Printer Friendly

1992 HOLIDAY SEASON TO SEE RECORD-SETTING CONFECTIONERY SALES; AMERICANS NOW UNDERSTAND SWEET TRUTH ABOUT CONFECTIONERY

 1992 HOLIDAY SEASON TO SEE RECORD-SETTING CONFECTIONERY SALES;
 AMERICANS NOW UNDERSTAND SWEET TRUTH ABOUT CONFECTIONERY
 NEW YORK, Nov. 13 /PRNewswire/ -- Each American will gobble up nearly two pounds of candy canes, chocolate Santas, and other festive confections this holiday season, according to confectionery industry estimates. That translates into a banner year for the confectionery industry, which expects holiday season sales to top $1.23 billion -- an increase of 2 percent over last year. On average, each American will spend $5 for Christmas and Hanukkah candy in 1992.
 According to the National Confectioners Association (NCA), candy consumption has risen 30 percent since 1980. Fueling this increase is a better consumer understanding of the role of confectionery within a healthy lifestyle. A recent NCA survey found greater public acceptance of candy and the role it can play in a nutritious diet.
 "More than two-thirds of Americans surveyed in late 1991 believe that candy fits into their diet and lifestyle," says Lawrence T. Graham, president of the McLean, Va.-based NCA.
 Not surprisingly, the percentage of people who will give candy as a Christmas gift has also increased over the past five years, from 28 percent in a 1987 survey to 36 percent in 1991.
 "Candy is an ideal gift, especially during the holiday season," said Mr. Graham. "It's a relatively inexpensive family tradition that everyone can enjoy." Confections also can enhance a gift's value when used creatively for decoration, such as embellishing plain gift-wrap with starlight mints or filling an otherwise ordinary glass pitcher with red and green foil-wrapped chocolates.
 Holiday celebrants who wish to learn the sweet truth about those chocolate-covered cherries, caramels, and Santa-faced lollipops can receive a free brochure from the NCA listing the nutrient content of nearly two dozen popular confections. Send a self-addressed stamped envelope to "The Sweet Truth About Confectionery," 708 Third Ave., New York, NY 10017.
 HOLIDAY QUICK FACTS
 Did you know that....
 -- Americans will consume nearly two pounds of Christmas candy each. Total sales for holiday confectionery are expected to reach $1.23 billion in 1992. (Source: NCA)
 -- The 1.2 billion candy canes that will be made for the holiday season are enough to circle the globe three times. (Source: NCA)
 -- A one-ounce after-dinner mint has only 113 calories and only one gram of fat. Twenty gummy candies have only 93 calories and less than a gram of fat. A quarter-ounce toffee has less than 27 calories and almost no fat. (Source: NCA)
 -- More than a third of Americans plan to give candy as a Christmas gift. Women are almost 50 percent more likely to give candy as a Christmas gift than are men. Adults over the age of 55 are nearly 75 percent more likely to give candy as a Christmas gift than are adults under the age of 34. (Source: NCA)
 -- Nostalgia and a return to "basics" are this year's strongest trends, with an emphasis on yesterday's elegance. Decorations that allow consumers to express their creativity are gaining ground. Classic reds and greens are "in" this season, along with natural-looking ornaments and heirlooms. (Source: Selling Christmas Decorations)
 -- Recession-weary shoppers looking for value are buying more jumbo rolls of giftwrap this year. (Source: Selling Christmas Decorations)
 -- Retail grocery sales are higher in December than at any other time of the year. (Source: Progressive Grocer)
 -- An estimated 2.3 billion Christmas cards will be sold in 1992. Traditional lines are more popular than anything else by far. (Source: Greeting Card Association; Gibson Greetings)
 -- More than 100,000 people are employed full- or part-time in the Christmas tree growing industry. (Source: National Christmas Tree Association)
 -- The average growing time for a six-foot Christmas tree is seven years. The top-selling Christmas trees are Scotch Pine (36 percent) and Douglas Fir (20 percent). (Source: National Christmas Tree Association)
 SOLVING HOLIDAY GIFT DILEMMAS THE TRADITIONAL WAY
 When those last brown leaves begin their descent to the ground and the winter coats start to come out of storage, that exciting yet uneasy feeling comes over us as our thoughts drift to "holiday gift shopping."
 But this year you can squelch those "what-do-I-buy" blues immediately. Instead of sifting through gift lists of holidays past, put a new creative spin on holiday season '92 with a well-loved seasonal tradition: candy.
 "Confectionery has long been a part of the holiday spirit," says Lawrence T. Graham, president of the National Confectioners Association (NCA). "And surveys show that these days more and more Americans are likely to give candy as a Christmas gift. It's an inexpensive way to give friends and family a holiday lift."
 A box of chocolates is always a welcome gift, and a wide enough variety abounds to suit just about everyone's taste and budget. For people with a few spare minutes and a dash of creativity, candy also makes a wonderfully versatile "ingredient" for unique hand-made holiday gifts. "People appreciate when you go out of your way to make something personalized," says Mr. Graham. "It becomes a very special and traditional gift."
 For example, an assortment of holiday confections -- toffees, red and green jelly beans, and chocolate Santas, to name a few -- can be assembled with ribbons and bows into a colorful and attractive gift basket. Keep it simple for your co-workers, the babysitter, and the newspaper delivery boy. Spruce it up with a pair of theater tickets nestled inside for Mom or your favorite aunt. When the candy's gone, a practical basket remains.
 Even ordinary household gifts become eye-catching and heart-winning with confections. A water pitcher filled to the brim with clear peppermint candies, red and green lollipops "growing" amidst the leaves of a potted plant, a favorite book wrapped with red licorice strings and a candy cane -- you're limited only by your imagination.
 And, of course, confections make the perfect stocking stuffer for the kids. "Perhaps candy has become a popular holiday tradition for one reason," said Mr. Graham. "It never fails to elicit a smile."
 For those who may be interested in the nutritional value of assorted confections, the NCA offers a free brochure. Just send a self-addressed stamped envelope to "The Sweet Truth About Confectionery," 708 Third Ave., New York, NY 10017.
 -0- 11/13/92
 /CONTACT: Greg Tarmin of the National Confectioners Association, 212-951-5492/ CO: National Confectioners Association ST: New York IN: FOD SU:


GK-OS -- NYFNS1 -- 0488 11/13/92 07:31 EST
COPYRIGHT 1992 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Nov 13, 1992
Words:1059
Previous Article:FORD CEO VISITS ATLANTA SUPPLIER, STUDENTS AND NEWS MEDIA NOV. 16
Next Article:REALITY TECHNOLOGIES ANNOUNCES NEW OWNERSHIP, RECEIVES FUNDING FROM VENROCK ASSOCIATES
Topics:


Related Articles
Application of glucose syrups and derivatives in confectionery.
CONFECTIONERY GIFT-GIVING TO REACH RECORD HIGH THIS EASTER
MOTHER'S DAY 'SWEET SURPRISES'
CONFECTIONERY TO TOP GIFT-GIVING LIST THIS VALENTINE'S DAY; NEARLY TWO-THIRDS OF AMERICANS WILL GIVE SWEET TOKENS OF AFFECTION
IT'S LIKE 8,000 BIG KIDS IN A CANDY STORE; 34TH NATIONAL WINTER CANDY EXPOSITION SWEETENS THE CITY OF ANGELES
Chocolate and confectionery.
Chocolate and confectionery.
Chocolate and confectionery.
ALL CANDY EXPO(R) Forecasts New Candy Trends.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2017 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters