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ADOPTING CALIFORNIA VEHICLE STANDARDS COULD COST NORTHEAST CONSUMERS 20-25 CENTS/GALLON AND 150,000 TO 300,000 JOBS: AMOCO EXECUTIVE

 ADOPTING CALIFORNIA VEHICLE STANDARDS COULD COST NORTHEAST CONSUMERS
 20-25 CENTS/GALLON AND 150,000 TO 300,000 JOBS: AMOCO EXECUTIVE
 /ADVANCE/RICHMOND, Va., Dec. 5 /PRNewswire/ -- Adoption of California Fuel and Vehicle Standards by northeastern states could cost consumers 20-25 cents a gallon and the region 150,000 to 300,000 jobs, an Amoco executive said here today.
 In contrast, the new Clean Air Act and other requirements already in place would accomplish 99 percent of vehicle hydrocarbon emission reductions, but at about half the cost.
 "The pollution problems in the northeast just aren't severe enough to warrant adoption of the California standards, especially in light of the enormous cost and minimal benefit they would bring," Jerrold L. Levine, Amoco Oil Company's director of corporate studies, told freshman legislators here at an energy briefing sponsored by the Virginia Petroleum Council.
 Levine said California violated ozone standards on nearly 300 days per year during 1987-89, compared with just 11 days per year in Virginia. Four of Virginia's 11 violations were recorded on top of White Top Mountain -- a rural, sparsely populated forest area where natural sources, such as trees, emit hydrocarbons which contribute to the ozone problem.
 "Controlling ozone is a real tough problem, but different regions need different solutions," said Levine. "The Clean Air Act and its amendments will generate 99 percent of the improvement: the California standards would make less than a 1 percent difference. So we would get very, very marginal incremental benefit from the California program here in the northeast, and at a tremendous cost."
 A recent study sponsored by the American Petroleum Institute estimated that 150,000-300,000 jobs could be lost in the northeast region if the California Vehicle and Fuel Standards were adopted here.
 Levine noted that the three main sources of hydrocarbon emissions are natural sources such as trees (60 percent), mobile sources such as automobiles (20 percent), and stationary sources such as factories (20 percent). The California standards address mobile sources, and at tremendous expense would reduce vehicle hydrocarbon emissions by only 1 percent over the next 20 years if adopted in the northeast region.
 By contrast, getting older cars off the roads would reduce emissions 46 percent and selling lower vapor pressure gasoline, which is already occurring in Virginia, reduces emissions 28 percent. In addition, the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments will reduce emissions another 12 percent, with new car evaporative systems and Stage II/Onboard Cannisters reducing emissions by 13 percent.
 -0- 12/5/91/1630
 /CONTACT: Ralph Stow, 312-856-5481, or Tom Mueller, 312-856-5388, both of Amoco/
 (AN) CO: Amoco Corporation ST: Illinois, Virginia IN: OIL SU:


JT -- NY052 -- 9680 12/05/91 12:38 EST
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Date:Dec 5, 1991
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