Printer Friendly

ALUMINUM USE IN AUTOMOBILES AVERAGES 191 POUNDS PER CAR

 ALUMINUM USE IN AUTOMOBILES AVERAGES 191 POUNDS PER CAR
 DETROIT, Oct. 27 /PRNewswire/ -- The average automobile produced in North America in 1991 contained 191 pounds of aluminum, according to an Aluminum Association study released today.
 The 191 pound number is 47 percent higher than the industry's estimated average of 130 pounds of aluminum per car in 1981. And it is over three times the 54 pounds in 1960, the first year records were kept.
 The study results were announced by David N. Parker, president, The Aluminum Association, and the association's Automotive and Truck Committee chairman, Marc Czachorski.
 Parker said that the growth in aluminum in cars is based on three factors: the metal's ability to lower car weight without reducing size, the fact that it enhances performance and aluminum's recyclability.
 Czachorski, marketing manager, Reynolds Metals Company, said that the industry expects even greater growth of aluminum in cars over the next decade.
 The study, conducted by Ducker Research, Inc., of Detroit, shows that Ford Motor Company leads the way in aluminum usage with an average of 219 pounds per car (ppc). General Motors cars manufactured in 1991 averaged 197 ppc and Chrysler models, 156 ppc, the Ducker study shows.
 The average aluminum per car produced in North America by transplant manufacturers, which included Honda, Hyundai, Mazda, Nissan, Subaru, Toyota, Volkswagen and Volvo, was 152 pounds.
 In all, just under 1.3 billion pounds of aluminum went into North American cars manufactured during 1991. That was 16 percent of the aluminum produced during 1991.
 Among individual cars, two General Motors models -- the Cadillac Allante (375 ppc) and Chevrolet Corvette (348 ppc) -- led the way on average aluminum usage.
 Ford's Lincoln Town Car was third with an average 334 ppc, according to the Ducker study. The Chrysler car with the highest aluminum average was the Eagle Talon with 198 ppc.
 Parker stated that the automotive market is the third largest for aluminum, behind packaging and construction.
 Currently, most aluminum usage centers in the engine and cylinder heads, intake manifolds, engine blocks, including General Motors' new Northstar V-8, various motor mounts, pistons, heat exchangers, air conditioners, transmission housings, wheels and in exterior trim and bumper systems.
 In addition, some aluminum is used for hoods, seats, load floors and suspension components. When aluminum components are used in place of steel, the weight reduction is often 50 to 60 percent, Czachorski said.
 Ducker Research is now completing a similar study on another application where aluminum is playing an increasingly important role: light trucks. It should be available early in December.
 The 80 members of The Aluminum Association, headquartered in Washington, are domestic producers of primary and secondary aluminum and semi-fabricated aluminum products. Member companies operate 300 plants in 40 states.
 -0- 10/27/92
 /CONtACT: Jane Petty of The Aluminum Association, 202-862-5163/ CO: The Aluminum Association ST: District of Columbia, Michigan IN: AUT SU:


TW -- DC010 -- 5364 10/27/92 11:45 EST
COPYRIGHT 1992 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Oct 27, 1992
Words:488
Previous Article:FONIC BOARD OF DIRECTORS HOLDS SPECIAL MEETING
Next Article:/C O R R E C T I O N II -- FUQUA INDUSTRIES/
Topics:


Related Articles
Market drives automotive castings to aluminum.
HAYES WHEELS REPORTS FIRST-QUARTER RESULTS WELL ABOVE LAST YEAR
Chrome wheels propel expansion.
HAYES WHEELS INTERNATIONAL REPORTS 32 PERCENT EARNINGS INCREASE
AUTO STUDY SHOWS RECORD ALUMINUM GROWTH
General Motors Signs Multibillion-Dollar Aluminum Deal.
Aluminum -- A Material Response to Climate Change.
Revved up. (Nonferrous).
Castings drive fuel efficiency: lightweight castings continue to play an important role in reducing weight and increasing fuel efficiency of vehicles.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters