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A DOSE OF THE NEXT BIG THING; Barrowland crowd turn welcome up to 11 for Barrowland crowd turn welcome up to 11 for The Vaccines as band show they've got 'X-factor' The Vaccines as band show they've got 'X-factor'.

Byline: DAVID POLLOCK

the Vaccines. Barrowland, Glasgow, November 19 It's been a good autumn for London rock 'n' rollers The Vaccines.

No sooner have they finished an arena tour with Arctic Monkeys - a jaunt which saw them appear at Glasgow's SECC - than they're kicking off a tour of their own at the city's most infamously wild venue.

If they're truly up to taking on the mantle of most-loved band in the country from previous holders like the Arctics and their spiritual ancestors the Strokes, then this was the place to prove it.

It's unlikely the band will ever play to a more enthusiastic and appreciative audience, with the famous Barrowlands welcome having been turned up to eleven from the opening Blow It Up onwards.

Although the crowd would slow down throughout the relatively short set of a little over an hour, high points like the effortlessly catchy chorus of last single Wetsuit would spur them back into life again.

Despite their trying out a few poses and jumping up onto the drum riser for a little-backs-to-the-audience guitar playing every chance they got, the Vaccines don't much like the saviours of rock 'n' roll.

look much like the saviours of rock 'n' Singer Justin Young was wearing one their very own branded, preppy blue white, US college-style jackets, which him look like an extra from Happy Days.

Singer Justin Young was wearing one of very own branded, preppy blue and white, US college-style jackets, which made look like an extra from Happy Days. Bassist Arni Hj|rvar, meanwhile, has a flowing blond hairdo of which Michael Bolton in the 90s would have been proud a dainty, knees-together dance that Bassist Arni Hj|rvar, meanwhile, has flowing blond hairdo of which Michael Bolton in the 90s would have been proud and a dainty, knees-together dance that would have been better suited to a member of a twee indie band.

Guitarist Freddie Cowan and drummer Pete Robertson at least had the decency to blend into the background.

There's also something boyish and inoffensive about their music. The Strokesy Post Break-Up Sex features one of their more risqu lyrics, while All in White is a slow-paced retro number with a sturdy shoegaze bassline of the kind favoured by bands in the late 80s and early 90s.

Elsewhere, If You Wanna is an anthem worthy of an arena, while the main set closer Family Friend started off by going for a much too polite version of Spiritualized's spacey rock and ended on a hammering, finale.

An encore of We're Happening and N[degrees]rgaard was split by sincere thanks from Young, who told us "what fun we've had," and the audience was in wild agreement.

It had been a short, sharp show of anthems-in-waiting from a band who are destined to take Arctic Monkeys' place as SECC headliners one day soon.

Yet the Vaccines are also a work in progress at the moment, with one new song - the noisiest number here, with a lyric which spits "I don't really care about anybody else / I'm so self-obsessed" - at least suggesting they haven't reached their peak.

DAVID POLLOCK

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HAIRDO... Bassist Arni Hj|rvar 90s HAIRDO... Bassist Arni Hj|rvar
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Title Annotation:Features
Publication:Sunday Mail (Glasgow, Scotland)
Geographic Code:4EUUK
Date:Nov 27, 2011
Words:534
Previous Article:DEATH CAB FOR CUTIE; Glasgow Academy November 19.
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