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2009 honorees of the U.S. Army Chemical Corps.

Hall of Fame Inductees

The U.S. Army Chemical Corps Hall of Fame award is the highest form of recognition offered by the Regiment. This coveted award honors those who have made landmark contributions to the overall history and traditions of the Chemical Corps or continue to work in ways that benefit the Corps. These individuals have distinguished themselves through advances in science and technology, a lifetime of service and devotion to the Corps, or gallantry in battle. The ranks of the Hall of Fame are inundated with scientists who tirelessly worked to protect the force through innovations and with Soldiers who exemplified the tenets of courage and honor. The following individuals were inducted into the Hall of Fame on 25 June 2009:

Command Sergeant Major Peter L. Hiltner (Retired)

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Command Sergeant Major Peter L. Hiltner was born 19 October 1950 in Freeport, Minnesota. He joined the Minnesota National Guard as a combat infantryman in 1969. He completed basic and advanced individual training at Fort Lewis, Washington. In 1975, Hiltner received an honorable discharge; but he returned to active duty in 1978. He completed one station unit training at the U.S. Army Military Police School, Fort McClellan, Alabama, and was reclassified to the Chemical Corps in 1982.

Throughout his career, Command Sergeant Major Hiltner consistently excelled as a leader and Soldier mentor. As the command sergeant major of the 23d Area Support Group, Camp Humphreys, Korea, he was the senior advisor to the commander and program manager for more than 1,000 Soldiers providing maintenance and ordnance support to the U.S. Armed Forces in Korea. While serving as the command sergeant major of the 23d Chemical Battalion, Camp Carroll, Korea, Hiltner was responsible for the development and execution of chemical defense procedures and waste management training for more than 300 multinational personnel. As the command sergeant major of the 82d Chemical Battalion, Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, he was responsible for the program of instruction and management of basic and advanced individual training in nuclear, biological, and chemical (NBC) defense. He was also the first sergeant of the 4th Chemical Company, Camp Casey, Korea, and the 11th Chemical Company and Chemical Noncommissioned Officer (NCO) Academy, Fort McClellan. Command Sergeant Major Hiltner's other assignments included NBC NCO, 46th Engineer Battalion, Fort Rucker, Alabama; inspector, VII Corps Inspector General's Office, Stuttgart, Germany; instructor, Technical Escort Course, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama; smoke platoon sergeant, 4th Chemical Company; NBC NCO, C Company, 82d Engineer Battalion, Bamberg, Germany; senior military policeman, 79th Military Police Detachment, Fort McCoy, Wisconsin; and military policeman, 55th Military Police Company, Camp Market, Korea. Command Sergeant Major Hiltner completed two tours of duty in Germany and four tours of duty in Korea. He also participated in the defense of Saudi Arabia, the defense and liberation of Kuwait, and the Southwest Asia cease-fire campaigns.

Command Sergeant Major Hiltner completed the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy and the Command Sergeants Major Designee, First Sergeant, Battle Staff, Technical Escort, Inspector General, Advanced NCO, Chemical Basic Transition, and Primary Leadership Development Courses. He consistently exceeded course standards and graduated with honors. In addition, Hiltner earned a bachelor's degree in police administration from Columbia College and a master's degree in management from Webster University.

Command Sergeant Major Hiltner's awards include the Legion of Merit with two oak-leaf clusters, Bronze Star Medal, Meritorious Service Medal (3d award), Army Commendation Medal with six oak-leaf clusters, Army Achievement Medal with six oak-leaf clusters, Good Conduct Medal (8th Award), National Defense Service Medal with two service stars, Korean Defense Service Medal, Humanitarian Service Medal, Liberation of Kuwait Medal, Overseas Service Ribbon (5th award), NCO Professional Development Ribbon (4th award), Southwest Asia Service Medal, Honorable Order of the Dragon, and Ancient Order of the Dragon.

Command Sergeant Major Hiltner served as the 9th Chemical Regimental Command Sergeant Major from November 2002 to February 2004 and was subsequently named the 2d Honorary Sergeant Major of the Chemical Corps Regiment in July 2004. He also serves as the Vice Chairman, Chemical Corps Regimental Association (CCRA). In addition, he is an active member of the Fort Leonard Wood/Mid-Missouri Chapter of the Association of the U.S. Army and a member of the Fort Leonard Wood Sergeants Major Association.

Command Sergeant Major Hiltner (Retired) is currently the Director, Emergency Management and Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear Programs for MacAulay Brown (MacB), Incorporated, Fort Leonard Wood.

Private First Class Richard Hamilton Griffin

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Private First Class Richard Hamilton Griffin was born in 1925, and he grew up in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Asheville, North Carolina. As a child, Griffin was an active outdoorsman who belonged to the Boy Scouts of America. He and his two brothers were also model airplane enthusiasts. The Junior Birdmen of America chose them as their national poster boys, and President Franklin D. Roosevelt personally presented them with their brass wing pins.

Griffin obtained permission and volunteered to join the Army at the age of seventeen. He was assigned to B Company, 83d Chemical Mortar Battalion, which was attached to the Seventh Army (Europe) under the command of General George S. Patton. From 3 to 20 December 1944, the 83d supported the 36th Infantry Division, whose mission was to hold the entire right flank of the Seventh Army during the German Ardennes-Alsace campaign (also known as the Battle of the Bulge). The bulk of the defense rested with the 83d and their mortars. B Company participated in the repulse of four massive enemy counterattacks in the vicinity of Riquewihr (pronounced reek-veer), France.

(For more information on the 83d, see page 31.) During the early morning hours of 12 December, the entire front was attacked by the enemy and Griffin's platoon was surrounded. When the mortar positions of his platoon were threatened by a large force of enemy infantry, Private First Class Griffin rushed forward to man a machine gun outpost located 200 yards from his squad position. He calmly waited until the enemy column was within 100 yards and then opened fire--killing 10 enemy soldiers with his initial burst. His deadly fire forced the enemy to deploy and attempt to surround him. Despite the intense small arms, automatic-weapon, and light-mortar fire directed at him, Griffin clung to his position and continued firing. When he was hit by small arms fire in the right side of his body, he rolled over and began firing his machine gun with his left hand. Although hit a second time, he continued firing until his position was finally overrun by the enemy and he was killed. Through his courage and unselfish sacrifice, Private First Class Griffin gave his own life while saving the lives of many of his comrades. He was also instrumental in blunting the drive of superior enemy forces that threatened the security of a large sector of the front near Riquewihr.

Private First Class Griffin was posthumously awarded the Distinguished Service Cross--the highest medal for valor earned by a chemical Soldier in the history of the Regiment--for his extraordinary heroism in action. He was also awarded two Purple Hearts as a result of wounds he sustained while making the supreme sacrifice. In addition, Private First Class Griffin received the European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal and the World War II Victory Medal.

As a veteran of World War II, Private First Class Griffin was a member of what is known as the "Greatest Generation." As a Soldier, he epitomized the concept of a hero and a warrior. Private First Class Griffin knowingly and willingly made the ultimate sacrifice while defending his comrades, displaying the highest ideals of the Warrior Ethos and Army values more than fifty years before they were adopted as bedrock principles of the U.S. Army. Alhough his inclusion in the Hall of Fame is long overdue, his valor and sacrifice in the face of death should never be forgotten; rather, his actions should be brought to the attention of modern warriors to be recognized and emulated as our Soldiers fight the War on Terrorism with the knowledge that one of their own lives on in the U.S. Army Chemical Corps Hall of Fame.

Distinguished Members of the Chemical Corps Inductees

Five names were added to the list of outstanding individuals serving the U.S. Army Chemical Corps. The award of the Distinguished Member of the Chemical Corps title means that these individuals have not only served a lifetime of service in the Corps, but also support the Chief of Chemical in implementing his vision of what the Corps is and where it is going in the future. The following individuals were inducted into the 2009 Distinguished Members of the Chemical Corps on 25 June 2009:

Lieutenant Colonel Michael C. Lanphere (Retired)

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Lieutenant Colonel Michael C. Lanphere was born 18 April 1954 in Patterson, California. He entered the U.S. Army in 1978, and his first assignment was as the commander of a basic combat training company at Fort Dix, New Jersey. In addition to the responsibilities associated with command, such as the welfare of assigned Soldiers and oversight of training, Lanphere also served as the battalion executive officer and operations and training officer (S3). At the division staff level, Lieutenant Colonel Lanphere was responsible for the NBC Warning and Reporting Cell and he served as the Operations and Plans (G-3) Emergency Deployment Readiness Exercise project officer. He also served as a brigade chemical officer, brigade training officer, and brigade operations officer while assigned to brigade and staff positions at Fort Ord, California, and as a brigade chemical officer with the 205th Military Intelligence Brigade, V Corps, Frankfurt, Germany. As the force development officer with the Directorate of Combat Development, U.S. Army Chemical School, Fort McClellan, Lieutenant Colonel Lanphere assisted in directing and coordinating the redesign of the chemical force structure. He coordinated team efforts to test new designs and develop new doctrine, and he represented the Chemical School in making decisions regarding the downsizing and redesign of the Army to meet the changing threat. As the executive officer of the Chemical School, Lieutenant Colonel Lanphere was responsible for the battalion staff; he also coordinated the needs of five training companies and executed the command plan for the battalion. In addition, he worked extensively with the U.S. Department of State, U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, U.S. National Security Council, and Office of the Secretary of Defense on the development of the U.S. Government's position on treaties and agreements. Other areas of expertise included chemical weapons demilitarization and disposal, nonstockpile of chemical weapons, U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command inspections in Iraq, and annual chemical/biological intelligence reports to Congress. As the nonproliferation staff officer for the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Washington, D.C., Lieutenant Colonel Lanphere worked extensively with Congress and the Office of the Secretary of Defense on chemical/biological issues related to national security; he was also responsible for reviewing and writing joint NBC defense publications and updating Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff NBC defense publications. Finally, Lieutenant Colonel Lanphere served as the director of the Joint Service Integration Group Executive Office at Fort McClellan, where he was responsible for coordinating and integrating the NBC Defense Program.

Lieutenant Colonel Lanphere's military education includes Officer Candidate School, Field Artillery Officer Basic Course, Chemical Officer Basic Course, Combined Arms and Services Staff School, Command and General Staff College, U.S. Air Force Air Command and Staff College, and Joint Forces Staff College. In addition, he holds a bachelor's degree in history from California State University, Stanislaus.

Lieutenant Colonel Lanphere has received the following awards and honors: the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal (4th award), Army Commendation Medal with four oak-leaf clusters, Army Achievement Medal with three oak-leaf clusters, National Defense Service Medal, Good Conduct Medal, and Honorable Order of the Dragon. He was also nominated for a Presidential award that recognized volunteers in the military.

Lieutenant Colonel Lanphere (Retired) is currently a senior analyst/program manager with OptiMetrics, Inc., Anniston, Alabama. He continues to serve the Corps as president of the McClellan Chapter of the CCRA--the most active, most productive chapter of the CCRA.

Command Sergeant Major James A. Barkley (Retired)

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Command Sergeant Major James A. Barkley was born 29 May 1958 in Columbus, Ohio. He enlisted in the U.S. Army in September 1976.

Command Sergeant Major Barkley has held numerous leadership positions. His final active duty assignment was as the last chemical senior enlisted advisor and command sergeant major of the U.S. Army Soldier Biological and Chemical Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. He also served as the 8th Chemical Regimental Command Sergeant Major. Other previous assignments include commandant of the III Corps NCO Academy, Fort Hood, Texas; command sergeant major of 2d Chemical Battalion, Fort Hood; faculty advisor, U.S. Army First Sergeant Course; NCO in charge, V Corps NBC Course; first sergeant, 44th Chemical Company, 4th Infantry Division, Fort Hood; first sergeant, 54th Chemical Troop, 11th Armed Calvary Regiment (ACR), Fulda, Germany; first sergeant, Maintenance Troop, 11th ACR; first sergeant, 89th Chemical Company, 3d ACR, Fort Bliss, Texas; decontamination platoon sergeant, 89th Chemical Company; NCO in charge, 503d Chemical Detachment, Germany; and drill sergeant and drill instructor, 2d Basic Training Battalion, Fort McClellan.

Command Sergeant Major Barkley's military education includes the Primary Leadership Development Course, Basic NCO Course, Advanced NCO Course, Jungle Warfare Course, Master Fitness Course, Drill Sergeant School, Air Assault School, NBC Reconnaissance Course, Battle Staff Course, First Sergeant Course, Sergeants Major Academy, Command Sergeants Major Course, and more than 100 hours of other military and civilian training courses. He holds a bachelor's degree in management from Excelsior College, Albany, New York.

Some of Command Sergeant Major Barkley's awards include the Legion of Merit, Bronze Star Medal, Meritorious Service Medal (4th award), Army Commendation Medal with two oak-leaf clusters, Army Achievement Medal with six oak-leaf clusters, National Defense Service Medal, Kuwait Liberation Medal, Southwest Asia Medals, Drill Sergeant Identification Badge, Order of St. George, Ancient Order of the Dragon, and Honorable Order of the Dragon.

Command Sergeant Major Barkley is a lifetime member of the CCRA. He is also an annual member of the NCO Association, Association of the U.S. Army, and National Education Association.

After his retirement in 2004, Command Sergeant Major Barkley joined the U.S. Army North (ARNORTH) Civil Support Readiness Group. He served as a senior trainer and evaluator for weapons of mass destruction (WMD) civil support teams from 2004 to 2006 and as an operations officer from 2006 to 2008; he has served as the deputy team chief and operations officer for C Division since 2007. In his current position, Command Sergeant Major Barkley (Retired) designs, develops, and coordinates readiness training for fifty-five National Guard civil support teams; twelve National Guard chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and high-yield explosives (CBRNE) enhanced response force package units; and twenty-five U.S. Army Reserve decontamination reconnaissance and casualty decontamination companies in the ARNORTH area of operations. These organizations are engaged in CBRNE detection, identification, mitigation and, in some instances, elimination. Barkley does not just train chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) Soldiers--he mentors and coaches them. He continues to instill pride in members of the Chemical Corps. Through his leadership, Barkley has improved communication between the U.S. Army CBRN School and ARNORTH leaders regarding issues that affect CBRN Soldiers across the Regular Army and Reserve Components.

Command Sergeant Major Larry "Ken" Fisher (Retired)

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Command Sergeant Major Larry "Ken" Fisher was born 12 August 1959 in Boonville, Indiana. He entered the U.S. Army in June 1977 and died 12 July 2008.

Command Sergeant Major Fisher served as a rifleman, gunner, team leader, and squad leader with B Company, 1st Battalion, 325th Parachute Infantry Regiment, Fort Bragg, North Carolina. He was reassigned to the Chemical Corps in 1981, with his significant assignments including company NBC operations NCO, 522d Engineer Company, Fort Knox, Kentucky; battalion and brigade NBC operations NCO, 1st Brigade, 3d Armored Division, Fort Campbell, Kentucky; NBC operations NCO, 3d Brigade, 3d Armored Division, Germany; NBC operations NCO, 3d Brigade, 101st Airborne Division, Fort Campbell; and platoon and first sergeants, 63d Chemical Company, Fort Campbell. As the first sergeant of the 63d Chemical Company during Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm, Fisher deployed to Southwest Asia. Following his return, he served as NBC operations NCO, 4th Special Forces Group, Fort Campbell, and was again deployed to Southwest Asia. Fisher also served as operations sergeant and first sergeant, U.S. Army Chemical Activity, Pacific, Johnston Atoll, and as NBC operations NCO, 160th Special Operations Aviation Group, Fort Campbell (from which he was deployed to Southwest Asia a third time). He then returned to the U.S. Army Chemical Activity, Pacific, as command sergeant major. His final military assignment was as Command Sergeant Major, 3d Chemical Brigade, Fort Leonard Wood.

Command Sergeant Major Fisher excelled in some of the most difficult U.S. Army Chemical Corps positions in some of the U.S. Army's most elite units. He was named NCO of the month, quarter, and year five times at battalion, brigade, and division levels.

Command Sergeant Major Fisher's military education started with the Infantry Basic Course and U.S. Army Airborne School. He also completed the Primary Leadership Development Course, Jumpmaster Course, Basic NCO Course, Advanced NCO Course, Air Assault School, First Sergeant Course, Defense Language Institute (where he learned Persian and Farsi), Technical Escort Course, Battle Staff NCO Course, Sergeants Major Academy, and Command Sergeants Major Course. In addition, he completed more than twenty other military courses that were forty hours or more in length. He also earned an associate's degree in general studies from Park University and was working toward a bachelor's degree in emergency management at the time of his death.

Command Sergeant Major Fisher's awards and decorations include the Legion of Merit, Bronze Star Medal, Meritorious Service Medal (6th award), Joint Service Commendation Medal, Army Commendation Medal with four oak-leaf clusters, Army Achievement Medal with six oak-leaf clusters, National Defense Service Medal with two service stars, Army Service Ribbon, Overseas Service Ribbon (3d award), NCO Professional Development Ribbon (4th award), Good Conduct Medal (7th award), Southwest Asia Service Medal with three service stars, Kuwait Liberation Medal, Army Superior Unit Award, Senior Parachutist Badge, Air Assault Badge, Egyptian Airborne Wings, Honorable Order of the Dragon, and Ancient Order of the Dragon.

Mr. C. Ray Nagin, the mayor of New Orleans, Louisiana, proclaimed a "Special Day of Honor" for Command Sergeant Major Fisher for his role as operations chief on the Mayor's Advisory Council for Citizens With Disabilities--a role in which he assisted persons with disabilities in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

Sergeant Major Kimberly J. Garrick (Retired)

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Sergeant Major Kimberly J. Garrick was born 13 June 1958 in Jefferson Township, New Jersey. She entered the U.S. Army in April 1977.

During her military service, Sergeant Major Garrick held numerous leadership positions. She was the first female in the Chemical Corps to achieve the rank of sergeant major. Her last active duty assignment was as the personnel proponency sergeant major of the U.S. Army Chemical School, Fort Leonard Wood. As the sergeant major of the Directorate of Training, U.S. Army Chemical School, Fort McClellan, Garrick administered the successful relocation of the Chemical School from Fort McClellan to Fort Leonard Wood. She also served as the first sergeant for Headquarters Company, 4th Combat Aviation Brigade, Hanau, Germany, and as the first sergeant for Headquarters and Headquarters Detachment, 180th Transportation Battalion, Fort Hood--a position from which she deployed with her unit in support of Operation Desert Shield/ Desert Storm two weeks after her appointment. Sergeant Major Garrick completed five overseas tours and devoted more than twenty-four years of service to the U.S. Army.

Sergeant Major Garrick completed the Sergeants Major Academy and the Technical Escort, Chemical Operations Specialist, Primary Leadership Development, Telecommunications Center Operations, Battle Staff, and First Sergeant Courses. She holds a bachelor's degree in education and a master's degree in educational administration from Jacksonville State University, Alabama.

Sergeant Major Garrick (Retired) is a member of the National Education Association and Alabama Education Association. She has also mentored young people through the Legacy Club Advisor Program and the Enrichment Services Program in Anniston, Alabama. As a member of the CCRA, she has delivered numerous speeches to military organizations and has served as a Chemical Corps spokesperson.

Sergeant Major Garrick's military awards include the Legion of Merit, Bronze Star Medal, Meritorious Service Medal (2d award), Army Commendation Medal with six oak-leaf clusters, Army Achievement Medal with nine oak-leaf clusters, Meritorious Unit Commendation, Good Conduct Medal (8th award), National Defense Service Medal, Overseas Service Ribbon (4th award), Southwest Asia Service Medal with three service stars, the Kuwait Liberation Medal, and the Honorable Order of the Dragon.

After her retirement, Sergeant Major Garrick volunteered with the Anniston school system and the American Red Cross. Then, she transformed her ability to mentor young people into a career in education--first by teaching second and fourth grades and now as the interim principal of Constantine Elementary School in Anniston.

Sergeant Major Garrick has made tremendous contributions above and beyond the normal scope of her duties. She has voluntarily spoken to countless men, women, and children about her experiences and accomplishments in the Chemical Corps. And she has never forgotten her predecessors. In one interview, Garrick stated, "The reason I was able to accomplish my successes was because of the women in the service who went before me and paved the way." Throughout her career and following her retirement, Sergeant Major Garrick has enhanced the cohesiveness, legacy, and esprit de corps of military members and civilians by mentoring, advising, and coaching them to be better U.S. citizens.

Dr. Peter J. Stopa

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Dr. Peter J. Stopa was born 26 March 1953 in Newark, New Jersey. He earned an American Chemical Society-certified bachelor's degree in biochemistry in 1975 and a master's degree in 1977 from the University of Scranton, Pennsylvania. He then continued graduate study in analytical chemistry at Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, and the University of New Hampshire. In 1999, he successfully defended his dissertation on "The Use of Flow Cytometry for the Detection and Identification of Biological Warfare Agents" before the scientific board of the Military Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Warsaw, Poland, earning a doctorate degree in microbiology. He was the first American to obtain a doctorate degree in microbiology in this manner.

At the time of his death in 2006, Dr. Stopa was a physical scientist with the U.S. Army Research, Development, and Engineering Command, Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, Aberdeen Proving Ground. He was assigned to the Engineering Directorate, where he made significant contributions to the Department of Defense Biological Defense Program. During his most recent project, he served as the technical coordinator for the Military Applications in Reconnaissance and Surveillance Program, designing experimental payloads for biological detection and identification using robotic platforms. Dr. Stopa also supported the Office of Defense Cooperation at the U.S. Embassy in Warsaw by serving as the informational exchange officer for a U.S.-Poland biological defense information exchange program. In addition, he was a certified instructor for the Edgewood Chemical Biological Center Homeland Defense Program and he taught several courses on WMD. He was instrumental in the development and fielding of the first biological warfare capability for the U.S. Army during Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm. The technologies that were developed, tested, and fielded during this effort were incorporated into biological defense systems that support warfighters who are in the field today. In addition to participating on the team that developed technologies which were later fielded in the nondevelopmental item and P31 Biological Integrated Detection System units, Dr. Stopa initiated efforts to provide first responders with the capability to sample for, and detect the presence of, biological agents in suspect samples. This effort (which was in response to the Aum Shinrikyo sarin attack on the subway system in Tokyo, Japan) led to the development of the Biological Detection Kit, which integrated sampling and detection equipment for use by first responders at a possible biological WMD site. Dr. Stopa's previous positions included research chemist, U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Fort Detrick, Maryland; immunochemist, Becton, Dickinson, and Company, Hunt Valley, Maryland; and research technician, Eudowood Division, Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.

Dr. Stopa received numerous awards and accolades for his contributions to the defense against WMD. Among them are two Technology Transfer Program awards, the Commander's Award for Civilian Service, fourteen performance awards, six Special Act or Service Awards, four quality step increases, and an incentive cash award. In addition to these awards, Dr. Stopa was a prolific WMD researcher and writer, contributing more than twenty articles to professional journals and other professional venues.

Ms. Lindberg is the assistant historian at the U.S. Army CBRN School History Office, Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri.
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Author:Lindberg, Christy
Publication:CML Army Chemical Review
Date:Dec 22, 2009
Words:4173
Previous Article:Reserve component update.
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