Printer Friendly

A Look Back at the 20th century...

The 20th century proved to be the most revolutionary in metalcasting's history. With the dawn of the new millennium and as a tribute to the people and technological innovations that have shaped our industry's past, present and future, modern casting is taking a look back at some of the most important contributions of the century.

AFS Gold Medal Winners: 1940-1959

As the metalcasting industry's highest honor, the AFS Gold medals are awarded annually at the AFS Casting Congress to industry leaders who have made the greatest difference through outstanding technical, engineering, research, management, service and education contributions. There are six medals in all--named for William H. McFadden (WHM), Joseph S. Seaman (JSS), John H. Whiting (JHW), John A. Penton (JAP), Peter L. Simpson (PLS) and Thomas W. Pangborn (TWP). Following is a look back at the Gold Medal winners from 1940-59 (and a photo of them at the time of the award). Most biographical information covers accomplishments up to the time of the individual receiving the medal. The entire list of winners is available online at www.moderncasting.com.

Note: AFS was known as the American Foundrymaen's Assn. (AFA) through 1948.

1940

Nathaniel K.B. Patch [*] was awarded the JAP Gold Medal. He was a long-time employee of the Lumen Bearing Co., Buffalo, New York, where he retired in 1923. One of the original organizers of the American Brass Founders' Assn., he served as AFA president from 1930-31.

Frederick K. Vial [*] was awarded the JHW Gold Medal. A long-time employee of the Griffin Wheell Co. (he became a director and vice president), he had a profitable influence on the improvements in railway appliances and foundry methods.

Frederick A. Melmoth [*] Was awarded the JSS Gold Medal. He worked with Brown-Bayleys Steel Works, Lake and Elliott of Braintree, National Steel Foundry and Thos. Firth & Sons, Ltd., before taking a position with Detroit Steel Casting Co.

Harry W. Dietert [*] was awarded the WHM Gold Medal. A Hoyt lecturer in 1954 and AFS president from 1957-58, he began his career with U.S. Radiator Corp. before starting the Harry W. Dietert Co., one of the first companies devoted to foundry sand testing equipment.

1941

Charles E. Hoyt [*] was awarded the JSS Gold Medal. He was elected manager of exhibits at the time of AFA's incorporation and went on to become its secretary-treasurer and executive vice president. The industry's most acclaimed lecture, given at AFS' Casting Congress, is named in his honor.

Donald J. Reese [*] was awarded the JHW Gold Medal. As president of the Chicago Foundrymen's Club, he was instrumental in having this organization become AFA's first chapter. Much of is work was dedicated to the improvement of cupola melting of cast iron.

Max Kuniansky [*] was awarded the WHM Gold Medal. He worked with National Malleable Castings Co., American Cast Iron Pipe Co. and Lynchburg Foundry Co. He is noted for his contributions to the gray iron industry. He served as AFA president from 1947-48.

Fred L. Wolf [*] was awarded the JAP Gold Medal. He worked for the Ohio Brass Co. and is noted for his contributions to the nonferrous and malleable foundry industries.

1942

Alfred L. Boegehold [*] was awarded the JHW Gold Medal. He worked for Remington Arms & Ammunition Co., Bridgeport Brass Co. and General Motors Research Corp. He directed numerous research projects on malleable iron, cast iron, steel, nonferrous parts and powder metallurgy.

John E. Galvin [*] was awarded the JAP Gold Medal. He worked with Illinois Steel Co., Peru Steel Casting Co., American Steel Foundries and Ohio Steel Foundry Co., of which he became president in 1918.

1943

Rufus F. Harrington [*] was awarded the JAP Gold Medal. He spent his career with the Hunt-Spiller Manufacturing Co., where he became foundry superintendent and chief metallurgist. Dedicating most of his work to foundry sand control, he helped inaugurate the AFA's sand research program.

Carl F. Joseph [*] was awarded the WHM Gold Medal. He was well-known for his contributions to the development of pearlitic malleable iron. He was employed with Saginaw Malleable Iron Co., the Bureau of Aircraft Production and General Motors Research Laboratories.

1944

William G. Reichert [*] was awarded the JSS Gold Medal. He was known for his work with foundry sand control. After more than 20 years with the Singer Manufacturing Co., he became general foundry metallurgist at the American Brake Shoe Co. He maintained metallurgical control in more than 40 other foundries.

Alfred W. Gregg [*] was awarded the JHW Gold Medal. He worked with Bucyrus-Erie Co. Latrobe Steel Co., American Managanese Steel Co., Bonney Floyd Co., Farrell Cheek Foundry and the Whiting Corp. He championed the verter process for making steel castings.

1945

Robert E. Kennedy [*] was awarded the JSS Gold Medal. He was an Instructor in foundry practice at the Univ. of Illinois and worked with Mitchell Motor Car Co, Rumley Oil Paul Tractor Co., Stover Gas Engine Works, Central Foundry Co., Dunham Co. and Western Electric Co. He was involved in developing sand control, pattern standardization and improvement of foundry refractories.

Clarence E. Sims [*] was awarded the JAP Gold Medal. He worked with Anaconda Copper Mining Co., Michigan Electrochemical Co., R.W. Hunt Co., Aluminum Co. of Niagara, American Steel Foundries and Battelle Institute. He was a recognized authority on thermodynamics in the making of iron and steel.

1946

Hyman Bornstein [*] was awarded the WHM Gold Medal. A long-time research director at Deere and Co., AFA president from 1937-38 and a Hoyt Lecturer in 1957, he was regarded as one of the nation's leading metallurgists and an authority on cast iron.

Peter Blackwood [*] was awarded the JHW Gold Medal. He is known for his work on the centrifugal casting process and starting the foundry of Ford Motor Co. of Canada, Ltd.

Howard F. Taylor [*] was awarded the PLS Gold Medal. After working at the Naval Research Laboratory, he became a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The award given to the best AFS Casting Congress paper is named in his honor.

1947

Henry S. Washburn [*] was awarded the JSS Gold Medal. AFA president from 1940-41,he worked for the Plainville Casting Co.

Russell J. Allen [*] was awarded the JAP Gold Medal. He worked for Worthington Pump & Machinery Corp.

Harry M. St. John [*] was awarded the WHM Gold Medal. A Hoyt Lecturer in 1959, he spent the majority of his foundry career with Crane Co. as superintendent of its brass foundry. He is known for his research in nonferrous castings.

Richard A. Flinn, Jr. [*], was awarded the PLS Gold Medal. He worked for the International Nickel Co Central Research Laboratory, American Brake Shoe Co. and the Univ. of Michigan. He assisted in the development of high-chromium abrasion-resistant irons, copper alloy research and a cast steel car wheel that now is a standard. He was a Hoyt Lecturer in 1981.

1948

Egbert H. Ballard [*] was awarded the WHM Gold Medal. He worked for Thomson-Houston Electric Co and Massachusetts Steel Casting Co., which later was purchased by General Electric Co. (GE). AFA president from 1931-32, he became general superintendent of GE s foundries and pattern shops.

Peter E. Rentschler [*] was awarded the PLS Gold Medal. He joined Hamilton Foundry & Machine Co. in 1920 and became its president in 1927 and chairman in 1966. He is known for his work in promoting better housekeeping and safety practices in the foundry.

R.G. McElwee [*] was awarded the JAP Gold Medal. He worked for Muncie foundry & Machine Co., General Motors Truck Co., American Car & Foundry Co. and Ecorse Foundry Co. He is known for his efforts on behalf of AFA's Cupola Research Project.

1949

Russell J. Anderson [*] was awarded the PLS Gold Medal. Works manager for Belle City Malleable Iron Co., he was chairman of the AFS Wisconsin Chapter and was instrumental in establishing the foundry exhibit at the Wisconsin State Centennial Exposition.

Gosta Vennerholm [*] was awarded the WHM Gold Medal. He spent 25 years with Ford Motor Co., and is the co-discoverer of many cast alloys and casting methods in the ferrous field.

Silvio C. Massari [*] was awarded the JHW Gold Medal. He worked for the Illinois Zinc Co., the Assn. of Manufacturers of Chilled Car Wheels and Hansell-Elcock Co. A long-time AFS technical director, he was a Hoyt Lecturer in 1956.

Richard Schneidewind [*] was awarded the WHM Gold Medal. A former professor at the Univ. of Michigan, he is known for his contributions to the advancement of research, education and consultation in the foundry industry. He conducted extensive research on malleable and gray irons.

1950

Clarence H. Lorig [*] was awarded the JSS Gold Medal. He worked for Wisconsin Appleton Co., French Battery Co. and the Univ. of Wisconsin. He spent 35 years with the Battelle Institute before retiring in 1965.

1951

Alfred A. Boyles [*] was awarded the JHW Gold Medal. He worked for U.S. Steel, Battelle Memorial Institute and U.S. Steel, Battelle Memorial Institute and U.S. Pipe and foundry Co., where he spent more than 25 years. In addition to his studies on the mechanism of graphitization of gray cast iron, he obtained several patents pertaining to methods for the centrifugal casting of cast iron pipe.

Victor A. Crosby [*] was awarded the JAP Gold Medal. He worked with Dodge Brothers, Packard Motor Car Co., Studebaker Corp. and Climax Molybdenum co., where he spent al most 25 years. He was active in formulating new ferrous foundry techniques.

Thomas W. Curry [*] was awarded the PLS Gold Medal. He worked for Danville Iron & Steel Corp., Kennedy Van Saun Foundry, York Corp. and Lynchburg Foundry Co., where he spent 25 years, becoming vice president of technical services. He is a former president of the Foundry Educational Foundation.

Albert Portevin [*] was awarded the JSS Gold Medal. He is known for his study of steels and their heat treatment, the theory of alloys, their properties and the study of their structure, and investigations on pig iron and foundry practices. He was a professor at the Ecole Superieure de Fonderie.

1952

Albert P. Gagnebin [*] and Keith D. Millis [*] were awarded the PLS Gold Medal. As co-recipients, they are known for their work in the commercial development of ductile iron in the Research and Development Div. of INCO. Millis was a Hoyt Lecturer in 1972, Foundry Educational Foundation president from 1967-68 and executive director of the Ductile Iron Society from 1975-90.

Henton Morrogh was awarded the WHM Gold Medal. He is well-known for his work on the solidification and structure of cast iron and was an important contributor to the development of ductile iron. A Hoyt Lecturer in 1962, he was director of the British Cast Iron Research Assn. The announcement of his 1948 research on ductile iron by rare earths prompted the INCO announcement by Gagnebin and Millis.

Frank G. Steinehach [*] was awarded the JAP Gold Medal. In a career that spanned 45 years, he was the editor and publisher of Foundry magazine and a Foundry Educational Foundation president.

William Romanoff [*] was awarded the JSS Gold Medal & Co. He is known for his knowledge of brass and bronze foundry practices and his work with the American Society of Testing Materials in standardizing workable specifications for copper-base casting alloys.

1953

James H. Smith [*] was awarded the PLS Gold Medal. He began his career with General Motors Corp. moving from the Saginaw ProdLecturer in 1953, he was an AFS director and president of the Malleable Founders' Society.

William J. Grede [*] was a warded the WHM Gold Medal. A Hoyt Lecturer in 1960, he was the first foundryman to serve as president of the National Assn. of Manufacturers and was influential in the development of foundry cost accounting methods. He founded Grede Foundries, Inc., which comprises 12 plants all over the world.

Daniel E. Krause [*] was awarded the JHW Gold Medal. He worked with Sivyer Steel Casting Co., Brillion Iron Works, Battelle Memorial Institute and the Gray Iron Research Institute. He developed methods for improved control of metallurgical characteristics of cast irons.

1954

Roy A. Gezelius [*] was awarded the PLS Gold Medal. He worked in government research and industry before joining General Steel Castings Corp. He is known for his contributions to the steel casting industry, particularly in the development and production of cast armor plate.

Thomas E. Eagan [*] was awarded the JSS Gold Medal. He worked with Simonds Saw & Steel Co., Crucible Steel Co. of America, Midvale Co. and the Cooper-Bessemer Corp. He participated in the first commercial heat of ductile iron at Cooper-Bessemer in 1949.

Walter E. Sicha [*] was awarded the WHM Gold Medal. He spent his entire career with the Aluminum Co. of America. A noted researcher of light metals casting alloys, he was a Hoyt Lecturer in 1963.

1955

John B. Caine [*] was awarded the JHW Gold Medal. Known for sand research, he was a technical consultant to the foundry industry and a member of several societies and AFS technical committees. He was a Hoyt Lecturer in 1961.

John E. Rehder was awarded the PLS Gold Medal. He worked for Walker Metal Products, Bowmanville, Ontario Foundry Co., Grinnell Co. of Canada and Canada Iron Foundries, Ltd. He devoted much of his research to producing malleable iron.

Robert F. Thomson was awarded the JAP Gold Medal. He worked for Republic Steel Co., Chrysler Corp., International Nickel Co. and General Motor Corp.'s Research Laboratories Div., where he spent 27 years. He is a co-holder of 27 patents relating to metallurgical processes and materials.

1956

Charles C. Sigerfoos [*] was awarded the TWP Gold Medal. He worked at New York Central Rail Road Foundry and Williams Brothers Brass Foundry before becoming a professor at Purdue and Michigan State Univ.

James S. Vanick [*] was awarded the WHM Gold Medal. The first technical director of the Ductile Iron Society, he worked for the British Ministry of Munitions and the International Nickel Co He is recognized for his promotion of the development of NiBral for ship propellors, which reduced cavitation damage on the U.S. transatlantic speed-record-holding liner.

Harold F. Bishop [*] was awarded the JSS Gold Medal. During a long-lasting career with the Naval Research Laboratory, he contributed to castings research.

1957

Charles K. Donoho [*] was awarded the PLS Gold Medal. Chief metallurgist and technical director at American Cast Pipe Co., he is known for his contributions to AFS and to the ferrous casting industry, especially in gray and ductile iron and steel.

Clyde A. Sanders [*] was awarded the JHW Gold Medal. A former president of American Colloid Co., he was an AFS president from 1970-71 and a Hoyt Lecturer in 1973. He contributed heavily to sand practice and foundry technology.

Johannes C.A. Croning [*] was awarded the JAP Gold Medal. He is credited for inventing the shell molding process.

1958

Ralph A. Clark was awarded the JAP Gold Medal. Known for his contributions in the field of gray iron metallurgy, he worked with Cadillac Motor Co., D.J. Ryan Foundry Co. and Lakey Foundry Co. before joining Electro Metallurgical Co.

Howard J. Rowe [*] was awarded the WHM Gold Medal. He spent several years working with Aluminum Co. of America's Castings Div. He contributed to the light metals branch of the casting industry.

William W. Maloney [*] was awarded the JSS Gold Medal. He was an established journalist in the foundry industry. He was induced by AFS to publish Transactions and Bulletins, its first magazine and the forerunner to American Foundryman and modern casting. He also was AFS' general manager.

1959

Harold W. Lownie, Jr. [*], was awarded the JHW Gold Medal. He worked for Battelle Memorial Institute and was known for his contributions in gray iron.

John A. Rassenfoss [*] was awarded the PLS Gold Medal. A Hoyt Lecturer in 1977, he spent 42 years working for Amsted Industries, Inc.

Fred J. Walls [*] was awarded the JAP Gold Medal. He worked with Wilson Foundry & Machine Co., Eaton-Erb Foundry, Engineering Castings, Inc. and International Nickel Co., where he spent 24 years. An AFS president from 1945-46 and a Hoyt Lecturer in 1955, he is well-known for his contributions to gray iron metallurgy.

(*.) Deceased
COPYRIGHT 2000 American Foundry Society, Inc.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2000, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:Modern Casting
Date:Aug 1, 2000
Words:2658
Previous Article:Safety Alert: Duct Fires in Foundries.
Next Article:Focus on the Fundamentals.


Related Articles
A Look back at the 20th century. . .
A Look Back at the 20th century.
A Look Back at the 20th century[ldots].
A Look Back at the 20th century[ldots].
A Look Back at the 20th century...Spectrometers.
A Look Back at the 20th century...
20TH CENTURY INSURERS REPORT EARNINGS BELOW EXPECTATIONS.
ONE THE SHELF: BOOKS FOR ALL REASONS : LACHAPELLE'S VISION.
WORLD NEEDS TO HONOR COURAGE AS PRICE OF FREEDOM.
The Black History Quiz Book.

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2019 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters