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A-NEW SURFACE FOR SANDEFJORD: TOM ALLETT SPOKE TO RONNY STENSRUD FROM SAXDEFJORD AIRPORT ABOUT ITS RECENT RUNWAY REHABILITATION PROJECT.

Torp Sandefjord Airport (IATA:TRF) is located approximately 4.5 miles (7km) northeast of the Norwegian city of Sandefjord, and about 68 miles (110km) south of Oslo. It provides an entry point to eastern Norway and is marketed by some low-cost carriers as an alternative route to the Norwegian capital. Its single 9,806ft (2,989m) runway (18/36) recently needed to be refurbished and its management company, Sandefjord Lufthavn, decided to do the job at night.

The runway's previous refurbishment was undertaken in 1999. Over the years that followed, its general surface condition deteriorated through normal wear and tear. The airport's management team was concerned there was a risk that parts of the top surface might break up. Unchecked, it could lead to loose stones damaging aircraft, so the decision was taken to resurface.

Ronny Stensrud acted as the airport's project and operational building manager during the execution phase. He told Airports International the resurfacing and upgrading work has been a large and expensive task, describing it as a "special project for Torp".The initial study and analysis period lasted for a year and was followed by 17 months of design and planning. This was followed by a three-month procurement phase to choose the contractors and, one month after the contracts were issued, the ten-month physical building task began. Mr Stensrud noted:

"One 'special' element of the task was the implementation model. All the physical work was carried out at night, outside the airport's opening hours, between 23:30 and 05:30, when the runway reopened for a normal working day throughout the whole project period.

This gave us many challenges and therefore required particularly good planning.

Needing the runway to be open at 05:30 meant that the runway pavement had to comply with the regulations for 'local' slopes and uneven surfaces. There must be no 'deep ditches' along the runway and, obviously, all machines and equipment had to be moved away from the safety area, leaving the runway surface free of foreign object debris (FOD)."

A significant part of its technical infrastructure, such as the lighting system, was considered to have reached the end of its working life, and the angle of the runway's transverse / cross fall (camber) had to be corrected.

The project team comprised 130 staff, of which some 90 to 100 took part in the night-time building work.

Approximately 242, 188sq ft (22,500[m.sup.2]) of the existing concrete at each end of the runway was crushed using an Impactor 3000 vehicle before being reused as filler material.

Then, new asphalt was laid along its entire length. Two 24.5ft (7.5m)-wide shoulders were added along each side of the whole runway while a new stormwater drainage system was built requiring 22,966ft (7,000m) of water pipes, and a Code D turning pad was added at the southern /'36' end. At the same time a CAT II instrument landing system (ILS) was installed on runway 18.

The associated runway lighting and power supply infrastructure was replaced. This included swapping traditional halogen luminaires for 900 new LED lighting fixtures and building a power station to feed them. Approximately 82,000ft (25,000m) of electrical piping was laid down to accommodate 459,317ft (140,000m) of cabling. In all, almost 1.9 million sq ft (176, 000[m.sup.2]) of asphalt, weighing around 83,657 tons (85,000 tonnes) was used during the runway project.

Overall, the cost was approximately NOK 300 million (US35.2m) but, in addition to restoring the quality of the runway's top surface, the project simultaneously enhanced Torp's operational reliability as the CAT II ILS has reduced the number of delays and diversions too.

There was also a boost for its environmental credentials.

Mr Stensrud noted: "The new stormwater channels have meant that we use fewer chemicals during the winter operation.

Before, the liquids simply drained into the local watercourses but now all liquids are 'cleaned' as they pass through this 'green area'.

The transition to LED lighting has also reduced our electricity consumption. This has reduced our operating costs because we use fewer chemicals and consume less energy." He said the airport expects to spend significantly less money maintaining the newly paved surfaces.

Summarising the key success factors behind the project Mr Stensrud paid tribute to the "highly skilled contractors who were very willing to work every night for the duration of the project. "He also thanked the airport's neighbours whose: "great patience and understanding meant the night work never had to stop despite the significant noise generated by the vehicles and equipment." And it was with particular pride that he was able to say: "The team performed 80,000 hours of work over 200 nights without suffering any injuries and the runway reopened on time every morning without causing any delays."
TORP RUNWAY REFURBISHMENT COMPANIES

Construction and design management:       Ramboll Norge
Consulting Engineer:                      Norconsult
Consulting Engineer/Electrical:           Multiconsult
General Contractor/Construction:          Marthinsen & Duvholt
Subcontractor Asphalt:                    Lemminkainen
Electrical Contractor:                    Staurbakk
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Title Annotation:SCANDINAVIA TORP
Author:Allett, Tom
Publication:Airports International
Date:Jul 1, 2019
Words:834
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