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ABSTRACTS.

Astuti, Rini and Andrew McGregor, 2017, Indigenous land claims or green grabs? Inclusions and exclusions within forest carbon politics in Indonesia. The Journal of Peasant Studies. 44:445-466.

In this paper we outline the new political conjuncture in forest governance emerging in Indonesia and trace how it is influencing the land claim strategies of an indigenous community in Central Kalimantan. The new political conjuncture is comprized on three interrelated elements: a Constitutional Court decision to recognize Indigenous land claims; the development of the Reducing Emissions from Forest Degradation and Deforestation Plus (REDD+) forest carbon program; and a national initiative known as One-map. Drawing on concepts of governmentality, assemblage and territoriality we trace how the Indigenous People's Alliance of the Archipelago (AMAN) are using this moment to assemble a land claim in Bahanei. We find that the conjuncture is providing opportunities for Indigenous communities to engage with a new assemblage of interests normally associated with green grabs to claim land back from state and private interests. However, the romantic green Indigenous subjectivities the new political conjuncture requires to attract carbon investment rarely fit the heterogeneous makeup of village life. This is leading to intimate exclusions based on ethnicity and class, raising troubling questions about the extent of overlap between land claims and green grabs.

Behler, Natascha, Lisa Kopsieker, Agata Staniewicz, Suimah Darmansyah, Robert Stuebing, & Thomas Ziegler, 2018, Population size, demography and diet of the Siamese crocodile, Crocodylus siamensis (Schneider, 1801) in the Mesangat Swamp in Kalimantan, Indonesia. Raffles Bulletin of Zoology 66: 506-516. http://zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:149E1B99-D3D5-41B2-ABF9-68CC4C10D239.

A study of the distribution, abundance and diet of the critically endangered Siamese crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis) was undertaken during 2010 and 2011 in the Mesangat wetland, East Kalimantan, Indonesia. It provides the first hard data concerning the ecology of the species outside of mainland Indochina. Crocodiles were captured if possible, weighed, measured and tagged subcutaneously with a Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT tag). Forty-three (43) non-hatchling C. siamensis were identified, of which seven were adults. An estimate of total non-hatchling population size was calculated from individuals marked in 2010 and recaptured in 2011, extrapolated to the area of all locations where C. siamensis were seen. The total population size in the survey area was estimated to be approximately 75 individuals. Ninety-one percent (91%) of all C. siamensis detections (n=77) occurred outside the forest-type habitat, adjacent to or within two meters of floating grassy mats. The first investigation on stomach contents of the species was undertaken in this study. Diet samples from 13 C. siamensis were obtained from stomach lavage and analyzed individually. Prey found in stomach contents contained insect remnants, snail shells, fish bones, bird feathers, snake scales and small mammal fur and varied considerably between individuals. The presence of necrophagic ants suggested that C. siamensis consume carrion. The current study confirmed at least one healthy breeding population of C. siamensis outside of the mainland of Indochina and provides important data for the species' long-term conservation in Kalimantan.

Cullip, Peter F., 2017, Remun language use and maintenance. Journal of Modern Languages, 15(1):59-70.

The Remun Iban community of Sarawak speak a dialect of Iban which is said to be unintelligible to other Ibans. Generally, they possess a strong identity as Remun and this code is the essence of their community identity vis-a-vis the Iban and neighboring ethnic groups. For many Remun villages. This situation is changing. As a relatively small and linguistically isolated group, the multilingual Remun are facing strong macro-pressure which could be expected to lead to language shift to Iban. This is indeed happening in peripheral villages. This paper reports on the linguistic situation in the original, core Remun settlement of Kampung Remun and concludes that micro-level factors are operating to maintain the use and inter-generational transmission of Remun in this village.

Gasiorek, Piotr, 2018, New Bryodelphax species(Heterotardigrada: Echiniscidae) from Western Borneo (Sarawak), with new molecular data for the genus. Raffles Bulletin of Zoology 66: 371-381. http://zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:8AB35D34-1CEF-48B5-AB08-9EB25803C575.

Bornean fauna belongs to the most speciose on the world, however many animal groups remain largely or completely unstudied in this region. Microscopic water bears (Tardigrada) are a good example of such group. Members of the genus Bryodelphax Thulin, 1928 are the smallest land heterotardigrades. The new species found in a moss sample, Bryodelphax arenosus sp. nov., is among the tiniest representatives of this genus, with mature females not exceeding 100 [micro]m in body length. It differs from other congeners by having contrasting ornamentation of some elements of the dorsal armature formed by densely arranged intra-cuticular pillars, deep faceting of the scapular plate, and minute claws. Additional 18S and 28S rRNA sequences for the new taxon and recently described B. instabilis Gasiorek & Degma, 2018 unequivocally support earlier heterotardigrade phylogeny reconstructions, with Bryodelphax being not included in the Echiniscus-Iine [((Echiniscus + Diploechiniscus), Testechiniscus), Hypechiniscus]. The phyletic position of Bryodelphax is discussed in the light of present data.

Goh, W.L., W.S. Siew, S.E.W. Davies, S. Ball, G. Khoo, C.K. Lim, M. A. Rahman, Earl of Cranbrook, 2018, Genetic diversity among white-nest swiftlets of the genus Aerodramus (Aves: Apodidae: Collocaliini) of house-farms in Malaysia. Raffles Bulletin of Zoology 66: 350-360. http://zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:07C8CB8F-064A-4D03-BCEC-8211B135F461

The swiftlets (Aves, Apodidae, Collocaliini) have been known as producers of edible nests for four centuries. Among the genus Aerodramus Oberholser 1912 ecological evidence and museum specimens support the existence of two wild species making 'white' edible nests: grey-rumped swiftlet Aerodramus inexpectatus (Hume, 1873), a species occurring on islands, rocky stacks and maritime cliffs from the Andaman Islands to the north-east coast of Borneo, and brown-rumped swiftlet A. fuciphagus (Thunberg, 1812), occurring at inland sites only in Borneo, but at inland and island localities in Sumatra, Java, and Nusa Tenggara Barat, Indonesia. Housefarm swiftlets, which make similar white nests, were first recorded as spontaneous occupiers of buildings in Java, Indonesia, in the late 19th century, presumably from A. fuciphagus stock. In Peninsular Malaysia and Singapore, the first observations of nesting in buildings were made later, from 1931 to 1947. Subsequent human intervention has greatly expanded the numbers and range of house-farms, first in Java and elsewhere in Indonesia by fostering eggs in the nests of Linchi Swiftlets Collocalia linchi, and latterly by the use of recorded vocalizations to attract birds into purpose-made buildings. During the 20th and early 21st centuries, house-farm swiftlets and "house-farming" have largely replaced wild colonies as sources of white nests. Previous genetic evidence based on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has supported species level separation of the two wild white-nest species but more recent genetic studies have questioned this conclusion. The present study has focused on mitochondrial genetics with new samples of swiftlets from house-farms in Peninsular and Bornean Malaysia, and wild grey-rumped swiftlets Aerodramus inexpectatus on the islands of Mantanani Besar, Sabah, and Seringgis, Terengganu. GenBank data were used to extend comparisons to include house-farm swiftlet mtDNA from southern Thailand and Vietnam. Re-analysis of the three previous studies of genetic diversity in house-farm swiftlets coupled with the new supplementary data of mitochondrial cytochrome-b shows that the multiple maternal lineages observed within the house-farm swiftlets of Malaysia can also be detected more widely across the Southeast Asian region. In conclusion, we argue that housefarm swiftlets exhibit behavioral characters that could be considered evidence of domestication. We hope to see further studies using fuller genome sequencing to give improved insights into the phylogenetics of the progressive domestication of house-farm white-nest swiftlets.

Hasudungan, Albert, 2018, Political Ecology of Palm Oil Development in the Kapuas Hulu District of West Kalimantan. Ph.D. thesis, University of Sydney, Faculty of Science, School of Geosciences.

This thesis examines how the enrolment of local communities into the palm oil economy is constructing a particular, and complicated, mode of agricultural transformation. I look at the ways that local livelihoods are negotiated in response to diverse palm oil development pathways across three villages in the Kapuas Hulu district of West Kalimantan, Indonesia. The thesis uses a political ecology approach to examine the ways agrarian communities adapt their local economic production and social relations in response to the forthright assertion of a capitalist economy upon their local landscape. I do this by examining: i) the multi-scalar institutional arrangements that shape agrarian change; ii) the processes through which land is made available for large-scale oil palm cultivation; and iii) the implications for local livelihoods and agrarian transformation. I apply ethnographic field work across three villages, with primary data collected through participant observation, semi-structured interviews, group discussion, and household economic survey. I argue that the broader institutional settings of the global value chain for palm oil provide a fundamental framework that limits and shapes possible livelihood pathways for rural communities in Kapuas Hulu. Buyer-driven governance structures also reach into Kapuas Hulu to provide market access opportunities and infrastructure development. I present a critical analysis of the political economy of palm oil that results in land dispossession and social differentiation in Kalimantan, but with a key contribution being the role played by customary Dayak elites in this process. However, I also find that the subjective well-being of many community members to have improved along with the expansion of oil palm, with many households generally appreciative of opportunities to participate and engage in smallholder oil palm production. Importantly, however, this only holds true when the nature of the engagement is on their own terms.

Ilardo, Melissa A., Ida Moltke, Thorfinn S. Korneliussen, JadeCheng, et al., 2018, Physiological and Genetic Adaptations to Diving in Sea Nomads. Cell 173(3): 569-580.e15.

Understanding the physiology and genetics of human hypoxia tolerance has important medical implications, but this phenomenon has thus far only been investigated in high-altitude human populations. Another system, yet to be explored, is humans who engage in breath-hold diving. The indigenous Bajau people ("Sea Nomads") of Southeast Asia live a subsistence lifestyle based on breath-hold diving and are renowned for their extraordinary breath-holding abilities. However, it is unknown whether this has a genetic basis. Using a comparative genomic study, we show that natural selection on genetic variants in the PDE10A gene have increased spleen size in the Bajau, providing them with a larger reservoir of oxygenated red blood cells. We also find evidence of strong selection specific to the Bajau on BDKRB2. a gene affecting the human diving reflex. Thus, the Bajau, and possibly other diving populations, provide a new opportunity to study human adaptation to hypoxia tolerance.

Koh, Keng We, 2017, Familiar strangers and stranger-kings: Mobility, diasporas, and the foreign in the eighteenth-century Malay world. Journal of Southeast Asian Studies, 48(3):390-413.

Early modern Malay historiography has been dominated by the history of European trading, colonial empires and local port-polities, often framed along indigenous-versus-foreign lines. Yet, mobility has long been a central feature of this region shaped by commerce, as evidenced by the historical phenomenon of the "stranger-king." This study examines the cultural, political and economic impacts of intra-regional migration and diasporic communities in this region, specifically comparing the interconnected histories of the Chinese, Bugis. Arab, and Minangkabau communities in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Locating this history within that of maritime Asia, this study provides a nuanced understanding of the historical Malay world beyond essentialism and communalism. This article highlights why scholars of the Malay world should take into account the important roles of mobility and "strangers." It concludes that the Malay world was not a timeless or natural construct, but one whose contours and identity were continually shaped by significant diasporic communities and historical encounters.

Mohd-Azlan, Jayasilan, Hidayah Nurul-Asna,Thaqifah Syaza Jailan, Andrew Alek Tuen, Lading Engkamat, Dayang Nuriza Abdillah, Ramlah Zainudin & Jedediah F. Brodie, 2018, Camera trapping of terrestrial animals in Tanjung Datu National Park, Sarawak, Borneo. Raffles Bulletin of Zoology 66: 587-594. http://zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:Pub:ED367842-7592-4305-AE18-32BBDCA4ECCC

Information on distribution is useful for determining global conservation status of species and for prescribing sound management practices for taxa of conservation importance. Therefore, an attempt to understand the distribution of terrestrial animals using infra-red camera traps in Tanjung Datu National Park, Borneo, was carried out from July 2013 to October 2015 (28 months). A total of 23 camera locations set in various microhabitats and elevations accumulated 2,490 camera days, which resulted in 1,189 independent animal images comprised of 21 mammals, two birds, and one reptile species. The cameras revealed a total of 20 medium to large mammals (excluding treeshrews & small rodents), with the most common species photographed being the pig-tailed macaque (independent images n = 278) and bearded pig (271), while the masked palm civet (1) and Sunda pangolin (1) were only represented by singletons. Most of the common species are listed as Protected (33.64%) in the Sarawak Wild Life Protection Ordinance 1998, while 2.02% species have Totally Protected status. Less than 1% of the species are considered Critically Endangered and Endangered, 3.57% are considered Near Threatened, and 74.3% are considered Vulnerable under the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. In addition, this survey has provided detailed information on activity patterns of some cryptic species. The absence of larger carnivores suggests that species such as the Sunda clouded leopard and Bornean sun bear may have been extirpated from this small, isolated, and fragmented protected area. We emphasize that regular monitoring of wildlife in National Parks should not be neglected, especially when the surrounding area is experiencing accelerated and unprecedented rates of habitat conversion.

Pegan, Teresa M., Eric R. Gulson-Castillo, Alim Biun, Joseph I. Byington, Robert G. Moyle, Fred Tuh Yit Yu, Eric M. Wood, David W. Winkler, Frederick H. Sheldon, 2018, An assessment of avifauna in a recovering lowland forest at Kinabalu National Park, Malaysian Borneo. Raffles Bulletin of Zoology 66: 110-131. http://zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org: pub: FD788156-4.

Well-known for its high elevation areas, Kinabalu National Park in Sabah, Malaysia, also protects lowland areas that have received little ornithological attention. Here we describe the avian community at Serinsim Substation, an area of mixed lowland rainforest habitats within the park. We present observations from Serinsim, including an annotated list of the 202 species recorded, and measurements of mist-netted individuals. These observations derive from two expeditions: one in 2004 and one in 2014. Although parts of Serinsim's forests are recovering from forest fires and historic, low-intensity logging, they are a valuable habitat for many lowland rainforest bird species, including uncommon species such as chestnut-necklaced partridge, fulvous-chested jungle-flycatcher, and chestnut-capped thrush. The diversity of birds at Serinsim highlights the importance of preserving degraded tropical forest for conservation. Our observations serve as a valuable baseline assessment of the avifauna in this region, which is particularly important in this era of rapid environmental destruction and land-use change.

Polgar, G., T.U. Grafe, H.Y.K Pang, A. lira him. D. Cicuzza, and J.W.F. Slik, 2018, The Universiti Brunei Darussalam biological collections: history, present assets, and future development. Raffles Bulletin of Zoology 66:320-336. http://zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:EF.

The Universiti Brunei Darussalam Museum and Herbarium are two small zoological and botanical university collections that started in the 1980s, mainly as research facilities. They contain collections and type material from northern Borneo that are of historical and scientific interest, and have received the contributions of several internationally renowned researchers. We here provide a first account of the history, recent activities, current state, present assets, and possible future developments of these two natural history collections. A brief review of the Southeast Asian natural history museums and collections, including herbaria, highlights the scarcity and importance of natural repositories of biodiversity in this region, one of the world's richest biodiversity hotspots.

Rewcastle Brown, Clare, 2018, The Sarawak Report: The Inside Story of the IMDB Expose". (Foreword by Gordon Brown; Introduction by Baru Bian) London: Sarawak Report. ISBN139781527219366, [pounds sterling]14.99.

The Sarawak Report is the stranger-than-fiction tale of how one woman uncovered the world's biggest theft which, in 2018, brought down the Malaysian government.

Investigating the deforestation of Sarawak, Borneo, and the dispossession of its people, journalist Clare Rewcastle Brown followed a trail of corruption that led her to the heart of Malaysian politics and to Prime Minister Najib Razak himself. Determined that the public should know the truth, she started a blog, which became Malaysia's go-to news outlet for information that the government was trying to suppress--and whistleblowers wanted to get out. She was soon running a radio station too. To nail down absolute proof, Rewcastle Brown criss-crossed the globe and, defying danger, pieced together the evidence of the 1MDB scandal--the theft of billions from the country's sovereign wealth fund. Her reporting--exposing the shady dealings of international politicians, finance powerhouses, prominent PR firms, and Hollywood glitterati--convulsed Malaysian politics and reverberated around the world. The US government made its largest ever kleptocracy asset seizure, while banks and bankers fell.

Sweeping in scope, The Sarawak Report provides a jaw-dropping behind-the-scenes narrative of Malaysia's recent turbulent political struggles, revealing, as never before, how government-funded cyber-warfare and fake news operate, and, in an era of threadbare mainstream media, demonstrating that epoch-changing investigative journalism is still possible. It is an urgent account of the reality of globalization--and the astonishing story of how one person made a difference.

Rubis, June Mary, 2017, Ritual revitalisation as adaptation to environmental stress: skull-blessing in Bidayuh communities of Borneo, Third World Thematics: A TWQ Journal, 2(2-3): 356-375. DOI: 10.1080/23802014.2017.1402667

Ritual revival can be a powerful way to organize social response to environmental stress. This case study examined how Bidayuh communities in Borneo sought to revitalize a skull-blessing ritual (Gawea Nyobang) as an adaptive social response to environmental stress. A mixed-method approach of literature review, semi-structured interviews, participant observation and collaborative ethnography was applied to this study. Results suggest that the ritual revival addresses both environmental and social factors, and possibly relies on polycentric governance and multiple-leadership. Based on these findings, a framework for an emerging revitalization movement is developed, which is adaptive, pragmatic, and visionary.

Staniewicz, Agata, Natascha Behler, Soeimah Dharmasyah, & Gareth Jones, 2018, Niche partitioning between juvenile sympatric crocodilians in Mesangat Lake, East Kalimantan, Indonesia. Raffles Bulletin of Zoology 66: 528-537. http://zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:53236B97-7623-413C-B05E-E3327A353861.

Crocodilians are apex predators and sympatric species are likely to have different ecologies or morphologies in order to minimize competition between species, i.e., niche partitioning. Here, we examined the ecological niche factors that may affect competition between juvenile Siamese crocodiles (Crocodylus siamensis) and Tomistoma (Tomistoma schlegelii) in Mesangat Lake--the only documented area where the two species coexist. This location has also been subjected to recent disturbance from logging and oil palm development. We identified and compared preferred habitats and stomach contents of each species. Tomistoma schlegelii were found predominantly in flooded forests, while C. siamensis were mainly in open areas. However, overlap in prey choice between juvenile T. schlegelii and C. siamensis was significantly higher than expected by chance and invertebrates were the most frequent prey items in both species. High overlap in prey choice between the two species suggests that juvenile T. schlegelii and C. siamensis are generalist predators. Furthermore, the evidence of separation of habitat combined with overlap in prey choice indicates competition-driven niche partitioning between C. siamensis and T. schlegelii. This paper provides basis for coordinated conservation efforts for the two threatened species in this unique ecosystem.

Tangit, Trixie, 2018, Ethnic Labels and Identity among Kadazans in Sabah (Malaysian Borneo). Ph.D. dissertation. Canberra, Anthropology, The Australian National University.

This thesis explores what it means to be Kadazan today by studying the interplay between the Kadazans' ethnic fluidity and their formal ethnic labels. The Kadazans, who come from Sabah, Malaysia, on the northern end of Borneo, are typically classified as non-Muslim indigenes. They are among Sabah's most culturally mixed groups and their use of a plethora of ethnic labels testifies to this. Yet, the Kadazans' lack of a definitive label has been criticized as endangering identity (Reid, 1997). To understand how ethnic labels and identity work among Kadazans, I explore their relationships with Malay, Dusun and Chinese groups as well as with Kadazandusun, their current official ethnic group. The thesis shows that Kadazans have a range of possible forms of identification open to them. For some the label "Sino-Kadazan" is important in that it establishes a mixed Kadazan-Chinese identity that they find attractive. Others assert the importance of the "Kadazandusun" label, especially in the public/political sphere. Some prefer the 'Dusun' or even "Malay" labels. Following Chua (2007), I argue that Kadazans are constantly faced with the choice of fixing their identities in line with certain labels or criteria, or of keeping their identity fluid. I also show that these choices are always made in the context of the constraints imposed by both increasing Malayanization and the rigid ethnic identification rules of the Malaysian state. The case of the Kadazans illustrates clearly that a distinction always needs to be made between formal ethnic structures and the often more flexible forms of identification found on the ground.

White, Julia & Ben White, 2012, Gendered experiences of dispossession: oil palm expansion in a Dayak Hibun community in West Kalimantan. The Journal of Peasant Studies. 39(3-4):995-1016.

This article explores the gendered experience of monocrop oil-palm expansion in a Hibun Dayak community in Sanggau District, West Kalimantan (Indonesia). It shows how the expanding corporate plantation and contract farming system has undermined the position and livelihood of indigenous women in this already patriarchal community. The shifting of land tenure from the community to the state and the practice of the "family head" system of smallholder plot registration has eroded women's rights to land, and women are becoming a class of plantation labor. At the same time, as in other cases of expansion of agrarian corporate commodity production, we can discern a familiar pattern of ambivalence between, on the one hand, the attractions of regular cash income and, on the other, the loss of resource tenure and autonomy, which helps to explain the community's gendered experience of coercion, exploitation, intimidation, consent, and resistance.

Wilkinson, Clare L.. & Tan Heok Hui, 2018, Fishes of the Brantian drainage, Sabah, Malaysia, with description of a new Rasbora species (Teleostei: Cyprinidae). Raffles Bulletin of Zoology 66: 595-609. Online: http://zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:puh:1A11C44E-9585-4998-B839-2B7B74297883.1

Fish surveys were conducted between 2011 and 2017 in the Brantian drainage, Sabah, Malaysia. The fish fauna of the Brantian drainage includes a total of 34 species in 14 families, of which 23 species are reported from this drainage for the first time. All recorded species except one (Oreochromis mossambicus) are native, and 25 species are endemic to Borneo. Rasbora pycnopeza, new species, is described herein, based on specimens from the Brantian drainage. Specimens of the new species were earlier identified as R. sumatrana, from which it is distinguished by a combination of characters, including: geographic distribution, slender body and distinctive caudal-fin color pattern consisting of a thick distal black margin (covering 1/3 to 1/2 of upper and lower caudal fin lobes); a thin black lateral stripe and a black supraanal stripe.

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