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A journey through the years.

June 1949 was the premier issue of Air Reserve Forces Review. Over the last 60 years, the magazine has seen many changes--names, development of color printing, office location moves, dozens of staff members coming and going. During that time, one thing has stayed the same: a committment to deliver the news that affects the members of the Air Force Reserve. And here, in the 492nd issue of Citizen Airman, we would like to share some of our history behind the development of the official magazine of the Air Force Reserve.

492 issues

1949

June 1949--First issue of Air Reserve Forces Review created out of Washington, D.C., with the "hearty approval and support "of Missouri Guardsman Harry S. Truman, who was pulling double duty as president of the United States at the time. This magazine kept not only Air Force Reservists informed, but also members of the Air National Guard, Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps, Civil Air Patrol and Air Scouts of America. Circulation for the magazine was around 480,000 copies per issue.

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One-color printing was the norm for many years, but the December 1951 issue featured a a second color for the first time. Everything was green print, including the pictures. In this issue, the staff also conducted a "Got a name?" contest, asking for readers' suggestions for a new title for the magazine.

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Introduced in July 1949, "Rudolph the Reservist" was the first cartoon series in the magazine.

"Deadly Dudley" was the next series cartoon featured in the magazine. "Dudley" often made bad decisions affecting his career. "Don't pull a Dudley" was the catch-phrase used to get the point across. His reign began in September 1952.

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The new name, The Air Reservist, was selected out of hundreds of suggestions and was featured for the first time in July 1952.

Milton Caniff's "Steve Canyon" made his first appearance in the magazine for its 10th anniversary in June 1959. This famous comic strip character would make several cameos through the years.

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In the October/ Novemeber 1958 issue, the magazine entered into the world of two-color printing on the covers. Spot color began appearing throughout the magazine after a few years, but this red & black issue started it off.

The "Rudolph" and "Dudley" cartoons were drawn by Air Force Reserve members and the sketches of the Outstanding Airmen column were no exception. This series of sketches began in March 1966 and was drawn by Lt. Col. McGowan Miller.

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In April 1961, The Air Reservist office was moved to Boiling Air Force Base, D.C. This office location would be the longest residence of the magazine--25 years and seven months.

In October 1971, the magazine's name was shortened to "AR."

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The jump to four-color printing throughout the entire magazine was made in the August-September 1967 issue.

This special issue of "everything a member wanted to know about the Air Force Reserve or Air National Guard" also exhibited the next magazine milestone--full color on the covers. This printing showed all the colors of the rainbow and every color in-between. This introduction was made June/July 1973.

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The ever-popular "Cartoons by Jake" began appearing in April 1973.

A few short years later, the last name change took place in the Winter 1985-1986 issue. Citizen Airman better reflected the make-up and the mission of the Air Reserve Forces.

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A redesign and reinstatement of the magazine's full name was the next big change. This came in April 1981.

Less than five years after the move to the Pentagon, the staff office moved to its current location at Robins AFB, Ga.

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As budget cuts made their way to the magazine, the audience became smaller and more concentrated. In November 1986 the Air National Guard audience was cut, leaving the magazine to the Air Force Reserve. This was also the first issue produced from Citizen Airman's new office at the Pentagon.

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The current cartoon series "Pope's Puns" began to appear in Citizen Airman in June 1992.

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The magazine was first produced in its current form with full color on every page in October 2005.

CURRENT CITIZEN AIRMAN STATS:

Magazine is produced bi-monthly: February, April, June, August, October and December.

Size ranges between 24-32 pages an issue.

Circulation runs about 72,000 copies in all 50 states and several countries around the world.

Managing Editor: Cliff Tyler joined the staff in August 1993.

Associate Editor: Bo Joyner joined the staff in August 1994.

Magazine Operations NCOIC: Staff Sgt. Celena Wilson joined the staff in August 2007.

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INFORMATION COMPILED BY STAFF SGT. CELENA WILSON
COPYRIGHT 2009 Air Force Reserves
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2009 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
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Author:Wilson, Celena
Publication:Citizen Airman
Date:Jun 1, 2009
Words:796
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