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60SECONDS ON.. DELIRIUM.

Byline: Miriam Stoppard

Delirium is a sudden state of severe confusion, sometimes with agitation and hallucinations, in which the person is unresponsive to questioning.

Symptoms may include inability to concentrate and disorganised thinking accompanied by rambling, irrelevant or incoherent speech and it's always a medical emergency.

Delirium can be due to conditions such as low blood sugar (hypoglycaemia), lack of oxygen (hypoxia), high fever (hyperthermia), infection of the brain (encephalitis or meningitis), liver or kidney failure or head injury.

Delirium may last only a few hours or as long as several weeks or months.

The degree of recovery depends on the health and mental status of a person before the delirium. People in better health are more likely to recover fully.

The first goal of treatment is to address any underlying causes or triggers by stopping medication or infection. The next step focuses on calming the brain.
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Title Annotation:Features; Opinion, Column
Publication:The Mirror (London, England)
Date:Oct 10, 2011
Words:147
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