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A TASTE OF ANTIFREEZE CAN BE DEADLY TO PETS

 A TASTE OF ANTIFREEZE CAN BE DEADLY TO PETS
 DENVER, Nov. 3 /PRNewswire/ -- Pet owners wouldn't think of feeding


a spoonful of poison to their pets. However, whether antifreeze is in a puddle on the garage floor or in an open container, antifreeze can attract and kill household pets.
 Antifreeze poisoning in dogs and cats is common this time of year as people change the antifreeze in their cars' radiators. Animals often are drawn to the sweet-tasting liquid out of curiosity. Pets who live outdoors in subfreezing temperatures may find that the only water which is unfrozen is available in places where radiators were drained.
 The toxic agent in commercial antifreeze is ethylene glycol, a colorless, odorless liquid that makes up 95 percent of antifreeze solution. After ingestion, the poison is rapidly absorbed from the digestive tract and within 20 to 30 minutes vomiting, depression, lack of coordination and weakness often occur.
 The prognosis for animals poisoned with ethylene glycol depends on how much is ingested, the size of the animal and when treatment is started. Early diagnosis is imperative to treat the animal effectively. If not treated immediately, the animal may experience severe kidney damage, could lapse into a coma, and may die, all within 24 hours of ingestion.
 For the safety of your pets, the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) reminds you to dispose of antifreeze properly. Drain antifreeze into a container that can be closed and take it to a nearby service station for disposal. Thoroughly clean surfaces where the antifreeze was spilled. When storing antifreeze, make sure there are no leaks and the lid is on tight.
 Consult your veterinarian immediately if you notice your pet consuming highly toxic antifreeze or if your pet exhibits some of the early symptoms associated with the poisoning.
 The AAHA is an international organization of more than 10,000 veterinarians who treat companion animals such as dogs and cats. Established in 1933, the association is well-known for its quality standards for hospitals and pet health care.
 -0- 11/3/92
 /CONTACT: Marty Schechter of Kyla Thompson & Associates, 303-295-0555, for the AAHA/ CO: American Animal Hospital Association ST: Colorado IN: SU:


BB -- DVFNS2 -- 1907 11/03/92 07:31 EST
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Nov 3, 1992
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