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AMIS, X.400 to lead way.

AMIS, X400 TO LEAD WAY

Networking will become an important factor in moving an increased messaging traffic around geographically dispersed organizations.

Voice-processing vendors are the natural candidates for providing the control mechanism to access, transform, and forward information types.

To achieve this, a robust networking application capable of handling text,image, and voice--such as the X.400-based Message Net we offer-- will be required.

Recently, the Audio Messaging Interchange specification (AMIS) committee developed a protocol to promote the digital exchange of voice messages between competitive voice-mail systemS.

X.400, already an accepted messaging standard for electronic mail, was selected as the protocol's delivery vechicle.

This protocol will enable a voice-processing computer to deliver a variety of messages regardless of info type.

The convergence of information types is taking place already.

In practical terms, that means adhering to the latest data and telecommunications standards--such as X.400--that will support integration of various media, even from different vendors.

This also means designing products with the flexibility to adapt to and support new technologies and standards as they are developed.

Universally accepted standards will allow users to employ the only true ubiquitous terminal--the telephone--to control information.

Users will store and forward messages of all types.

Imagine single "mailbox" from which a user could receive and access voice messages at home or at work.

Facsimile messages could be delivered on demand wherever a user happens to be.

Messages could include a combination of recorded voice and electronic mail (text) converted to synthesized voice.

Spreadsheets could be forwarded with attached voice comments to a co-worker.

In the '90s, our InfoMail will provide these services. Looking further down the road, one can imagine informatio-processing systems powerful enough to transform the medium--voice, facsimile, text, or imagine--for the user.

Different types of data will be transformed and will appear to the user as he or she defines them.

Users will be able to convert an electronic-mail message to voice so that it can be listened to if he or she is not at an electronic-mail terminal. Fax messages could be converted to text messages and then redirected as voice messages to someone's mailbox.

Speech-recognition advancements will allow users to deposit a voice message that will be converted automatically to a text memo.
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Title Annotation:Audio Messaging Interchange Specification
Author:Hawkins, Greg
Publication:Communications News
Date:Aug 1, 1990
Words:374
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