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ALTEON COMPOUND FOUND TO INHIBIT EXPERIMENTAL DIABETIC RETINOPATHY

ALTEON COMPOUND FOUND TO INHIBIT EXPERIMENTAL DIABETIC RETINOPATHY
 NORTHVALE, N.J., Dec. 23 /PRNewswire/ -- It was reported in the current issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, that aminoguanidine, Alteon Inc.'s (NASDAQ: ALTN) primary compound, has been found to inhibit the development of diabetic retinopathy in laboratory animals.
 Diabetes is now the leading cause of new adult blindness in the United States. Pathologic retinal changes are found in virtually 100 percent of patients having type 1 (juvenile onset) diabetes and 70 percent of type 2 (adult onset) diabetes for 15 years or longer.
 The study, detailed in the Proceedings, Volume 88, Number 26, entitled, "Aminoguanidine Treatment Inhibits the Development of Experimental Diabetic Retinopathy," was authored by Hans-Peter Hammes, Sabine Martin, Konrad Federlin, Karl Geisen and Michael Brownlee. Laboratory rats were first injected with a diabetes-inducing compound. After 26 weeks, retinal capillaries of aminoguanidine-treated diabetic rats were almost completely free of any advanced glycosylation end- products (AGEs) compared with the retinal capillaries of untreated diabetic rats. After 75 weeks, retinal capillaries of aminoguanidine- treated diabetic rats were almost free of the characteristic pathologic features of retinopathy. In contrast, untreated diabetic animals had a 19-fold increase in capillary abnormalities. The results of the study suggest that aminoguanidine or aminoguanidine analogs may have therapeutic potential for the future prevention of human diabetic retinopathy.
 Commenting on the findings, John Harding, Ph.D., senior research scientist at the University of Oxford, England, said, "In my lab at Oxford we have conducted related experiments using aminoguanidine and have concluded that it inhibits the reaction of sugars with proteins. This inhibition is important in preventing complications of diabetes."
 Alteon Inc. is engaged in the discovery and development of products for the detection and treatment of the complications of diabetes and aging. These products are designed to monitor, inhibit, reverse and measure damage to cells, tissues and organs caused by advanced glycosylation end-products which are formed as a result of biologic sugars reacting with critical molecules in body tissues.
 -0- 12/23/91
 /CONTACT: Charles A. Faden, chairman, president & CEO of Alteon, 201-784-1010, or Anthony J. Russo of Noonan/Russo Communications, 212-979-9180, for Alteon/
 (ALTN) CO: Alteon, Inc. ST: New Jersey IN: MTC SU: FC-OS -- NY013 -- 4742 12/23/91 09:58 EST
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Copyright 1991 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

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Date:Dec 23, 1991
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