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ACOG, IBM Team Up to Launch 1996 Olympic Games Information on the World-Wide Web.

SAN JOSE, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--April 11, 1995--Starting today, millions of people around the world will be able to access official information about the 1996 Olympic Games by connecting with the 1996 Olympic Games' World-Wide Web (WWW) server on the Internet. Point the browser to http://www.atlanta.olympic.org.

Established by The Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games (ACOG) in conjunction with IBM, this new server will provide a wealth of continuously updated facts, figures, photos, illustrations, video and audio content -- all aimed at providing the latest news possible on the what, when and where of the sports, as well as how to buy tickets and be a part of the excitement.

The 1996 Olympic Games Server presents an array of information under nine major headings: Welcome; Sports & Venues; Official Programme; Travel Information; Tickets; Official Products; Sponsors; Cultural Olympiad; and What's New.

This is the first phase of information, which will be continuously updated and supplemented with more detail. The most extensive delivery of information will occur during the 1996 Games, with ACOG and IBM now developing plans for presentation of real-time results and other features.

Making the delivery of this information possible are powerful, high-performance, parallel computers from IBM. "The 1996 Olympic Games Server is a great example of how organizations and companies can benefit from the power of the Internet," said John Patrick, IBM vice president of Internet Applications, who delivered the keynote speech at Internet World today. "Information on the 1996 Olympic Games is in high demand around the world. By putting it on the Internet, the data will be available to more people than ever before, it will be available at any time, and it can be updated instantly. As we've learned from other customers, the Internet is an invaluable tool to make information easily accessible to a very wide audience."

Donna Jonsson, ACOG deputy managing director of communications, emphasized, "Interest about the 1996 Olympic Games is worldwide, and that interest is increasing rapidly as the summer of 1996 moves closer and closer. The Internet is an extremely effective means of responding to that interest and providing the most up-to-date information possible."

ACOG -- the first Olympic organizing committee to establish a WWW server -- began actively investigating the possibility of putting information on the Internet last year. "With more and more of the plans for the 1996 Olympic Games being finalized, we wanted to take full advantage of the latest in technology tools to ensure the widest distribution of Olympic information ever," said Bob Neal, ACOG's director of Information Systems Services. "With ACOG's presence on the WWW, we believe we're setting a precedent that other organizing committees will follow."

IBM -- as the Official Internet Information Systems Provider for ACOG -- is designing and formatting all ACOG data for the WWW. IBM is supplying all hardware, systems software, WWW applications, technical support, systems integration services, operations, facilities, document design, HTML implementation, security and access tracking for the 1996 Olympic Games Server.

IBM Internet security products allow retrieval of WWW information via the Internet, but prevent removal or manipulation of data.

IBM Scalable POWERparallel System(a) SP2 and RISC System/6000s(a) will be the web servers for the new Olympic information site. As the volume of information about the 1996 Olympic Games increases, the servers have the flexibility to scale up -- with additional processors and disk storage -- allowing more users to access the WWW site simultaneously.

SP2, the most powerful offering in IBM's RS/6000 product line, runs AIX(a) -- the company's open, industry-standard UNIX(b) operating system. This parallel supercomputer can assign different tasks to each node -- serving database information, video, or acting as a web server. Each of the nodes can work in parallel or independently -- whichever is faster -- on compute-or data-intensive jobs, responding to user requests. As information demands increase, mirror SP2 and RS/6000 systems will be added.

As the worldwide information technology sponsor, IBM is providing systems and people to help plan, manage and run the Olympic Games through the year 2000. -0-

(a) Indicates trademark or registered trademark of International Business Machines Corporation.

(b) UNIX is a registered trademark in the United States and other countries, licensed exclusively through X/Open Company Limited. IBM AIX Version 3.2.5 is branded X/Open UNIX 93.

CONTACT: Donna Jonsson Pam Evans Barbara Schneider

ACOG IBM GCI/Atlanta

404/224-1563 404/238-6165 404/873-5330
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Publication:Business Wire
Date:Apr 11, 1995
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