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AMERICANS VOTE "YES" FOR CANDY AT HALLOWEEN

 AMERICANS VOTE "YES" FOR CANDY AT HALLOWEEN
 RICHMOND, Va., Oct. 8 /PRNewswire/ -- Who's that knocking on your


door? If the tapping comes on Oct. 31, it could be a witch, a ghost or a goblin. Maybe it's a George Bush or Bill Clinton look-alike. Could it be Batman or Catwoman? All sorts of visitors are possible at your home on Halloween.
 On this festive occasion, these costumed characters hope to collect a bag full of treats. Their treat of choice is usually candy. According to the National Confectioners Association, nearly 90 percent of households with children will participate in Halloween by either letting their children go trick-or-treating or by buying candy to give away.
 "The tradition of giving candy at Halloween may be stronger than ever. People are realizing that candy can be an enjoyable part of a healthy, active lifestyle," comments Richard Gibian, Jr., vice president of operations at American Candy Company in Richmond, Va.
 A misconception about candy is that it is high in fat, calories, cholesterol and sodium. People who are savvy about nutrition now accept confectionery products as part of a healthy diet and fitness routine. "A half-ounce of jelly beans contains no cholesterol, very little fat and sodium and only about 50 calories," explains Gibian. "A lollipop that weighs 6/10 oz. has only 66 calories.
 American Candy Company's manufacturing facilities in Oklahoma City, Okla. and Selma, Ala. have produced almost 2.5 million pounds of candy for Halloween this year. Under a licensing agreement with The Walt Disney Company, American Candy Company produces Mickey Mix, an assortment of hard candies, and Mickey Mouse Pops. These lollipops in assorted fruit flavors are shaped like Mickey's head.
 Other products produced by the company that are popular at Halloween are packs of orange and black jelly beans, tubes of candy corn with horror heads of scary creatures, and Halloween pops. These orange-and- black lollipops feature witches, ghosts, jack-o-lanterns and other Halloween creatures on their foil wrappers.
 While Oct. 31 is a day for family fun and fancy frocks, American Candy Company strongly suggests that you examine all candy and other goodies before allowing your children to eat them. Throw away candy that is unwrapped or looks suspicious. Caution your children not to eat any treats you have not inspected. Then you and your children can enjoy a safe and happy Halloween.
 -0- 10/8/92
 /CONTACT: Sara Means Geigel, public relations manager of Pinkerton Group, 804-287-3369/ CO: American Candy Company ST: Virginia IN: FOD SU:


SM -- NYHFNS16 -- 7696 10/08/92 07:01 EDT
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Oct 8, 1992
Words:427
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