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24/7; time and temporality in the network society.

9780804751971

24/7; time and temporality in the network society.

Ed. by Robert Hassan and Ronald E. Purser.

Stanford U. Press

2007

284 pages

$29.95

Paperback

HM656

This collection of 13 articles traces the repercussions of the rapidly accelerating rate of change in rapidly accelerating modern life. They cover how our perspectives have changed, how network time is now natural time, how we have come to change our thinking about speed as a function of distance over time, how machine time differs in the Viterbi Algorithm, how The Matrix and other pop culture explains their time imagery, the retreat of the old present and the advance of the new, the management of self and of others and how such action works for and against the presence of the network and the subjectivity of time, the state of being out of the times, the limits of fast capital, the place of trust in network organizations, and regimes of time in a networked society.

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Publication:Reference & Research Book News
Article Type:Book Review
Date:Aug 1, 2007
Words:170
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