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ALARM AS DEADLY TB HITS TWO STUDENTS.

Byline: SAM GRIFFITH

STUDENTS were on alert last night after two tested positive for potentially-fatal TB at a college campus.

The cases were discovered at Dublin City University where 150 students and staff were being tested.

A DCU spokesman said the pair are receiving treatment for non-contagious forms of the disease.

But anyone who may have been in close contact with the affected scholars have been offered examinations.

Tuberculosis is a bacterial disease that causes an infection of the lungs.

It can also affect other parts including bones, kidneys and lymph nodes. Communications officer for Dublin North East HSE Frances Plunkett said the wider public's health was not at risk.

She said: "Screening of close contacts in the college is under way in accordance with the Guidelines for the Control and Prevention of Tuberculosis in Ireland 2010.

Appropriate information has been provided to all relevant contacts. There is no risk to thepublic."

DCU spokeswoman Eileen Colgan said the university was working with the HSE to ensure those who had been in contact with infected students were receiving tests for TB and the non-contagious form of the disease.

Both infectious and non-transferrable strands of TB can be caught.

Symptoms of infectious TB include fever, night sweats, weight loss and coughing blood.

CAPTION(S):

Infection... Tuberculosis
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Publication:Sunday Mirror (London, England)
Date:Mar 3, 2013
Words:214
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