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A RIDE THROUGH 8 DECADES OF EXCELLENCE.

1919: Svensk Filmindustri (SF) is born Dec. 27 out of the merger of AB Svenska Biografteatern and Filmindustri AB Skandia.

1921: Victor Sjostrom directs one of SF's most famous silent films, "Korkarlen."

1924: Greta Garbo wins her first starring role in SF's silent film version of Selma Lagerlof's "The Saga of Gosta Berling," directed by Mauritz Stiller.

1929: SF produces its first talking picture, "Sag det I toner," directed by Edvin Adolphson.

1935: Ingrid Bergman stars in her first SF film, "Munkbrogreven."

1940-50: Swedish moviegoing booms from 49 million admissions in 1940 to 65.5 million in 1950. Slapstick comedies are replaced by more serious fare.

1944: SF celebrates 25th anniversary with premieres of films including "Frenzy," directed by Alf Sjoberg and written by Ingmar Bergman.

1946: Ingmar Bergman makes his debut as a director at SF with the film "Crises."

1948: The SF film "Symphony of a City" receives the Oscar for best short subject (one-reel).

1957: Ingmar Bergman and SF receive the Jury Special Prize al Cannes for his film "The Seventh Seal."

1960: Directed by Ingmar Bergman, SF's "The Virgin Spring" receives the Oscar for foreign-language film.

1961: SF nabs another Oscar for foreign-lingo film for Ingmar Bergman's "Through a Glass Darkly."

1969: Bo Widerberg makes his first film for SF, "Adalen 31," and receives a Swedish Guldbagge (Gold Bug) for best director and also Grand Jury Prize at Cannes.

1973: SF is sold to the daily newspaper Dagens Nyheter by owner AB Hufvudstaden.

1982: The video distribution company Video Express/Media Transfer is launched. SF also introduces a unique profit-sharing system, Pay Per Transaction (PPT).

1983: SF is acquired by the Bonnier Group.

1984: Bonnier Group acquires Sweden's second-largest film company, Europafilm, and merges it with SF.

1985: The company moves its head office from Kungsgatan to Munchenbryggeriet at Soder Malarstrand in the southern part of Stockholm.

1988: Directed by Lasse Hallstrom, "My Life as a Dog" receives Oscar nominations for director and adapted screenplay.

1989: SF celebrates its 7Oth anniversary with the premiere of the film "1939." SF begins distribution in Norway through its acquisition of Mayco and establishes SF Norge.

1990: Opens eight-screen multiplex in Karlstad. Claes Eriksson's "The Gas Station" does boffo local B.O., with more than 800,000 admissions.

1991: Theatrical admissions begin to rise sharply in Sweden. Pay TV operation SF Succe is sold to Canal Plus. Lasse Aberg's "The Accidental Golfer" sells 1.5 million tix.

1992: Astrid Lindgren's "A Clever Little Girl Like Lotta" notches 500,000 admissions.

1993: Ake Sandstrom's "The Slingshot" scores 500,000 admissions. SF opens first multiplexes in Lund and Umea.

1994: SF celebrates 75th birthday and acquires Wegelius TV, begins construction of $10 million production studio. SF's first soap, "Three Crowns," is seen by 1.4 million TV viewers. Scandinavian Media Alliance for distribution between SF and Nordisk breaks up. Sandrews files antitrust complaint against SF.

1995: SF Studios opens in May at Kungens Kurva, south of Stockholm. SF's largest multiplex, Filmstaden Sergel, opens in Stockholm. SF launches a 16-screen upgrade in Gothenberg.

1996: SF moves into Norway and begins producing with Norwegian company Filmkameratene. SF CEO Lennart Wiklund moves to the Bonnier Group and Torsten Larsson moves from Bonnier to take over as CEO of SF.

1997: Reorganization of Bonnier Group begins. "Adam & Eva" scores at the box office with 700,000 admissions.

1998: Jan Edholm takes over as new CEO of SF and Jon Bernhardsson as new CEO of SF Bio. SF Bio becomes independent subsidiary of Bonnier. Raoul Lindqvist, VP of acquisitions and distribution, leaves and is replaced by SF Norge president Rasmus Ramstad. SF discontinues video distribution deal with Scanbox. SF Bio opens eight-plexes in Malmo.

1999: Jan Edholm leaves and Rasmus Ramstad moves up to becomes president and CEO. SF establishes Danish video operations. SF turns 80.
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Title Annotation:highlights from the 80-year history of Svensk Filmindustri AB
Publication:Variety
Article Type:Brief Article
Geographic Code:4EUSW
Date:May 17, 1999
Words:639
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