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100 most influential people in finance.

Tough times can be a proving ground, and the common thread that runs through this year's list is the extraordinary effort made by many of these finance executives, regulators and elected officials to get businesses or the broader economy back on track in the wake of the financial crisis. Whether the recovery is already under way, is sustainable, will falter in some parts of the world is still uncertain. But without a doubt, the financial crisis revealed just how close the world's economic ties are and that there's no going back on going global. Guts, gumption and a global mind-set are the three main themes of Treasury & Risk's 100 most influential People in Finance, even as regulation and risk management loom large ahead.

THE FINANCIAL C-SUITE

LEWIS BOOTH, EVP AND CFO, FORD MOTOR

Booth's deft financial steering locked in liquidity, keeping Ford out of bankruptcy and away from government receivership at a time when peers GM and Chrysler were crushed in a multi-car pileup.

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RICHARD GALANTI, EVP, CFO AND DIRECTOR, COSTCO WHOLESALE

An investment banker before he joined the chain of wholesale clubs, Galanti has helped guide Costco through a tough consumer market and get ahead of worker-related issues in California.

MARTINA HUND-MEJEAN, CFO, MASTERCARD WORLDWIDE

As the recession cut into the card company's revenues, Hund-Mejean led the work of trimming expenses, an effort that was so successful MasterCard managed to boost its operating margin in 2009.

PETER KELLOGG, EVP AND CFO, MERCK

Drawing on M&A skills that he honed at Biogen, Kellogg pulled off a $41 billion mega-merger with Schering-Plough in a year when M&A activity was scarce. The challenge now: finding effi ciencies without cutting into scientific research.

KURT KUEHN, SVP AND CFO, UNITED PARCEL SERVICE

Kuehn used the recession as an opportunity to make structural changes, including cost-cutting measures that saved UPS an estimated $1.4 billion during 2009.

CHRISTOPHER LIDDELL, VICE CHAIRMAN AND CFO, GENERAL MOTORS

Former finance chief at Microsoft and International Paper, Liddell brings a wealth of experience to bear on reviving the fallen auto giant, which aims to do an IPO once it's back on its feet.

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DONALD LOFE JR., EVP, CFO AND CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER, PMI GROUP

Lofe led efforts to stabilize and recapitalize the private mortgage insurer, including the sale of the international operations and several restructurings of the revolving credit facility.

BRIAN MACDONALD, SVP AND CFO, SUNOCO

Plucked from Dell, where he was CFO at the commercial business unit, MacDonald is tasked with cutting costs and improving returns at the oil refiner, which is seeking to expand.

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CHARLES MCLANE, EVP AND CFO, ALCOA

McLane led Alcoa's Cash Sustainability Program, focusing on seven categories--procurement savings, overhead reductions, capex cuts, working capital initiatives, disposing assets, dividend cuts and equity-linked financing--to shore up the balance sheet and restore liquidity.

TIMOTHY MCLEVISH, EVP AND CFO, KRAFT FOODS

Since arriving at Kraft, McLevish has completely restructured the finance function and in the aftermath of Kraft's hostile takeover of Cadbury, he needs to come up with the promised cost savings.

CHARLES NOSKI, EVP AND CFO, BANK OF AMERICA

Armed with a background in such decidedly non-Wall Street sectors as defense, telecom and technology, turnaround specialist Noski brings the perspective of Main Street back to B of A.

PATRICK PICHETTE, SVP AND CFO, GOOGLE

Rapid growth and great ambition could be the biggest challenges facing Pichette at Google, where first-quarter sales rose 23% year-over-year. Pichette's Bell Canada background may come in handy as the Android, Google's smart phone, goes app-to-app with the iPhone.

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RUTH PORAT, EVP AND CFO, MORGAN STANLEY

After years as an investment banker at Morgan Stanley, Porat, named finance chief at the start of this year, is expected to be one of the key people determining how to position the bank for the future.

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MARY ANN SIGLER, PARTNER AND CFO, PLATINUM EQUITY

While the recession has quashed a fair amount of deal making, the steady pace of acquisitions at Platinum, a Beverly Hills, Calif.-based private equity firm, keeps Sigler busy assessing potential deals.

DAVID TEHLE, EVP AND CFO, DOLLAR GENERAL

Shoppers watching their pennies have been a big plus for Dollar General, translating into a 12.8% sales increase in 2009 and a tripling of net income. Managing growth will be key for Tehle and Dollar.

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BRUCE VAN SAUN, GROUP FINANCE DIRECTOR, ROYAL BANK OF SCOTLAND

Van Saun, formerly CFO at Bank of New York Mellon, is expected to play a major role in the bank's restructuring and resuscitation, and brings strong deal-making credentials to that task.

ANDREW WARREN, EVP AND CFO, LIZ CLAIBORNE

A veteran of the vaunted managerial team at General Electric, where he headed the audit staff before joining Liz Claiborne in 2007, Warren helped lead his new employer through a successful turnaround.

WILLIAM WHEELER, EVP AND CFO, METLIFE

MetLife emerged from the downturn even stronger than it was going into it thanks to Wheeler's financial savvy. He was a key architect of the insurer's $15.5 billion acquisition of AIG's subsidiary, Alico.

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FINANCE PROS

ERIC ABOAF, TREASURER, CITIGROUP AND CITIBANK

Since taking over as treasurer in 2009, Aboaf has improved Citi's liquidity by lessening its reliance on wholesale funding, paying down short-term borrowings of almost $40 billion and expanding its liquidity buffer by more than $100 billion.

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ALAIN AKSIL, SENIOR MANAGER, CREDIT AND RISK, GLS FRANCE

At GLS France, a parcel delivery service, Aksil and his accounts receivable team used automation to cut the amount of time it takes GLS to collect payments, which bolstered the company's cash flow and reduced losses related to bad debt.

BOB ARMIAK, SVP AND TREASURER, ALLIANCE DATA

When the credit crunch disrupted the asset-backed securities market, a major funding source for Alliance, Armiak kept liquidity flowing by managing to issue $1.8 billion of debt.

AL BARBIERI, SVP, CAPITAL MARKET OPERATIONS, FANNIE MAE

As the mortgage giant struggles to find its footing in the wake of the housing crisis, Barbieri emphasizes the appropriate use of technology and process optimization for capital markets.

DAVID DOHNALEK, VP OF FINANCE AND TREASURER, BOEING

Dohnalek used his background in IR, financial planning and analysis to bolster Boeing's liquidity position so it can absorb negative operating cash flow as its airline customers face tough times.

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DARSH JOHAL, HEAD OF GLOBAL CASH MANAGEMENT, SHELL

Johal led the drive to streamline cash operations for Shell, and his model for centralized account management attracted industry attention and made him influential in the development of SWIFT's program for electronic bank account management (eBam).

MICHAEL LUKAS, VP OF FINANCE, QUEST DIAGNOSTICS

After 17 years at General Motors, where his positions included assistant treasurer, Lukas faces the challenge of helping the medical testing company adapt to changes generated by healthcare reform.

TIMOTHY MCDANNOLD, VP AND TREASURER, DIEBOLD

A resourceful, decorated leader in team-building, McDannold brings unconventional organization, motivation, recruitment and training to a mid-cap company that has stretched the definition of treasury by expanding its reach and interaction with business units.

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RUSSELL PAQUETTE, CORPORATE TREASURER AND DIRECTOR OF RISK MANAGEMENT, REI

As Paquette steered REI through the drop in recreational spending, he also emerged as an industry leader, tutoring legislative staffs in Washington for AFP's government relations committee.

ROBERT PEDERSEN, VP AND TREASURER, U.S. POSTAL SERVICE

At the struggling Postal Service, Pedersen launched an award-winning cash consolidation project that saved $3 million in bank fees and slashed staffing for account analysis review from 80 to two, and turned tasks that took 90 people 90 days into something three could do in three days.

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SHARON PETREY, ASSISTANT TREASURER, COCA-COLA ENTERPRISES

Petrey has been involved in centralizing the bottler's European treasury operations and is now working on the divestiture of its North American operations. She's also active in payment industry groups.

MIKE RICHARD, SVP AND TREASURER, MCDONALD'S

While others sought shelter from the crisis, Richard raised $4.1 billion in term funding, shrewdly exploiting global demand, and used the company's high debt ratings to help franchisees get financing.

WEI SHI, VP, TREASURY AND FINANCIAL PLANNING AND ANALYSIS, TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES

Before the recalls, Shi capitalized on Toyota's relative strength to keep funding aggressively across the debt markets at pre-crisis rates. TFS used that liquidity to finance its growing sales at a time when bank auto lending was drying up.

DENNIS SWEENEY, DEPUTY TREASURER, GENERAL ELECTRIC

Sweeney's efforts to advance such innovations as electronic bank account management, corporate adoption of SWIFT and the TWIST BSB standard benefit not only GE, but all treasuries.

RALPH THAN, VP AND TREASURER, DANA HOLDING CORP.

When the crisis hit, Than grabbed $600 million of liquidity by selling shares, pooling European cash and cutting dividends and cash collateral, then bought $125 million in Dana debt at sub-par prices.

THOMAS TIMKO, VP, CORPORATE CONTROLLER AND CHIEF ACCOUNTING OFFICER, APPLIED MATERIALS

In March, Timko joined Applied Materials from Delphi, where he reorganized the auto supplier's global controllership structure and dealt with financial reporting problems.

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RISK ATTENDANTS

STEVE DREYER, MANAGING DIRECTOR, STANDARD & POOR'S

As head of S&P's effort to incorporate enterprise risk management into its credit assessments, Dreyer is focusing the attention of senior executives and boards on their companies' ERM programs.

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TERRY FLEMING, PRESIDENT, RISK AND INSURANCE MANAGEMENT SOCIETY; DIRECTOR,RISK MANAGEMENT DIVISION, MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MD.

Under Fleming, RIMS is stepping up the battle to prohibit all contingent commissions, promote full transparency of all forms of compensation and establish a federal office of insurance, as well as working to expand membership internationally as the group marks its 60th anniversary.

DAVID FOX, DIRECTOR OF RISK MANAGEMENT, KBR

Tasked with risk management, insurance and credit, Fox, who began his career as a financial analyst, implemented insurance risk mitigation arrangements for several multi-billion-dollar projects and restructured multinational liability and property insurance programs involving six acquisitions.

JACOB ROSENGARTEN, EVP AND CHIEF ENTERPRISE RISK OFFICER, XL CAPITAL

Rosengarten helped guide the insurer's 2009 rebound from huge losses the year before. A former managing director of risk management and analytics at Goldman Sachs Asset Management, he has been enhancing XL's methods of identifying, measuring, aggregating and reporting risk information.

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JOSEPH STEAKLEY, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, INTERNAL AUDIT SERVICES, HOSPITAL CORP. OF AMERICA

As head of its enterprise risk office, Steakley has engaged HCA and its hundreds of hospitals in a robust ERM process involving board and senior managers for nine years, well before it became the rage.

JIM TRAUT, DIRECTOR, ENTERPRISE REPUTATION AND RISK MANAGEMENT, H.J. HEINZ

Traut took charge of risk management at Heinz in 2006 and has directed the development and implementation of the company's global ERM operation, which is strongly linked to strategy

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SUSAN WILSON, SVP, RISK AND COMPLIANCE SERVICES, REYNOLDS AMERICAN

With a background in auditing and accounting, for the past six years Wilson has spearheaded the development of a comprehensive ERM program for Reynolds and its operating companies.

RULEMAKERS & LOBBYISTS

PHIL ANGELIDES, CHAIRMAN, FINANCIAL CRISIS INQUIRY COMMISSION

This former California state treasurer, who warned early on of the Golden State's excesses, is tasked with getting to the bottom of the financial crisis, which at times seems bottomless.

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SHEILA BAIR, CHAIRMAN, FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORP.

Under Bair, the FDIC is working with banks to speed the rebuilding of its fund and explore ways to tie the premiums banks pay for deposit insurance to the riskiness of their business strategy.

BEN BERNANKE, CHAIRMAN, FEDERAL RESERVE BOARD

The Fed chief put his Great Depression expertise to good use during the downturn, but now new problems loom, particularly trouble involving the debt-ridden euro zone states.

E. GERALD CORRIGAN, MANAGING DIRECTOR, GOLDMAN SACHS

A powerful figure within the Group of 30, Corrigan can be expected to use his influence to raise awareness of the intended--and unintended--consequences to capital markets that may arise from the overzealous regulatory efforts coming out of the U.S. and Europe.

KENNETH FEINBERG, SPECIAL MASTER FOR TARP EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION, U.S. TREASURY

The bete noire of Wall Street bankers, as TARP pay czar, Feinberg took such steps as reviewing the compensation of the top 25 executives at banks that received TARP funds.

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RICHARD FERLAUTO, DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF POLICY, OFFICE OF INVESTOR EDUCATION AND ADVOCACY, U.S. SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

At his previous job heading corporate governance programs for the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, Ferlauto promoted shareholder activism. That background serves him well in his current role, part of the SEC's new focus on protecting individual investors' interests.

TIMOTHY GEITHNER, SECRETARY, U.S. TREASURY

Geithner has proven sufficiently thick-skinned to withstand criticism and abuse from 100 senators and 432 congressmen, as well as countless "experts." His quiet determination will be further tested as he tries to sell Europe on the U.S. vision for financial reform and regulation.

ROBERT HERZ, CHAIRMAN, FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD

With a year to go before the U.S. embraces financial convergence, Herz will need all his wits to deal with the IASB and soothe the nerves of finance departments wary about IFRS standards.

ROBERT KELLY, CHAIRMAN AND CEO, BNY MELLON

A familiar Capitol Hill presence as chairman of the Financial Services Forum, Kelly shaped BNY Mellon into a stabilizing force as it served as TARP administrator, was among the first to repay its TARP loan, and began 2010 as the only U.S. bank rated triple-A by Moody's.

JAMES KROEKER, CHIEF ACCOUNTANT, U.S. SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Kroeker's steady-as-she-goes attitude could be the right Rx as FASB and the IASB work toward a single set of financial standards. His focus on what is doable (i.e., revenue recognition and financial instruments), rather than an all-or-nothing approach, is just what the doctor ordered.

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ART MURTON, DIRECTOR, DIVISION OF INSURANCE AND RESEARCH, FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORP.

Murton kept banks liquid with the Temporary Liquidity Guarantee Program, and his plan to get banks to prepay three years of insurance premiums helped the FDIC avoid borrowing from Treasury.

PATRICK PARKINSON, DIRECTOR, DIVISION OF BANKING SUPERVISION AND REGULATION, FEDERAL RESERVE

While on loan to the U.S. Treasury, Fed economist Parkinson played a key role in drafting a white paper on regulatory reform that became a blueprint for subsequent legislation and agency initiatives. Now he's bringing economic sophistication to revamping the Fed's regulation of large banks.

MARY SCHAPIRO, CHAIRMAN, U.S. SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Although news headlines may focus on the more sensational, like financial fraud in the CDO market, Schapiro's real challenge and lasting legacy may be bringing about reform in such crucial areas as executive compensation, disclosure, risk management and board oversight.

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PAUL VOLCKER, CHAIRMAN, WHITE HOUSE ECONOMIC RECOVERY ADVISORY BOARD

When he tamed inflation in the 1980s, Volcker secured his place in U.S. economic history. Now he's writing another chapter in an illustrious career by pounding at the U.S. deficit and appetite for debt.

GOVERNMENT AGENTS

BARACK OBAMA, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Fresh from his victory in passing healthcare reform, Obama must now try to pass regulations that limit the excesses of banks without crippling them. Long term, however, the key to success may lie in a very different campaign: winning the 2010 congressional midterm elections.

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U.S. SEN. CHRISTOPHER DODD (D-CONN.), CHAIRMAN, SENATE BANKING COMMITTEE

Dodd must shape legislation that regulates derivatives, reduces financial institution leverage and lets government seize collapsing financial institutions whether or not they're a bank.

U.S. REP. BARNEY FRANK (D-MASS.), CHAIRMAN, HOUSE FINANCIAL SERVICES COMMITTEE

Perhaps the single most influential leader in the House, Frank and his committee oversee every aspect of the country's banking, insurance, real estate, public and assisted housing and securities--you name it, Financial Services is in it. Left-of-center Frank vows the era of lax regulation is over.

U.S. SEN. BLANCHE LINCOLN (D-ARK.), CHAIRMAN, SENATE AGRICULTURE COMMITTEE

Lincoln's reform bill could force banks to give up their derivatives trading business and has the financial industry up in arms.

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BILL LOCKYER, TREASURER, STATE OF CALIFORNIA

This spring, Lockyer sent a letter to big Wall Street banks asking if they were selling credit default swaps to bet against California's creditworthiness. The bigger question he might have raised: who's betting for the state's credit rating, given its $20 billion deficit in 2010.

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U.S. REP. EARL POMEROY (D-N.D.)

In a year dominated by healthcare reform, Pomeroy introduced legislation to help U.S. businesses choking under pension funding requirements by giving them breathing room to meet their obligations.

TECHNOCRATS

KEN DUMMITT, PRESIDENT, SUNGARD AVANTGARD

Leveraging tech giant SunGard's big investment in cloud computing, Dummitt is pushing the treasury workstation unit to deliver new services that help companies connect disparate systems, increase transparency and improve liquidity management enterprise-wide.

KEVIN GRANT, CEO, IT2 TREASURY SOLUTIONS

Grant has turned the former SimCorp unit into a competitor of the big treasury solutions providers by focusing on innovation and creating a user-pleasing interface.

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WOLFGANG KOESTER, CEO, FIREAPPS

Having warned in February that the euro could break apart, Koester is helping to educate multinationals about the impact of foreign exchange on corporate value and led the rollout of a new and improved version of FiREapps' FX exposure management software this year.

LUC MEURANT, HEAD OF BANKING, SUPPLY CHAIN AND CORPORATE MARKETS, SWIFT

Meurant heads the team that developed SWIFT's new electronic bank account management solution (eBam), which is expected to simplify and speed treasurers' transactions with their banking partners.

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LARRY NG, MANAGING DIRECTOR, CORPORATE DEVELOPMENT, WALL STREET SYSTEMS

Ng is the architect driving Wall Street Systems' expansion, which includes a definitive move into the eBam space with the acquisition of Speranza Systems and a rollout of mobile treasury applications.

JIRO OKOCHI, CEO, REVAL

Okochi led an effort to exempt corporate end users from stringent over-the-counter derivatives regulation, while overseeing Reval's acquisition and integration of risk management platform FXpress.

GLEN SOLIMINE, HEAD OF WALLSTREET TREASURY, WALL STREET SYSTEMS

One of the first visionaries to see the power of eBam, Solimine founded Speranza Systems, partnered with Citigroup and Shell on a groundbreaking pilot and worked with SWIFT to make eBam an industry standard. He's now part of Wall Street Systems.

PEGGY STEWART, EVP AND COO, AON BROKING EXCELLENCE WORLDWIDE

Stewart directed the team implementing the insurance brokerage's proprietary Web-based Global Risk Insight Platform (GRIP), which leverages the more than $54 billion of commercial coverage that Aon places to provide real-time trade information broken down by line, industry and geography.

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BANKS

ANNE BODEN, HEAD OF GLOBAL TRANSACTION BANKING, EMEA, ROYAL BANK OF SCOTLAND

As head of RBS's cash, liquidity and trade business across 24 countries, Boden knows what doing business in Europe entails. She aims to bring an awareness of treasury into the board room, ensuring that corporate governance is top of the agenda with many European treasurers.

DAVID CONROY, AMERICAS HEAD OF TRADE FINANCE AND CASH MANAGEMENT CORPORATES, GLOBAL TRANSACTION BANKING, DEUTSCHE BANK

Conroy has driven a resurgence in growth for the bank's trade and cash management franchise in the Americas, marked by product innovation and technology enhancements in financial supply chain management and global payments, along with regional expansion in Brazil.

PAUL DONOFRIO, PRESIDENT, GLOBAL CORPORATE BANKING, BANK OF AMERICA MERRILL LYNCH

Donofrio leads B of A's treasury products and services efforts, ranging from cash management to merchant services. He's based in London, a sign of the bank's global aspirations after its Merrill deal.

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STEVE EVERETT, SVP AND HEAD OF BALANCE SHEET AND OPERATING ASSETS, NORTHERN TRUST

Everett leads a global team focused on balance-sheet cash management in both corporate and not-for-profit segments, the fastest growing area of the asset management business. He is involved in building third-party, global distribution channels for the bank, including online trading systems.

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MICHAEL GALLAGHER, EVP, GLOBAL HEAD OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS, PAYMENTS AND CLEARING, HEAD OF PAYMENTS AND CASH MANAGEMENT NORTH AMERICA, HSBC BANK USA

A transaction banking veteran of more than 25 years, Gallagher directs HSBC's payments and cash management business in North America and all its currency clearing activities for financial institutions worldwide.

HEIDI MILLER, CEO, TREASURY AND SECURITIES SERVICES, JP MORGAN CHASE

Recognized for her consistent ability to create bottom line growth despite the economy, Miller's keen insights into the significant challenges clients face in today's turbulent marketplace and her focused leadership have made TSS one of the most profitable business units for JP Morgan and a leading global custodian.

JULIE MONACO, MANAGING DIRECTOR AND HEAD OF GLOBAL TRANSACTION SERVICES, NORTH AMERICA, CITIGROUP

Under Monaco's watch, GTS North America has become a top provider to U.S. federal, state and local governments, implementing the Defense Department's card program and California's electronic tax collection platform, the Treasury Department's liquidity program for auto industry suppliers, and handling transactions in 180 countries in 90 currencies for the Fed.

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KAREN PEETZ, SENIOR EVP, CEO OF FINANCIAL MARKETS AND TREASURY SERVICES, BNY MELLON

On the bank's executive committee and leading a business line that contributes a third of total revenue, Peetz is an architect of innovation as a global competitive strategy and a champion of diversity.

DIANE QUINN, MANAGING DIRECTOR AND GLOBAL CORPORATE SEGMENT EXECUTIVE, J.P. MORGAN TREASURY SERVICES

Acknowledged by her peers as a brilliant presenter who influences other thought leaders, Quinn recently returned to J.P. Morgan to drive efforts to expand international capabilities for corporates.

LISA ROBINSON, SVP OF RISK MANAGEMENT, COMPLIANCE AND ENTERPRISE WEB GOVERNANCE, WELLS FARGO

Amid one of the biggest mergers ever between Wells and Wachovia, Robinson leads a team on another new frontier and is dedicated to securing customer information in an increasingly mobile, social and integrated world.

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GLOBAL GURUS

HENRIQUE MEIRELLES, PRESIDENT, BANCO CENTRAL DO BRASIL

In fast-growing Brazil, worries center on price pressures, and Meirelles, president of Brazil's central bank, hiked a key rate by 75 basis points in April as part of his promise to keep inflation under control.

ANGELA MERKEL, CHANCELLOR, GERMANY

The distaste among German voters for bailing out Greece left Merkel on the sidelines during the recent European rescue operation, but the episode still cost her coalition votes in the German elections.

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NICOLAS SARKOZY, PRESIDENT, FRANCE

The French president prevailed in the European debt crisis, pushing through the bailout for Greece and the fund to provide support for other EU members despite German objections.

DOMINIQUE STRAUSS-KAHN, MANAGING DIRECTOR, INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND

Strauss-Kahn, a French economist and politician, played a key role in brokering Europe's plan for a bailout package of close to $1 trillion to deal with the troubles of Greece and other EU members.

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JEAN-CLAUDE TRICHET, PRESIDENT, EUROPEAN CENTRAL BANK

Trichet's eight-year term as head of the ECB ends next year, and the European debt crisis has ensured that he's going out with a bang. Just recently the ECB bent its rules to accept debt from battered Greece.

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ZHOU XIAOCHUAN, GOVERNOR, PEOPLE'S BANK OF CHINA

China's central bank is sitting on roughly $750 billion of U.S. Treasury securities. So when its governor suggests the world needs another reserve currency or starts rearranging the maturity of his Treasury holdings, people pay attention.

HEAVY HITTERS

MOHAMED EL-ERIAN, CEO AND CO-CHIEF INVESTMENT OFFICER, PACIFIC INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT CO.

From his bully pulpit at bond powerhouse Pimco, El-Erian has been sounding the alarm about the potential global havoc the Greek debt crisis may wreak.

PAUL KRUGMAN, PROFESSOR OF ECONOMICS AND INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS, PRINCETON UNIVERSITY

A Nobel Prize-winning economist and New York Times op-ed columnist, Krugman's well-reasoned defense of healthcare reform contributed to its eventual, if controversial, passage.

MICHAEL LEWIS, AUTHOR, THE BIG SHORT

Lewis explores the greed, excesses and delusions that led to the meltdown through the stories of four financial renegades who cashed in on their insight that the market had nowhere to go but down.

JIM OWENS, CHAIRMAN AND CEO, CATERPILLAR

Owens, a member of the President's Economic Recovery Advisory Board, has been vocal in expressing corporate America's concerns about proposed changes to corporate taxes.

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LESLIE RAHL, FOUNDER AND MANAGING PARTNER, CAPITAL MARKET RISK ADVISORS

Rahl, an expert in the use of derivatives and former co-head of Citibank's North American derivatives group, has been a pioneer in the use of risk unit allocation for fixed-income risk management.

NOURIEL ROUBINI, PROFESSOR OF ECONOMICS AND INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS, NEW YORK UNIVERSITY'S STERN SCHOOL OF BUSINESS

Having predicted in 2005 that a housing bubble would sink the economy, Roubini's forecasting acumen will face a test in coming months: He says the economy will "slow to a crawl" in late 2010.

MARK SMETANA, CFO, EBY-BROWN CO.

Smetana is a leader on policy issues related to tax and access to capital and heads Financial Executives International's Committee on Private Companies.

NASSIM TALEB, PROFESSOR OF RISK ENGINEERING, NEW YORK UNIVERSITY'S POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE

Coiner of the term "black swan," meaning a crisis that cannot be mathematically predicted, Taleb's theory has been illustrated most recently by a massive oil rig blowout in the Gulf of Mexico and a heart-stopping five-minute May stock market crash of 10%.

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MOVING TARGETS

ROBERT BENMOSCHE, PRESIDENT AND CEO, AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL GROUP

After threatening to quit three times, Benmosche stayed on at AIG and has kept the massively bailed out insurer afloat instead of letting it be broken up and sold off by federal regulators.

LLOYD BLANKFEIN, CHAIRMAN AND CEO, GOLDMAN SACHS

Profiting from the financial bailout, continuing to pay fat bonuses to traders and executives and now facing SEC fraud charges for allegedly selling clients products it was betting against, Blankfein's firm has come to symbolize what's wrong with Wall Street.

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DENISE NAPPIER, TREASURER, STATE OF CONNECTICUT

Nappier has placed her small state square in the midst of the campaign to reform executive pay, pressing the SEC to demand disclosure of fees paid to executive pay consultants, and filing proxies related to executive pay at 12 companies where state pension funds are a shareholder.

HASSO PLATTNER, CHAIRMAN, SAP

A co-founder of the business software company, Plattner is credited with engineering its pending $5.8 acquisition of Sybase, which will give SAP increasingly crucial mobile Internet capability and entree to China. It also picks up Sybase's Liquidity Management solution, aimed at big bank treasuries.

JOE PLUMERI, CHAIRMAN AND CEO, WILLIS GROUP

Plumeri has taken a stand against contingent commissions, not only supporting regulations to ban them and launching a public awareness campaign against them, but making his company the first to publicly disavow the practice.

JEFFERY SMISEK, CHAIRMAN, PRESIDENT AND CEO, CONTINENTAL AIRLINES

Blunt-spoken, fast-driving Smisek will become CEO of the world's biggest airline after engineering a merger with United Airlines. But he faces a challenge in dealing with United's feisty unions.

TIM SMITH, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, WALDEN ASSET MANAGEMENT

A long-time advocate of shareholder activism and corporate responsibility, the financial crisis saw Smith become a focal point for the movement to give shareholders a say on executive pay.

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Date:Jun 1, 2010
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