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1992 Summer Program Awards.

THIS IS THE SECOND PART OF OUR FEATURED SUMMER PROGRAM AWARD WINNERS. FOUR WINNING CAMPS WERE HIGHLIGHTED IN OUR

APRIL/MAY 1993 ISSUE. SUMMER CAMP PROGRAMS PROVIDE OPPORTUNITIES FOR UNIQUE SOCIAL, RECREATIONAL AND EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCES. WINNING PROGRAMS INCLUDE INTERACTION WITH PEERS WHO DO NOT HAVE DISABILITIES, PARENTAL PARTICIPATION AND COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT. BELOW WE FEATURE THE SIXTH OF OUR WINNING CAMPS. WE ALSO INCLUDE DESCRIPTIONS OF THE CAMPS RECEIVING COMMENDATIONS ON PAGES 26 & 27. WE CONGRATULATE THE CAMPS FOR PROVIDING MUCH-NEEDED SERVICES FOR CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES.

Hole in the Wall Gang Camp

The Hole in the Wall Gang Camp, founded by Paul Newman, is a nonprofit residential summer camp for children with cancer and serious blood conditions. Eight hundred children ages 7 to 15 from all over the United States and abroad attend each year, free of charge. Objectives include helping the children develop the physical and emotional strength to cope with a difficult present and future.

Unobtrusive medical services are administered by physicians and nurses from Yale-New Haven Hospital and other leading medical institutions under the on-site supervision of Dr. Howard Pearson, M.D. The fully equipped medical dispensary is available 24 hours a day for general medical and emergency care.

The camp is designed after the logging towns of the early 1890s. The trappings of a medical facility are avoided everywhere, and the infirmary looks like a 19th century mill.

The camp offers seven 10-day sessions from late June to late August in which children pursue their own special interests and activities, such as dramatic and musical productions, creative journal writing, craft-making, nature classes and various sports.

The camp also provides year-round health care seminars, recreational and educational programs, family retreats, treatment support services and reunions for campers, their families and health care professionals.

THIS YEAR WE RECEIVED NOMINATIONS FROM TWO CAMPS SPECIALIZING IN ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY. WE HAVE HONORED THESE CAMPS WITH SPECIAL COMMENDATIONS TO RECOGNIZE THE UNIQUE NATURE OF THEIR PROGRAMS AND THE SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES THEY PROVIDE TO BOTH CAMPERS AND THEIR FAMILIES.

ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY COMMENDATION

IEP + Camp

Children's Specialized Hospital in Mountainside, N.J., hosts a summer camp program called IEP + Camp for nonspeaking children who use augmentative and alternative communication systems. All children attending the camp use a Minspeak(TM) communication system with the Interaction, Education and Play(C) software.

Two week-long camp sessions, the first for ages 5 to 7 and the second for ages 9 to 13 are held. Two community agencies play a primary role in the operation of the camp program. The Westlake School provided classroom space and Trailside Nature and Sciences Center offered daily programs and a true camp atmosphere. By the end of each camp session, children and parents alike have enhanced their skills in communicating with IEP+. Parents also develop a strong support network. Plans are underway to create an advanced level camp so these children and their parents can return to the program.

Project MAC

Project MAC (Mainstreaming at Camp), sponsored by the Young Adult Institute in cooperation with the Frost Valley YMCA, serves children and young adults with developmental delays. Project MAC is dedicated to integrating and mainstreaming all campers according to individual ability and providing an educational and fun summer experience.

Campers attend from two to five weeks and participate in a variety of sports, arts and crafts, horseback riding, swimming, hiking, archery and physical education, all supervised by trained staff members.

Activities are designed to promote friendships and build self-confidence, teach decision-making skills, responsibility and cooperation and foster independence.

Project MAC also has a Wellness Program which promotes physical and mental well-being through nutritional meals, a fitness and exercise program and self-care training.

Camp Fairlee Manor

Camp Fairlee Manor runs five week-long sessions during July and August and offers activities adapted to the age and ability of campers with disabilities to help them achieve independence.

The camp features a wheelchair-accessible swimming pool and garden, hiking trails, a bass-stocked farm pond, a petting zoo, nature study, canoeing, camp-outs, arts and crafts and sports and recreation. All buildings, bathrooms and walkways are accessible, and side-walks are textured for those with visual impairments.

Campers are aided by 15 trained counselors and two nurses. The camp now serves as many as 300 campers of all ages and disabilities during the summer season.

Talking with Technology Camp

Talking With Technology Camp (TWT), affiliated with the Children's Hospital of Denver and the Colorado Easter Seal's Handicamp Program, is a one-week camp for young people ages 6 to 21 who use augmentative communication systems. Campers learn to do more with their systems while professionals see how communication impacts their patients' lives and environment.

Each camper who uses the augmentative communication system usually attends with a professional who knows the child. Siblings may also attend the program. Parents do not attend, although they do have contact with the professionals and other staff.

Campers receive individualized instruction in using their augmentative communication systems. They also participate in traditional activities like fishing, horseback riding, swimming and sports. Activities such as talent shows are geared to help children use their systems in fun and creative ways.

Camp Echo Aquatic Camp

Camp Echo is an overnight camp for boys ages 9 to 16 who have one or more limb deficiencies and/or mobility impairment. Enrollment is limited to 10 spaces in each of the two-week sessions. The camp is designed to teach water activities, including swimming, sailing, canoeing and motor boat sports such as water skiing, knee boarding and tubing. Also included is a four-day wilderness canoe trip to nothern Maine. Adaptive aquatic techniques utilize a "ski boom" for water skiing and knee boarding and a sit-ski for campers who require support to stand.

The camp cannot provide attendants for boys who need help with personal care, but it does accept boys in wheelchairs if they can function independently. Medical supervision is available 24 hours a day. A one-to-one staff to camper ratio is available when necessary.

Cedar Haven Summer Prog.

The Cedar Haven Summer Program is designed for children with special physical, emotional and educational needs in the West Bend area. More than 60 infants and children with cerebral palsy, developmental delays, learning disabilities and mental retardation attend the nine-week program. Each child is evaluated prior to admission, insurance or alternative funding is verified, and scheduling for their appropriate therapy sessions and a county grant-funded recreational component is designed to fit their needs. Physical, occupational and speech therapy sessions are available. Games, crafts, music therapy and weekly swimming sessions make up the recreational component of the summer program at Cedar Haven.

The three requirements for enrollment are: The child must be between the ages of 0 and 13 years old, require one or more of the specific therapies (physical, occupational and speech) and have a physician's order. Enrollment is limited so early registration is suggested.
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Title Annotation:part 2 of a series on camps for handicapped children
Publication:The Exceptional Parent
Date:Jun 1, 1993
Words:1140
Previous Article:The merry-go-round.
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