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1950s medical office building transformed.

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The Southdale Medical Building's healthcare facility in Edina, MN, has been transformed from a 1950s medical office building into an expanded, modern medical facility. Softening the sharp, sterile edges of the 6-story building, Minneapolis-based KKE gave the building an inviting curtainwall entry and a winged roof that enhance the visibility of the 26,000-square-foot, 2-story addition.

Built on a tight schedule, the medical center's main facade is clad in Minnesota limestone. Composite aluminum panels, tinted vision glass, and matching spandrel glass complete the exterior. A substantial roof overhang and supporting structure shade the west-facing glass from afternoon sun, and the materials were selected for long-term sustainability. Inside, a comfortable lobby is the inviting focal point of the multi-phase structure.

Challenges faced during construction included minimizing disruption to existing medical clinics, some of which were extremely sensitive to noise and vibration. According to Todd Young, principal and designer at KKE, "Issues, such as structural attachment of the addition to the existing building, needed special attention, as did exiting and life safety for non-ambulatory patients during construction. An extraordinary level of planning, in consultation with building officials and medical professionals, was required and achieved."

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Title Annotation:NEWSWORTHY
Author:Aker, Jenna M.
Publication:Buildings
Date:Feb 1, 2009
Words:194
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