Printer Friendly

APPLE COMPUTER PART OF WINNING TEAM TO EARN A MAJOR SCHOOL DESIGN AWARD

 APPLE COMPUTER PART OF WINNING TEAM
 TO EARN A MAJOR SCHOOL DESIGN AWARD
 BOLTON LANDING, N.Y., July 9 /PRNewswire/ -- Apple Computer Inc. and its learning research and development project, Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow (ACOT), as members of the National Alliance for Restructuring Education, have today won a multi-million dollar grant to design "break-the-mold" schools in Vermont, New York, Kentucky, Arkansas, Washington, Pennsylvania and California.
 The grant, funded by private donations, was awarded by the New American Schools Development Corp. to the National Alliance, a new coalition of schools and states working together with the National Center on Education and the Economy, Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow and Apple Computer Inc., the Center for the Study of Social Policy, the Commission on the Skills of the American Workforce, the Harvard Project on Effective Services, the Learning Research and Development Center at the University of Pittsburgh, the National Alliance of Business, the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, the New Standards Project, the Public Agenda Foundation, and Xerox Corp.
 The grant to the National Alliance for Restructuring Education is one of 11 grants awarded today by NASDC during a news conference in Washington D.C.
 The Alliance's winning proposal embraces a systemic approach to creating radically different methods of instruction, teacher training, assessment, technology integration, quality management practices, public involvement and health care services than are currently operating at today's schools. The National Center for Education and the Economy (NCEE) of Rochester, N.Y. will administer the grant for its other Alliance members.
 John Sculley, Apple's chairman and chief executive officer and chairman of the NCEE Board of Trustees, said, "It is vital in restructuring schools that we take a systemic approach to solving problems. For Apple, this award is a significant opportunity to apply on a national level the insights we've gained about learning and teaching from the research done by our Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow project and its associated universities."
 "We are very excited about helping other people apply the lessons we've learned over the years," said David Dwyer, PhD., ACOT project manager and principal scientist. "We are extremely impressed by the high level of commitment of the teachers and administrators we are working with and although we know the challenge to create "break the mold" schools is daunting we have high confidence in the abilities of these people. We will be providing these schools with the most advanced technologies so their students will truly have the advantage of learning with the most innovative tools available," Dwyer said.
 The total amount of the initial design grant will be determined later this month. The Alliance sought a grant of $3 million for the 1992-93 school year will enable the Alliance to begin planning the curriculum, training and research at three schools each in Vermont, Kentucky and the city of Rochester, N.Y. The Alliance is seeking a total of $20 million for a five-year period to extend its work to schools in San Diego, Calif., Pittsburgh, Pa., White Plains, N.Y., Arkansas, and Washington.
 Apple Computer will provide the expertise in technology integration, teacher training and education research gained by Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow (ACOT) project during the past seven years as well as five full-time ACOT staff members to provide direct support. In addition, Apple, in the grant's first year, will provide significant contributions of computers and software and staff development time for teachers.
 If the New American Schools Development Corp. funding extends through 1995, the Alliance plans on creating 243 'break-the-mold' schools in those communities and states.
 "We seek to turn our schools into places in which all students, without exception, are expected to meet national achievement standards benchmarked to
the highest in the world. Our proposal is not about creating another handful of successful schools. It is instead about something we believe is much harder: the creation of systems that will foster these schools, that will allow them to grow and multiply to the point where every school can 'break the mold.' " said Marc Tucker, NCEE president.
 Without waiting for NASDC funding, the National Alliance for Restructuring Education has been moving forward to apply and connect the comprehensive strategies it has developed. This week, for example, 225 people from the participating schools and communities, along with their non-school Alliance members are meeting here in upstate New York to create "strategic blueprints" for how to reform their schools. The 'builders' are teams of teachers, administrators, state officials and community members who will design and implement the changes. They are working side by side with leading experts in curriculum, assessment, education research, technology, social services, teacher training, management, public opinion, community organizing and workforce skills.
 Sharing a commitment to comprehensive education change, the Alliance partners were carefully chosen as representing the best in America in each of several arenas requiring redesign, Tucker said.
 The proposal of the Alliance contained six major design tasks, all of them inextricably linked. They are:
 -- Defining student outcomes that are wanted and creating good measures of progress toward those outcomes. The nation won't get high performance unless it is well defined and accurately measured. The partners are committed to setting international benchmark standards for student performance, to designing advanced forms of student performance assessment, to abandoning the current system of minimum standards and to bringing all students up to a high standard of intellectual accomplishment.
 -- Connecting schools to the curriculum and instructional resources they need to perform to high standards. Student performance won't change unless there is new curriculum much richer in content, teacher's teach differently, powerful new technologies are harnessed to the task, and the needs of students not going to college right after high school get the same priority as those who are.
 -- Improving the planning, financing and delivery of health and human services to more effectively support student learning. What schools do will not matter much to millions of kids who are in danger of failing before they even show up for their first day of school. The way that health and human services programs work and relate to schools must be redesigned so that the capacity of families to support their children's education will be strengthened


and those children will not fail in school because their health and social needs have gone unmet.
 -- Adapting for education the principles of the total quality movement as they have evolved recently in the best American firms. An organizational revolution is required if the schools are to be managed for high performance. The Alliance plans to involve the world's leading corporations in applying the principles of total quality management to education, from the school to the school district to the state department of education.
 -- Identifying those strategies that will foster sustained public support for world-class student performance and the revolutionary changes in policy and practice needed to produce it. The radical changes necessary will not take place if the American people are not behind them. The Alliance plans to use the most effective tools in the arsenal of modern media and the best of community organizing methods to involve the public in this reform program.
 -- Integrating these new designs into the schools and moving from a few transformed schools, districts and states to many.
 -0- 7/9/92
 NOTE: Apple and the Apple logo are registered trademarks of Apple Computer Inc. ACOT is a service mark of Apple Computer Inc.
 /CONTACT: Mary Fallon, 408-974-2941; or Bill Keegan, 408-974-5460, both of Apple Computer Inc./ CO: Apple Computer Inc. ST: California IN: CPR SU:


JL -- SJ003 -- 7935 07/09/92 15:14 EDT
COPYRIGHT 1992 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Jul 9, 1992
Words:1256
Previous Article:PROCTER & GAMBLE ANNOUNCES EXECUTIVE CHANGES
Next Article:RAYTHEON'S SECOND QUARTER EARNINGS INCREASE 9.0 PERCENT
Topics:


Related Articles
APPLE ANNOUNCES CROSSROADS 3 EDUCATION GRANTS RECIPIENTS
APPLE SIGNS MAJOR CONSUMER ELECTRONICS AND OFFICE PRODUCTS RETAILERS TO PARTICIPATE IN SPECIAL CONSUMER MARKET PROGRAM
STUDENTS BRING 'COMPUTERS OF THE FUTURE' DESIGNS TO APPLE
FOUR APPLE PRODUCTS WIN INDUSTRIAL DESIGN EXCELLENCE AWARDS
APPLE COMPUTER AND HOUGHTON MIFFLIN CO. ANNOUNCE ARPA FUNDING
MILWAUKEE PUBLIC SCHOOL DISTRICT PURCHASES MORE THAN 3,000 POWER MACINTOSH 5200/75 LC COMPUTERS AS A KEY ELEMENT OF ITS TECHNOLOGY PLAN
KINDERCARE INSTALLS 4,000 APPLE MACINTOSH PERFORMAS IN CHILD CARE CENTERS TO PROMOTE COMPUTER LEARNING
SEARS HELPS SCHOOLS EARN POINTS TOWARD COMPUTER HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE AS PART OF APPLE'S 'BRING LEARNING HOME' INITIATIVE
APPLE TIES IN WITH 20TH CENTURY FOX 'INDEPENDENCE DAY'
Cobb County School District Awards Digital $6.5M Network Deployment Contract

Terms of use | Copyright © 2017 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters