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AMOCO, LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABS PROJECT TO IMPROVE CONVERSION OF HEAVY CRUDE TO GASOLINE

 AMOCO, LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABS PROJECT TO
 IMPROVE CONVERSION OF HEAVY CRUDE TO GASOLINE
 CHICAGO, Nov. 12 /PRNewswire/ -- Amoco Oil Company will tap the supercomputing power of Los Alamos National Laboratory to increase the production of gasoline and other high-grade products from heavy, high- sulfur crude oil.
 Los Alamos and Amoco recently signed a cooperative research and development agreement for a new computer program that will simulate chemical reactions in Amoco's Residual Oil Hydrocracking Unit (RHU) at the company's Texas City, Texas, refinery.
 Amoco uses the RHU to process heavy, high-sulfur crude oils into lighter materials which, in turn, can be converted to gasoline and distillates by standard refining processes.
 The program should give Amoco engineers deeper insight into physical and chemical processes in the reactor and enable them to predict the effects of proposed reactor design changes on the refining process.
 "We hope to use this new program in the same way the aircraft industry uses supercomputer simulations to evaluate design improvements for wings and fuselages," said Brian VanderHeyden, Amoco's principal investigator on the project.
 The code will generate still images and motion pictures from predictions of the flow, temperature and chemical distribution patterns that occur inside the reactor.
 The value of the three-year agreement is about $4 million, with costs shared equally by Amoco and the U.S. Department of Energy. Amoco signed a similar agreement with Sandia National Laboratories, which will collaborate with Los Alamos in writing the new code and adapting it to the latest supercomputers.
 Amoco plans to build a one-quarter-scale model of an RHU reactor at its Naperville, Ill., research and development facility. Company scientists will conduct experiments with the model and compare their observations to the results predicted by the new code.
 According to VanderHeyden and Bryan "Bucky" Kashiwa of Los Alamos' Fluid Dynamics Group, the new code can likely be adapted to build models of many other types of reactors used in other petroleum and chemical refining processes.
 "These multiphase flow codes are needed in the plastics industry, in the handling of mining ore and in large-scale materials processing, such as the manufacture of iron and steel," Kashiwa said.
 The cooperative effort combines Amoco's experience in experimental and design work for chemical processes with the computational expertise developed at the national laboratories in the multiphase flows that take place in nuclear reactions.
 Amoco Oil Company is the refining, marketing and transportation subsidiary of the Chicago-based Amoco Corporation (NYSE: AN).
 Los Alamos National Laboratory is a multi-disciplinary research organization that applies science and technology to problems of national security ranging from defense to energy research. It is operated by the University of California for the U.S. Department of Energy.
 -0- 11/12/92
 /CONTACT: Tom Mueller of Amoco Corporation, 312-856-5388, or Jim Daneskiold of Los Alamos National Laboratory, 505-667-7000/ CO: Amoco Corporation ST: Illinois IN: OIL SU:


KK -- CL007 -- 0153 11/12/92 11:55 EST
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Date:Nov 12, 1992
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