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APPLE COMPUTER ANNOUNCES QUICKRING ARCHITECTURE FOR HIGH-SPEED DATA TRANSFERS

 APPLE COMPUTER ANNOUNCES QUICKRING ARCHITECTURE
 FOR HIGH-SPEED DATA TRANSFERS
 SAN JOSE, Calif., May 11 /PRNewswire/ -- Apple Computer Inc. (NASDAQ: AAPL) today announced the QuickRing architecture. QuickRing will provide high-speed data transfer support for NuBus-based Apple Macintosh personal computers. Connecting specialized NuBus cards together is critical to the development of high-end video applications, involving multimedia and HDTV, as well as high-speed networking, multiprocessing, and graphics acceleration.
 QuickRing was jointly developed by Apple's Advance Technology Group, National Semiconductor, Molex, Inc., and Beta Phase, Inc. The announcement was made during the opening of Apple's 1992 Worldwide Developers Conference.
 QuickRing fulfills the need for a cost-effective way to physically connect multiple NuBus expansion cards. Linking these specialized NuBus cards has been a technical challenge for companies trying to develop next generation applications that require accessing large amounts of data.
 The components (controller chip and connectors) to implement QuickRing are expected to be available to Apple developers in early 1993.
 QuickRing provides data transfer rates in excess of 200 megabyte/second. This is many times faster than the speeds currently possible using conventional expansion bus technologies. For example, very high-speed data transfer is necessary for delivering studio quality video images to a user's screen. Today's expansion buses cannot handle the large amounts of information necessary to display such complex images.
 "We see QuickRing as the equivalent of a super data pathway with a PC's price tag. It lets our developers design next generation multimedia systems that are compatible with today's Macintosh," said Shane Robison, director of systems technologies, in Apple's Advanced Technology Group.
 "QuickRing represents two breakthroughs," said Robison. "First, it overcomes the limits of today's buses by using point-to-point signal transmission. Second, QuickRing is a price/performance breakthrough: developers can implement QuickRing for just one- tenth the cost of conventional solutions at the same performance level."
 QuickRing is part of Apple's planned architecture for real-time data stream management. To enable its developers to exploit this architecture, Apple is working with other companies to supply the key hardware components:
 -- A controller chip was designed and manufactured by National Semiconductor, one of the world's leading suppliers of bus-driver solutions.
 -- A new interconnect system was specially designed for QuickRing by Beta Phase, an interconnect technology leader. The connector system will be manufactured by Beta Phase and Molex, an industry leader in interconnect design.
 The challenge for the controller chip company was to develop very high-speed signaling circuitry using conventional manufacturing methods. In addition, the circuitry had to integrate a VLSI circuit and be produced in high volume and for a low cost.
 "We believe that our expertise in interfacing mixed analog and digital signal designs and our understanding of transmission line physics gave us the right qualifications to develop this solution," said Keith Jackson, vice president, National Semiconductor's Interface Systems Group.
 "National is pleased to be part of QuickRing's development," Jackson added. "We believe QuickRing has the potential to bring workstation power and broadcast-quality video to Macintosh users."
 The QuickRing interconnect system is capable of signal transmission rates up to 10 times faster than traditional expansion card connectors. Traditional connector systems fail at these speeds. So, the second challenge of the QuickRing development was the physical connection of the NuBus cards.
 Due to the expertise of Beta Phase in high-speed/high-density connector design, and because Molex is one of the world's largest manufacturers of connectors, they were selected as the connector suppliers.
 "The QuickRing connectors are a low-cost evolution of technology we developed for supercomputer companies such as Cray Research Inc.," said John Krumme, CEO, Beta Phase.
 "We are pleased to bring our unique interconnect technology to Apple for this exciting market opportunity."
 "Molex is pleased to be a part of this innovative program to significantly expand the capabilities of Apple's Macintosh computers," said Jim Fleischhacker, president, Molex's U.S. Data Comm Division. "It is exciting to see what can happen when experts from several different disciplines work together to achieve a common goal. Being involved in this project from its inception is ideal for Molex because it allows us to incorporate all of our quality systems right from the beginning."
 Developers interested in QuickRing may inquire via AppleLink to QUICKRING, or write to QuickRing, Apple Computer Inc., Mail Stop: 76-4K, 20450 Stevens Creek Blvd., Cupertino, CA 95014.
 Apple Computer Inc. develops, manufactures, and markets computer technology for use in business, education, and government. A recognized pioneer and innovator in the personal computer industry, Apple does business in more than 120 countries.
 National Semiconductor designs, manufactures and markets high- performance semiconductor products. Headquartered in Santa Clara, Calif., the company is a global leader in mixed analog and digital technologies.
 Beta Phase Inc. develops, manufactures and markets high-speed, high-density interconnection systems for supercomputer, computer, medical instrumentation, and aerospace electronics applications. Beta Phase is recognized as a pioneer and innovator in electronic connector technology. Beta Phase is a public company located in Menlo Park, Calif.
 Molex Inc., based in Lisle, Ill., is a Fortune 500 company that designs and manufactures electrical/electronic and fiber optic interconnection systems, ribbon cable, switches, and application tooling. Sales for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1991 were $708 million.
 -0- 5/11/92
 NOTE: Apple, the Apple logo, and Macintosh are registered trademarks; QuickRing, and NuBus are trademarks of Apple Computer Inc.
 /CONTACT: John Cook of Apple Computer Inc., 408-974-3145; Margaret Mehling of National Semiconductor, 408-721-2639; Susan Armitage of Molex Inc., 708-969-4747; or Chuck Byer of Beta Phase Inc., 415-853-3800/
 (AAPL) CO: Apple Computer Inc. ST: California IN: CPR SU: PDT


MM -- SJ008 -- 8417 05/11/92 08:18 EDT
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