Printer Friendly

AND, IN THE FIRSTS/FACTS/FLUBS CATEGORY, ...

Byline: Entertainment News Wire

Billy Crystal is returning to host the show for the sixth time. The most frequent Oscar host is Bob Hope. He performed the task solo seven times and co-hosted 10 times.

Hope has never won an acting Oscar at the ceremony (``or, as it's called at our house, Passover''), but he has taken home four honorary awards and the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award.

Number of voting members of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences: 5,371.

First president of the academy: Douglas Fairbanks Sr.

First Academy Awards: May 16, 1929, at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel. There were 250 in attendance and tickets were $10.

The accounting firm of Price Waterhouse first tabulated the votes in 1935 - and the firm has been on the job ever since.

First year the sealed-envelope system was used to announce winners: 1941.

First telecast of the awards: 1953.

First color telecast: 1966.

First Best Picture winner: ``Wings'' (1927-28).

First Best Actor winner: Emil Jannings, ``The Last Command'' and ``The Way of All Flesh'' (1927-28).

First Best Actress winner: Janet Gaynor, ``Seventh Heaven,'' ``Sunrise'' and ``Street Angel'' (1927-28).

First African-American performer to win an Oscar: Hattie McDaniel, Best Supporting Actress for ``Gone With the Wind'' (1939).

Academy Awards postponed: 1938 - one week (reason: floods); 1968 - two days (reason: funeral of Martin Luther King Jr.); 1981 - one day (reason: assassination attempt on President Ronald Reagan).

Youngest performer to win a competitive Oscar: Tatum O'Neal, age 10 - Best Supporting Actress for ``Paper Moon'' (1973).

There have been two ties in Oscar history: In 1931-32, Frederic March (``Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde'') and Wallace Beery (``The Champ'') both won Best Actor. In 1968, Barbra Streisand (``Funny Girl'') and Katharine Hepburn (``The Lion in Winter'') both won Best Actress.

Most acting nominations: Katharine Hepburn, 12.

Most acting wins: Katharine Hepburn, four.

Number of times Katharine Hepburn has attended the Oscars: one.

Henry Fonda, 76, and Katharine Hepburn, 74, became the oldest Best Actor and Actress winners for 1982's ``On Golden Pond.'' Hepburn's record was broken in 1989 by 80-year-old Jessica Tandy (``Driving Miss Daisy'').

Two actors have turned down their Oscars: George C. Scott, Best Actor winner of 1970 for ``Patton,'' and Marlon Brando, Best Actor winner of 1972 for ``The Godfather.''

All-time Oscar-winning champion: Walt Disney with 32, 12 of which were for cartoons.

To celebrate the achievement of ``Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs,'' the Academy awarded Walt Disney one normal-size Oscar and seven tiny ones.

Ventriloquist Edgar Bergen received a special Oscar in 1937 - made of wood.

Beginning in 1942, and for the duration of World War II, the Oscar statuette was made of plaster.

The statuette was given its nickname by academy librarian Margaret Herrick, who took one look at it and said, ``It looks like my Uncle Oscar!''

The only person to win an Oscar for playing an Oscar loser: Maggie Smith, Best Supporting Actress for ``California Suite'' (1978).

The Original Screenplay award for 1956 went to ``The Red Balloon.'' The film has no dialogue.

James Dean is the only actor to receive two posthumous Best Actor nominations: for ``East of Eden'' (1955) and ``Giant'' (1956).

Peter Finch is the only actor to win a Best Actor award posthumously: for ``Network'' (1976).

First time two actors have been nominated for playing the same role in the same film: 1997. Gloria Stuart (Best Supporting Actress) and Kate Winslet (Best Actress) were both nominated for their portrayals of ``Titanic'' heroine Rose.

The only actor nominated for Best Actor and Best Supporting Actor for the same role in one film: Barry Fitzgerald in 1944's ``Going My Way.''

For the Academy Awards of 1928-29, no film won more than one award, including Best Picture winner ``Broadway Melody'' - the only time that has happened.

The first Time ``Men in Black'' received an Oscar nomination prior to this year: 1934. The Three Stooges' ``Men in Black'' was nominated in the Best Comedy Short Subject category. It lost.

When Greer Garson won the Best Actress Oscar in 1942 for ``Mrs. Miniver,'' she delivered a legendarily long acceptance speech, lasting more than five minutes. It began: ``I am practically unprepared.''

First year Supporting Actor/Actress winners are given a statuette instead of just a plaque: 1943.

Longest wait before finally winning: Composer Victor Young won for Best Score of a Dramatic or Comedy film in 1956 for ``Around the World in 80 Days'' after 22 previous nominations. Unfortunately, he was not on hand to receive the award. He was dead.

In 1956, an anti-Communist clause was added to the academy's rules, forbidding nominations for any active Communist Party member or anyone who refused to testify before or respond to a congressional committee. The clause was dropped in 1959.

In 1960, Billy Wilder, as producer, director and writer of ``The Apartment'' won all three Oscars he was nominated for, including Best Picture. The feat was equaled by Francis Ford Coppola in 1974 for ``The Godfather Part II.''

Dianne Wiest is the only two-time Oscar-winning actor to deliver both winning performances for the same director: ``Hannah and Her Sisters'' (1986) and ``Bullets Over Broadway'' (1994), both for Woody Allen.

``Midnight Cowboy'' (1969) was the first X-rated film to be named Best Picture.

Both Richard Burton and Peter O'Toole received seven acting nominations with no wins.

Most Oscar wins by a single film: 11 (out of 12 nominations), ``Ben-Hur'' (1959). Screenwriter Karl Tunberg lost the Oscar to ``Room at the Top'' scripter Neil Paterson.

``West Side Story'' (1961) won 10 Oscars out of 11 nominations. Again, the screenwriter, Ernest Lehman, was the sole loser.

Both ``Gigi'' (1958) and ``The Last Emperor'' (1987) made clean sweeps. Each had nine nominations and nine wins.

Warner Bros.' part-talkie ``The Jazz Singer'' (1927) was not nominated in the first race for Best Picture, because the academy felt that silent films couldn't fairly compete with this landmark achievement. It received a special award for ``revolutionizing the industry.''

Hollywood legends who have never won an Oscar in competition: Alfred Hitchcock, Charlie Chaplin, Greta Garbo, Cary Grant, Fred Astaire, Maurice Chevalier, Barbara Stanwyck, Robert Mitchum, Errol Flynn, Edward G. Robinson, the Marx Brothers, Buster Keaton, Lillian Gish, Rosalind Russell, Marlene Dietrich, Montgomery Clift, Steve McQueen, James Mason, Merle Oberon, Peter Sellers, Claude Raines, Sydney Greenstreet, John Barrymore, Tallulah Bankhead, Lon Chaney, Betty Grable, Jean Harlow, Rita Hayworth, Al Jolson, Peter Lorre, Marilyn Monroe and Ronald Reagan.

``Citizen Kane'' lost out for Best Picture in 1941 to ``How Green Was My Valley.''

In 1933, Will Rogers announced the Best Director winner as ``my good friend Frank,'' leading Frank Capra (nominated for ``Lady for a Day'') to mistakenly walk to the podium for what was another Frank's prize (Frank Lloyd for ``Cavalcade'').

The telecast of 1959 featured host Jerry Lewis and more than 90 Hollywood stars floundering to fill in 20 minutes of dead air time when the ceremony wrapped too early. Befuddled stars coupled off for impromptu ballroom dancing, while Lewis struggled with an ad-libbed routine.

The top gaffe in 1969 went to Barbra Streisand for ripping her transparent pants on the way to the podium.

In 1974, producer Bert Schneider, who won the award for Best Documentary for his controversial anti-war film, ``Hearts and Minds,'' read a congratulatory telegram from the Viet Cong government. Offended emcee Bob Hope was busy backstage, engineering an impromptu academy disclaimer that was then read by Frank Sinatra.

In 1984, an aging Laurence Olivier failed to announce the Best Picture nominees in his haste to present the winner.

Host David Niven kept the 1974 show flowing when a streaker decided to bare his assets on live television. ``Isn't it fascinating,'' Niven ad-libbed, ``that the only laugh that man will ever get is by stripping off his shorts and showing his shortcomings.''
COPYRIGHT 1998 Daily News
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1998, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:L.A. LIFE
Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Date:Mar 22, 1998
Words:1299
Previous Article:BEST PICTURE NO SURE THING; DON'T EVEN TRY TO PREDICT HOW ACADEMY VOTE WILL GO.
Next Article:DONEN STEPS INTO SPOTLIGHT; INNOVATIVE DIRECTOR TO GET SPECIAL AWARD.


Related Articles
W.E.B. Du Bois: Biography of a Race, 1868-1919.
JOEL AND JOHN: PIANO MEN ROCK THE FORUM.
KIDS/SNEAK PEAK : PAT, PAT, PAT THE BUNNY, SING, SING, SING THE SONGS.
WHAT TIME IS IT? IT'S `HOWDY DOODY' TIME FOR AREA FIRM.
FILM/SNEAK PEEK : SHARING THE NOSTALGIA ON NOSTALGIC FILM.
BUFFALO BOB, CREATOR AND HOST OF TV'S HOWDY DOODY SHOW.
DODGERS IN THE RIGHT BUT LOSE : BRAVES' SMOLTZ HAS TOO MUCH FOR L.A. ATLANTA 3, DODGERS 1.
ALL DOLLED UP HINES & CO. BRING NEW SHINE TO AN OLD FAVORITE.
'STEEL MAGNOLIAS' SOFTENS FALCON.
PUBLIC FORUM.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2017 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters