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A regular C.S. Lewis of birds.

A pert brown bird is tapping on our sliding door, trying to get in. A towhee, our neighbour says -- another has been trying to enter her house too. This has gone on all week. The rapping begins just at dawn and flutters far into dusk, and since this is solstice, and days are long, it sometimes wakes us up before we are ready. Poe had it easy: a one-night stand with a raven who nevermore chose to return. To look at our towhee, you wouldn't think it was that stupid. In fact this one strikes you as portly and intelligent a regular C.S. Lewis of birds. But the patio stutter does not flag: the towhee rattles along, mindless as a woodpecker. Sometimes I chase it off, or tie the dog up by the door, but it always comes back. If I had a gun, would I shoot it? Do I have the patience of the Dalai Lama? Our neighbour says they see their reflection in the window, are doing their best to meet themselves, a failed encounter of I and thou. I think it is envy: the towhees really do want in, they want to forsake the friendly s kies, give up on the fabled outdoor life. It's overrated, they have decided. The newspaper this morning says that fossils of feathered dinosaurs have just been discovered in China. Reptile gives way to bird, and now bird to housecat -- or even to human, homo domicilium. Evolution twitters on, seeing itself through a glass, darkly.
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Title Annotation:towhee spends days looking at reflection
Author:Willis, Paul
Publication:Presbyterian Record
Article Type:Brief Article
Date:Jun 1, 2001
Words:254
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