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A different shade of red? Tenants in our own country.

As the British Empire advanced, colour-me in countries turned red on the world map. Even with its faults, colonialism, bringing with it the best of the civilised values of "the mother country", challenged tribalism, barbarism, feudalism and incessant warfare--as here in New Zealand, with tribes locked into never-ending, destructive cycles of internecine butchery, and the horrors of cannibalism.

A pertinent observation, given the corruption and appalling treatment of Africans by fellow Africans of today, for example, has been that the only thing worse than colonialism is post-colonialism. Revisionist history now averts its eyes from colonisation's actual benefits to newly-discovered countries. However, inevitably, with new markets and opportunities available, not only the principled and fair-minded set sail on voyages of discovery. Rapacious traders, the ruthless and conscienceless, came too.

The starvation of the Irish in the great potato famine, the responsibility lying at the feet of Anglo-Irish landlords, the British government, and rapacious middlemen preying on Irish tenants in their own country, is among the most shocking examples of a comparatively recent abuse of power. In fact, it was largely because of this scandalous example that New Zealand was fortunate. When this country was taken under the protection of the Crown (reluctantly, but largely because of the pressure of Maori chiefs) the interests of the native population were to be paramount.

And so the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi, (in spite of today's highly imaginative "re-interpretations" by self-serving, part-Maori radicals, vote-buying MPs and lawyers who should know better) had one primary aim--to ensure that all New Zealanders, whether Maori or colonists, were now equal under the Crown, with their property rights safeguarded. Today's fanciful claims to the airwaves, lakes, rivers and coasts are not supported by the treaty.

Too easily forgotten is that those everywhere dedicating their lives to improve the living standards of all peoples under the British Crown established systems of justice, built schools, hospitals, railways, bridges, roads, introducing methods of farming and the discoveries and inventions of the industrial age. But because of the inevitable injustices found everywhere throughout history, references to colonialism have been used manipulatively -as Prime Minister John Key likes to do, to defend his high-handed decision to force a cash-strapped economy to pay up to (what will eventually be many times more than) a $26 million estimate to change the New Zealand fag--because he personally wants this.

Factor in the additional scores of millions of dollars which his compliant National government will support so that face-saving, costly PR will undoubtedly be poured into Key's campaign to manipulate an antagonistic public into backing his wish to dump our fag. The costs of changing all our passports--as well as every single additional printed record and visible depiction--raises the question of the abuse of power ... an example of top-down government where a determined individual imposes his/her own wishes on the country. New Zealanders' best protest, of course, will be to refuse fall into the trap of choosing an alternative fag--i.e. to refrain from voting in the first cunningly planned poll.

Why John Key's campaign? We have much to respect in our forebears, disparagingly lumped together as colonists. The British version of colonisation with, on the whole, a more civilised record than that of France and other countries, sought to do away with classes. It aimed to make available for all what Matthew Arnold described as the best that has been thought and known and said in the world... The greatest thinkers throughout history would agree with his definition of culture. Many of them have said something similar.

Who would argue that this should not be a priority in schools--offering to all children, no matter what their background, the opportunity to be extended intellectually and imaginatively--to become good and wise people, in order to live positive and productive lives? But the riches of an intellectual inheritance cannot be passed down to young New Zealanders if we repudiate the past, inevitably including the best of our writers, playwrights, novelists--teaching us about human nature--our historians, biographers, and great poets--opening new worlds of empathy, understanding, and appreciation of beauty.

With the well-planned attack of recent decades on colonialism--our British inheritance--New Zealanders have become predominantly poorly-educated, not through their own fault, but because of our Ministry of Education. Its personnel, some well-meaning, have long been manipulated into the determined agenda of neo-Marxists, aiming to white-ant all our cultural institutions. Its highly successful attempt to thoroughly dumb down our knowledge base has resulted in only a tiny minority of New Zealanders today having had (or having) anything like Arnold's definition of a genuine education. Funnelling part-Maori children, too, into schools with a damagingly narrow, te reo curriculum is more than challengeable.

The determined attack on the education system is part of that on all those institutions which once served the most vulnerable in our society ... alcoholics; those seeking to escape drug-taking; children and adolescents at risk from family and relations, the unborn child; abused women--with women's refuges' funding now under attack. The pattern of closure --Hamner's Queen Mary Hospital, utterly valuable in rehabilitating alcoholics and drug addicts; the better-run mental institutions --sanctuaries for many ejected into a non-exist, caring "community". And now the (officially denied) attempt to close down the important Salisbury School in Nelson--invoking the jargonised ephemera of a "wrap-around" system where nothing changes. At-risk girls are left with those who abuse them, while a magically transformed, genuinely efficient CYF "protects" them--from a distance --in a similar way to abused women protected by a court order only too easily ignored. For we have been undergoing a hostile form of neo-colonialism, the takeover of our country by cultural Marxists, operating within centres of power.

Similarly, the agenda of the European Commission have been implemented by the blunt tools of the restrictions on sovereignty in Britain itself, constrained by edicts from Brussels from properly guarding its borders and maintaining an independent judiciary. The UN's New World Order performs the same function, issuing compliance edicts, originating from its most tyrannical countries, to tighten its control on the West.

In New Zealand, the commercial colonisation of this country by Communist Chinese interests in particular is now well under way, backed by investment from, and in many cases directly controlled by, members of the CCP.

It is posing an extraordinarily dangerous threat. However, our maverick Prime Minister, in a close relationship with this totalitarian, repressive regime, determinedly looks away, even blatantly denying the existence of Auckland's housing crisis... Our land, farms, businesses, our strategic and scenic assets, our offshore islands--let alone our housing stock--are all being swallowed up, targeted by this damaging form of neo-colonialism basically assuming a gradual, but increasing over lordship over our territory.

Being culturally colonised by Marxism may be nothing to being dispossessed in our own country. Will this country once map-coloured as belonging to our home country, importantly symbolised by our New Zealand fag, eventually have the silver stars of the Southern Cross replaced by the gold stars on the red flag of Communist China?

By Amy Brooke

[c] Amy Brooke www.amybrooke.co.nz You can help us by sharing on Facebook! www.facebook.com/100daystodemocracy?ref=br_tf www.100days.co.nz www.summersounds.co.nz
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Title Annotation:CONSIDER THIS
Author:Brooke, Amy
Publication:Investigate HIS
Article Type:Essay
Date:Jun 1, 2015
Words:1199
Previous Article:Bravetown.
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