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A MONKEY THING.

Inside the plate glass window, I'm putting my whites in, and bleach, and my denims, and lights, darks, and hots and handwashes, when the tourbus grinds to the curb outside to drop the teenage Southwest Drum and Bugle Corps at Clean Laundry, South Philly. There it idles, its slab sides silver, decaled script and musical notes America-colored. The kids debark pell-mell and fill, apologetically, the aisle between the washers and dryers, politely vying to put loads in, bonking their duffels to the ground, pausing confused at the change machine chucking chains of quarters into their hands and the little basin. They excavate Tide pods their moms left like chocolates in their bag bottoms. One drops to the floor, I pick it up, in my hand it has the weight and flex of a small testicle. I hand it back.

I'm invisible as air in the interstices of their conversation. Caden, Corie, Braden, Jordan, Jaden or Jerry from Albuquerque or Pasadena made some mistake at last night's armory showcase, so they didn't win, but gave it their all, made strides and their best effort, they'll shake it off and, next year, nail it.

Are we going to see Suicide Squad this afternoon, a teen girl says to a boy group the aisle's full of. They lean at her with meaty lurches, swig from water bottles they unclip from belt loops and knapsacks.

But one kid's saying how this creepy teacher, he hits on girl students like all the time, it's gross ... Does it matter? Does it? In this light, matter? "Sorry, I'm a teacher," I say, "and a mom, and that shouldn't be happening. You should tell somebody in authority." They nod, shrug, turn to their affairs.

It's interesting, being invisible, watching myself utterly unwatched.

Sixteen, I said to the volleyball player, 28, from my co-ed all-ages JCC team, who flirted and drove me home after practice, "do you want to fool around?"

"Sounds nice," he said, never touching me, waiting for me to get out of the car, never offered to drive me home again. I heard he died young, though he lives in my mind today, with his bald spot, hard spike, already fattening belly.

If you get up early, in Paris, and walk to the zoo so you get in just as it opens, pay your way in, pass the other dispiriting exhibits, with the cud chewers, their tongues hanging out, and the sadness of thick-tailed leopards in cramped tiny jungle spaces, barely able to prowl down a hill; and ignoring the shitty peacocks, displaying their iridescent astonishments to no one who cares, with stressful screams like babies in pain; then you might round a corner--if you're early enough--to see the baboons come out, like clowns from an improbable car, released fighting from their unknowable indoor pens to the outdoor space along the artificial rockface where they spend their daytimes. And your baby girl, a perpetual warm lump in your arms, extends her arms toward them.

They were quiet all night, you believe, and if not free now, freer, and they flash, swing, jump, chatter, and shriek at each other. They're so killingly angry. Why don't they kill each other? There are so many of them, how could they fit inside wherever they are, nights, and do they hate? Is hate a monkey thing? Is anger a constant baboon state, or is it the tiniest opportunity in the suggestion of breeze on the outdoor air that changes things? It's like an energy, electric, transferring beast to beast to beast, any dissipation barely noticeable at first but there's an eventual stilling until, bored, they settle down to watch themselves watched.

How inexperienced I am. How inexperienced I still am.
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Author:Fried, Daisy
Publication:Subtropics
Article Type:Short story
Date:Mar 22, 2019
Words:708
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