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A New Species of the Genus Tubulovesicula Yamaguti, 1934 (Digenea: Hemiuridae Looss, 1899) From the Fish Pomadasys olivaceum (Day) Off Karachi Coast.

Byline: Neelofer Shaukat and Fatima Mujib Bilqees

Abstract

A new species of the genus Tubulovesicula Yamaguti, 1934 is described here and named T. olivaceus from the stomach of the fish Pomadasys olivaceum (Pomadasyidae) off Karachi coast. The new species is separated from the previously described species as it has relatively small tail or ecsoma, ventral sucker at least 3 times larger than the oral sucker, testes close to ventral sucker, seminal vesicle pre-testicular, long, broader posteriorly reaching to posterior border of ventral sucker, pars prostatica small, hermaphroditic duct enclosed in a small, muscular pouch, genital opening at the base of pharynx immediately behind the intestinal bifurcate. Ovary is in the middle of soma, seven, coiled vitelline tubules situated almost in the middle of soma, uterus long, terminating far anterior to ecsoma. Eggs are numerous, small. Excretory pore is terminal. Excretory vesicle is tubular, arms uniting dorsal to pharynx.

Key words: Trematode, Tubulovesicula olivaceus digenetic trematode.

INTRODUCTION

Species reported from different parts of the world are T. lindbergi (Layman, 1930); Yamaguti, 1934; Siddiqi and Cable, 1960 from Leptocephalus conger, Synodus sp. and unidentified eel ; T. madurensis Nigrelli, 1940, syn. of T. lindbergi Manter, 1954 from Scorpaena madurensi; T. magnacetabulum Yamaguti, 1939 from Epinephelus akaara; T. marsupialia Oshmarin, 1965 from Saurida tumbil; T. muraenesocis Yamaguti, 1934 from Muraenesox cinereus, Trachinocephalus myops, Lophius litulon, Inimicus japonicus, Conger myriaster, Hamazima, Muraenesox coniceps; T. muraenesocis from Trachinocephalus; T. nanamoensis Mc Farlane, 1936; Manter, 1947 from Scorpaenichthys marmoratus; T. pinguis (Linton, 1940; Manter, 1947; syn Distomum grandiporum Rud. of Linton, 1898; D. rufoviride Rud. of Linton, 1898; D. tornatum Rud. of Linton, 1905 from Anguilla rostrata, Cynoscion regalis, Hemitripterus americanus, Merluccinus bilinearis, Menidia notata, Menticirrhus saxatilis, Opsanus tau, Paralichthys dentatus, Merlinus carolinus, Sphyraena borealis and Synodus foetens; T. californica Park, 1936 from Enophryns bison; T.diacopae Nagaty and Abdel-Aal, 1962 from Diacope sp.; T. hebrae Nagaty and Abdel-Aal, 1962 from Diacope sp.; T. pseudorhombi Yamaguti, 1938 from Pseudorhombus pentophthalmus and T. serrani Nagaty, 1956 from Serranus sp.

Members of the family Hemiuridae Looss, 1899 are among the most frequently encountered digeneans in deep sea benthic teleosts. A variety of genera including Tubulovesicula have been described from various parts of the world including Pakistan (Bilqees and Nighat, 1981; Bhutta and Khan, 1975; Linton, 1898, 1905, 1940; Nagaty, 1956; Nagaty and Abdel-Aal, 1962; Park, 1936; Siddiqi and Cable, 1960; (Nicoll, 1914) Yamaguti, 1934; Yamaguti, 1938; Yamaguti, 1939; Zaidi and Khan, 1977; T. microrchis Bilqees et al., 2010; T. macrovesicula Bilqees et al., 2010 and T. dorabi Bilqees et al., 2010). Seven species of the genus Tubulovesicula are known from fishes of Karachi coast. Present is an undescribed new species of the genus for which the name Tubulovesicula olivaceus is proposed referring to the host species.

The present new species T. olivaceus, therefore is distinctly different from the previously described species of the genus in having a combination of characters such as ventral sucker at least 3 times larger than the oral sucker, vitellaria situated more anteriorly with relatively small winding tubules, uterus does not reach in ecsoma and tail is relatively short.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

The fishes Pomadasys olivaceum were purchased from West Wharf, Fish Harbour, Karachi coast. Out of 15 fishes 2 were infected with 2 trematodes in each. Specimens were fixed in AFA solution, a mixture of 70% ethyl alcohol, formalin and acetic acid in the ratio of 90:7:3, under slight cover glass pressure for 24 hours, washed several times with 70% ethyl alcohol, stained with Mayer's Carmalum, dehydrated in graded series of alcohols, cleared in clove oil and xylene and mounted permanently in Canada balsam. Measurements are given length by width in millimeters. Drawings were made with the help of a camera lucida. Holotype and paratype specimens are in the collection of Department of Zoology, Jinnah University For Women, Karachi.

DESCRIPTION

Tubulovesicula olivaceus, new species

Family: Hemiuridae Looss, 1899

Sub-family: Diurinae Looss, 1907 (Syn. Stomachicolinae Yamaguti, 1958)

Genus: Tubulovesicula Yamaguti, 1934

Syn. Lecithurus Pilgulewsky, 1938

Species: Tubulovesicula olivaceus n.sp.

Host: Pomadasys olivaceum (Pomadasyidae)

Location: Stomach

Locality: Karachi coast, Pakistan

No. of specimens: 4 specimens from 2 hosts, 15 fishes examined.

Holotype: JUW - T15

Paratypes: JUW - T16

Body is long, tail is relatively small, rounded posteriorly, greatest width is at the region of ventral sucker. Lateral cuticular thickenings present near posterior end of soma, more prominent at the right side. Oral sucker is sub-terminal, pre-oral lobe present. Pre-pharynx is absent. Pharynx is small. Intestinal caeca are radiating directly from its base. Oesophagus is absent. Intestinal caeca long, reaching near about the posterior end of ecsoma. Ventral sucker is very large as compared to oral sucker, situated anteriorly in anterior quarter of the body. Testes are unequal, rounded, symmetrical, immediately behind ventral sucker, left testis smaller, close to ventral sucker. Seminal vesicle is pre-testicular, long, distinctly marked off posteriorly, becoming tubular anteriorly. Pars prostatica is small. Hermaphroditic duct is enclosed in muscular pouch. Genital opening is immediately behind intestinal bifurcation.

Ovary is almost rounded in the middle of soma. Vitelline tubules are coiled, 7, radiating posteriorly, far anterior to ecsoma then extending forward in the fore body joining the hermaphroditic duct. Uterus is not reaching the tail terminating far anterior to ecsoma. Eggs are numerous, small. Excretory pore is terminal. Excretory vesicle is tubular, arms uniting dorsally at the base of pharynx.

Measurement (mm)

Entire body size, 3.8 - 3.9 x 0.62 - 0.625; Soma length, 3.0 - 3.05; Soma width, 0.65 - 0.66; Ecsoma length, 0.89 - 0.90; Ecsoma width, 0.36 - 0.37; Fore body length, 0.49 - 0.50; Hind body length, 3.09 - 3.10; Oral sucker, 0.11 - 0.12 x 0.14 - 0.145; Pharynx, 0.05 - 0.055 x 0.043 - 0.044; Ventral sucker, 0.35 - 0.355 x 0.38 - 0.385; Sucker width ratio, 1: 0.03 - 0.031; Pars prostatica length, 0.19 - 0.20; Seminal vesicle length, 0.45 - 0.46; Anterior testis, 0.08 - 0.09 x 0.078 - 0.80; Posterior testis, 0.13 - 0.14 x 0.10 - 0.11; Posterior testis to ovary, 0.5 - 0.51; Ovary, 0.25 - 0.24 x 0.21 - 0.25; and Eggs, 0.022 - 0.04 x 0.017 - 0.02.

DISCUSSION

Species of the genus Tubulovesicula Yamaguti, 1934 reported previously from Karachi coast, Pakistan are T. spari Yamaguti, 1934; (Bilqees, 1981); Zaidi and Khan, 1977 from Muraenesox cinereus (Forsk); (Congridae); T. anguillae Yamaguti, 1934 (Zaidi and Khan, 1977) from Harpodon nehereus (Har) (Synodidae); T. magna Bilqees and Nighat, 1981 from Pomadasys olivaceum (Day) (Pomadasyidae), T. anguisticauda Nicoll, 1914; Yamaguti, 1934; (Bhutta and Khan, 1975); Bilqees, 1981 from Muraenesox cinereus (Forsk) (Muraenesocidae) and T. dorabi Bilqees et al., 2010 from Chirocentrus dorab.

Species of the genus Tubulovesicula reported from different parts of the world are T. lindbergi (Layman, 1930) Yamaguti, 1934; Siddiqi and Cable, 1960 from Leptocephalus conger, Synodus sp. and unidentified eel ; T. madurensis Nigrelli, 1940, syn. of T. lindbergi Manter, 1954 from Scorpaena madurensi; T. magnacetabulum Yamaguti, 1939 from Epinephelus akaara; T. marsupialia Oshmarin, 1965 from Saurida tumbil; T. muraenesocis Yamaguti, 1934 from Muraenesox cinereus, Trachinocephalus myops, Lophius litulon, Inimicus japonicus, Conger myriaster, Hamazima, Muraenesox coniceps; T. muraenesocis from Trachinocephalus; T. nanamoensis Mc Farlane, 1936; Manter, 1947 from Scorpaenichthys marmoratus; T. pinguis (Linton, 1940; Manter, 1947; syn Distomum grandiporum Rud. of Linton, 1898;

D. rufoviride Rud. of Linton, 1898; D. tornatum Rud. of Linton, 1905 from Anguilla rostrata, Cynoscion regalis, Hemitripterus americanus, Merluccinus bilinearis, Menidia notata, Menticirrhus saxatilis, Opsanus tau, Paralichthys dentatus, Merlinus carolinus, Sphyraena borealis and Synodus foetens; T. californica Park, 1936 from Enophryns bison; T. diacopae Nagaty and Abdel-Aal, 1962 from Diacope sp.; T. hebrae Nagaty and Abdel-Aal, 1962 from Diacope sp.; T. pseudorhombi Yamaguti, 1938 from Pseudorhombus pentophthalmus and T. serrani Nagaty, 1956 from Serranus sp.

In the present species T. olivaceus n.sp. pars prostatica is smaller than the seminal vesicle, ecsoma is much smaller than the soma and vitelline tubules are seven in number and uterus does not extend to ecsoma.

Manter has shown that number of vitelline tubules in a species of Tubulovesicula may be either 7 or 8 arranged in various positions. T. serrani is similar to T. anguillae Yamaguti, 1934 which has a very long pars prostatica; in T. anguillae it is much longer than the seminal vesicle; the uterus extends rather far into the ecsoma and eggs are 0.034 x 0.023 - 0.024. T. serrani differs from T. anguisticauda (Nicoll, 1914) in much longer ecsoma and more posterior extent of the pars prostatica.

Position of pars prostatica in T. pseudorhombi and T. anguisticauda is anterior to the ventral sucker, very similar to the present specimen; while in T. spari and T. anguillae the pars prostatica is well developed and extends from the middle of the acetabulum to near the internal bifurcation. In T. serrani the length of pars prostatica appears to be slightly less, than the length of seminal vesicle and hermaphroditic duct.

In T. pseudorhombi seminal vesicle is moderately long in close spirals on dorsal side of posterior half of acetabulum; while in T. spari seminal vesicle is broad at the base, runs sinuously on the postero-dorsal side of the ventral sucker. In T. anguillae the position of seminal vesicle is different. It is S-shaped lying in front of right testis. In T. magna and T. anguisticauda the seminal vesicle is tubular, more or less winding, pre-testicular in position. In T. serrani the seminal vesicle is sinuous, dorsal to posterior half of acetabulum and is slightly larger in length than the pars prostatica, while in the present specimen T. olivaceus n. sp. the seminal vesicle is long, pre-testicular, distinctly marked off posteriorly.

In T. serrani the ovary is ovoid, almost twice as large as one testis to right mid-line, posterior to right testis and overlapped dorsally by the right caecum. The position of ovary of T. pseudorhombi, T. spari, T. anguillae, T. anguisticauda and T. serrani is compared, the testes and the ovary is close to the ventral sucker. But in the present species T. olivaceus n. sp. the ovary is far posterior from the ventral sucker.

In T. pseudorhombi, T. magna and T. serrani the uterus does not reach in the ecsoma as in the present species; while in T. spari the position is entirely different. Here the uterus coils down on the tail where it turns to the right and passes forward on the ventral side of the right caecum. In T. anguillae the tail region is a little longer than the body proper so the uterine coils extend into the tail as far as its middle. In T. anguisticauda the uterus is extensive and occupies a major portion of the body space between the ventral sucker to the proximal part of the tail.

T. magnacetabulum Yamaguti, 1939 is extraordinary different from all other species in having four times large acetabulum than the oral sucker. Pars prostatica very long as in T. anguillae. Seminal vesicle posterior to ventral sucker. One of the two testes is contagious with the ovary which is at a negligible distance to the acetabulum. Uterus extending into the anterior part of the tail region.

T. pseudorhombi Yamaguti, 1938 in Pseudorhombus pentopthalmus; regarded by Manter (1954), as a syn. of T. spari despite difference in egg size.

The present new species, therefore, is distinctly different from the previously described species of the genus in having a combination of characters such as ventral sucker at least 3 times larger than the oral sucker, vitellaria situated more anteriorly with relatively small winding tubules, uterus does not reach in ecsoma and tail is relatively short.

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Neelofer Shaukat and Fatima Mujib Bilqees Department of Zoology, Jinnah University for Women, Nazimabad, Karachi-74600, Pakistan Corresponding author: ms.neelofer@hotmail.com 0030-9923/2011/0004-0715 $ 8.00/0 Copyright 2011 Zoological Society of Pakistan.
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Publication:Pakistan Journal of Zoology
Article Type:Report
Geographic Code:9PAKI
Date:Aug 31, 2011
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