low density materials; the viscoelasticity and rheology of polymers and non-Newtonian fluids; and the failure of isotropic and anisotropic materials.

Dr. Christensen joined the Stanford faculty in the aeronautics and astronautics department in 1992; now emeritus, he is still active. His long career has included positions in industry at General Dynamics, Space Technology Laboratories, and Shell Development; at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; and in academia at the University of California (Berkeley and Davis) and Washington University in St. Louis. He founded and runs a very active technical website (www.FailureCriteria.com) on materials failure.

Worcester Reed Warner Medal

SINGIRESU SAMBASIVA RAO

The Worcester Reed Warner Medal was established in 1930 and is awarded for outstanding contributions to the permanent literature of engineering. Contributions may be single papers, treatises or books, or a series of papers.

Singiresu Sambasiva Rao, Ph.D., a professor at the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla., is honored for outstanding contributions to the permanent literature of engineering over the past 35 years, particularly for highly popular books on engineering optimization, reliability-based design, vibrations, finite element method, and numerical methods; and numerous trendsetting research papers.

Dr. Rao joined the University of Miami in 1998 and served as chair of the department of mechanical and aerospace engineering until 2011. He has made several pioneering contributions in the areas of engineering optimization and reliability; and fuzzy, interval, and evidence-based methods. Since 1995 he has been demonstrating the application of evidence theory (Dempster-Shafer theory) to optimization and uncertainty analysis of engineering systems. Dr. Rao has published several books that are being used as textbooks at hundreds of universities throughout the world. He has also published 180 journal papers as well as 150 papers in conference proceedings.

George Westinghouse Gold Medal

YIANNIS A. LEVENDIS

The George Westinghouse Gold Medal was established to recognize eminent achievement or distinguished service in the power field of mechanical engineering. To perpetuate the value of the rich contribution to power development made by George Westinghouse, honorary member and 29th president of the Society, the Westinghouse Educational Foundation established the Gold Medal in 1952

Yiannis A. Levendis, Ph.D., College of Engineering Distinguished Professor in the department of mechanical and industrial engineering at Northeastern University in Boston, is honored for numerous in-depth contributions to the field of combustion of liquid and solid fossil and alternative fuels under conventional and oxy-fuel conditions, as well as to the formation mechanisms of generated pollutants and to their control; and for educating thousands of students in environmentally-benign power-generation-related subjects.

Dr. Levendis joined the faculty at Northeastern University in 1988. His current research deals with topics related to combustion, alternative energy sources, air pollution and acid rain prevention, incineration of municipal wastes, engine performance and emissions, combustion diagnostics and pyrometry, polymers, materials development, and polymeric coatings.

Arthur L. Williston Medal

CASSANDRA NICOLE HAWLEY

The Arthur L. Williston Medal, established in 1954, recognizes the best paper submitted on a subject chosen to challenge the abilities of engineering students. The annual competition is open to any ASME student member or member who received a baccalaureate degree within two years of the submission deadline.

Cassandra Nicole Hawley, a student at the United States Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn., is recognized for the paper titled "Tackling Transit Today."

Cadet Hawley plans to graduate in May 2014 as a commissioned officer with a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering. Her future hope in the United States Coast Guard is to lead as an engineering officer and helicopter pilot. Earlier this year she had the honor of being a company guidon bearer, the highest command position a junior can hold, and was responsible for the training and well-being of 29 freshmen. She is a member of the Society of Women Engineers.

Henry R. Worthington Medal

STEVEN MICHAEL TIPTON

The Henry R. Worthington Medal, established in 1980, is bestowed for eminent achievement in the field of pumping machinery including, but not limited to, research, development, design, innovation, management, education, or literature.

Steven Michael Tipton, P.E., Ph.D., Frank W. Murphy Distinguished Professor of Mechanical Engineering at The University of Tulsa (TU) in Oklahoma, is honored for important achievements in developing experimental testing systems to reproduce the unique loading experienced by highly pressurized coiled tubing, and analytical models to characterize plasticity and fatigue behavior, both of which have promoted the acceptance of coiled tubing as a safe, efficient technology for worldwide oilfield operations.

For 29 years Dr. Tipton has taught undergraduate and graduate courses in the areas of mechanical design, design projects, mechanics of materials, and fatigue and fracture at TU. He conducts research on fatigue, mechanical design, and coiled tubing mechanics. He established a formal coiled tubing research program at TU in 1996 that grew into an ongoing consortium in 2000.

S.Y. Zamrik PVP Medal

WILLIAM J. BEES

The Pressure Vessel and Piping Medal was established in 1980. Renamed the S.Y. Zamrik PVP Medal in 2010, it is bestowed for outstanding contributions in the field of pressure vessel and piping technology including, but not limited to, research, development, teaching, and significant advancements of the state of the art.

William J. Bees, P.E., consultant, is recognized for significant contributions to pressure vessel design technologies through career efforts, and through diverse ASME activities ranging from developing conference sessions and serving as Pressure Vessels and Piping Division chair to serving on ASME codes and standards committees, as group leader for the Pressure Technology Group, and as a member of the Knowledge and Community Sector.

Mr. Bees has been contributing to the pressure vessel design field for nearly 50 years. In 2006 he retired from The Babcock & Wilcox Company in Barberton, Ohio, after 43 years working in the nuclear equipment engineering department. Currently he provides consulting services to the Engineering Mechanics Group of Parsons in Aiken, S.C., and to three Babcock & Wilcox entities.
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Title Annotation:CELEBRATE ENGINEERING
Publication:Mechanical Engineering-CIME
Geographic Code:1U3IL
Date:Nov 1, 2013
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