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184 mm of sea level rise predicted in next 100 years.

Byline: ANI

Washington, Feb 26 (ANI): It has been suggested in a new study that at least 184 mm (7.2 inches) of sea level rise will occur in the next 100 years through melting of the world's mountain glaciers and ice caps, even if climate does not continue to warm.

Glaciers and ice caps can be split into regions where snow is accumulated and regions where snow and ice melt. If more snow accumulates than melts, the glacier will advance and grow larger.

Currently, accumulation areas for mountain glaciers are very small. Melting rates are surpassing accumulation rates, leading to glacier thinning and retreat.

By analyzing mass balance data from 86 mountain glaciers and ice caps from around the world, David B. Bahr from the Department of Physics and Computational Sciences, Regis University, US, found that given current accumulation areas and climate regimes, glaciers will lose about 27 percent of their volume before attaining equilibrium, a state where accumulation equals loss.

As a result, at least 184 mm (7.2 inches) of sea level rise will occur in the next 100 years through melting of the world's mountain glaciers and ice caps even if climate does not continue to warm.

However, if the climate continues to warm along current trends, at least 373 mm (14.6 inches) of sea level rise over the same period is expected as glaciers and ice caps lose at least 55 percent of their volume. (ANI)

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Publication:Asian News International
Date:Feb 26, 2009
Words:259
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