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A shot of lime for cleaner burning.

Limestone injected into a coal-burning furnace acts like a chemical "sponge" that absorbs sulfur impurities before they escape into the atmosphere. Normally, this method requires large quantities of limestone. However, recent U.S. Department of eneryg tests show that if a special form of limestone is used, only one-third as much limestone is needed to reduce sulfur emissions.

This material, called "pressure-hydrated" lime, is made by mixing water and calcium, then compressing and heating the mixture. The resulting particles are very small and together have an extremely large surface area, making them more effective in capturing pollutants like sulfur dioxide. The powder is simply shot into a furnace through pipes that carry compressed air.
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Title Annotation:pressure-hydrated lime to reduce sulfur emissions
Publication:Science News
Date:Apr 6, 1985
Words:114
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