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/FIRST AND FINAL ADD -- NY013 -- IBM BACKGROUNDER/

 /FIRST AND FINAL ADD -- NY013 -- IBM BACKGROUNDER/
 IBM BLUEPRINT STRESSES APPLICATION FLEXIBILITY
 ACROSS DIVERSE NETWORK TYPES
 IBM's blueprint for networking, introduced with the March 25 Networking Systems announcement, is a guide designed to provide customers with an understanding of IBM's networking commitments. The blueprint puts forth a framework for integrating applications using different types of communications protocols into a single network. In this way customers can concentrate on productivity enhancing applications to strengthen their businesses' competitiveness without being constrained by networking issues.
 The blueprint also spans local area networks, or LANs, as well as larger wide area and global networks -- and so can affect networking decisions for the small, intermediate and large customer. And the blueprint supports all models of computing, including client/server, which promotes end user productivity through more flexible access to resources -- such as files, applications and printers -- distributed throughout the network.
 The blueprint highlights four growth areas for accomplishing this network integration.
 1. Multiprotocol Networking
 There are a wide variety of networking protocols in use today for sending and exchanging information throughout a network. Some examples are: Open Systems Interconnection (OSI), Transmission Control Protocol Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), Systems Network Architecture (SNA), Internet Packet Exchange (IPX), Xerox Services Internet Transport (XNS), AppleTalk and DECNET.
 In the past, separate networks were needed to support users of these different protocols. Today's multiprotocol routers allow the customer to build a single network that will support all of these protocols. Multiprotocol routers can be used in this way to integrate different types of local area networks with each other, or with wide area network types such as X.25 and Frame Relay.
 IBM's leadership in this area will come from its strengths in integrating SNA with other types of networking protocols.
 2. Subnetworking
 A subnetwork is a piece of a larger network -- for instance a series of Token-Ring local area networks connected by bridges is a subnetwork. Other subnetworks might include Ethernet LANs, or wide area networks using either X.25, frame relay or ISDN transmission technologies.
 While these technologies support current applications, growth in microprocessor-based workstation capabilities will place new demands on these networks. Dramatically improved technologies will be needed to support the growth of applications such as multimedia, voice and video, as well as visualization applications for use in medicine, research, product simulation and design.
 In coming years, the growth of these applications will place a thousand-fold increase on network bandwidth demand. In addition, real time voice, video and visualization are all isochronous -- meaning precise in time -- and require precise transmission without disruption or delay.
 The IBM networking blueprint presents a plan to address the evolution from today's to tomorrow's applications in both LANs and wide area networks -- supporting today's data rates in megabits per second to the gigabit speeds required by more advanced applications.
 For local area networks, this means migration from Ethernet, Token Ring and Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) at speeds up to 100 megabits per second, to technologies such as Fiber Channel Standard at gigabit speeds. In wide area networks, this means evolving to fast packet and cell-based technologies that can also achieve gigabit speeds.
 3. Multivendor Application Support
 There are many application interfaces and services in use on various networking platforms today. Typically, these interfaces and services are only able to operate in a specific networking environment. The IBM networking blueprint contains a structure for extending the reach of many different types of applications throughout many networking environments -- so that end users can more freely access and share information.
 There are three main application services supporting diverse kinds of computing, including the client/server model. All three kinds of application services can provide support for application directories, application recovery and application security. The first is CONVERSATIONAL, such as used by Common Programming Interface for Communications, or CPI-C, and Transaction Processing, or TP, for Open Systems Interconnection, or OSI. Both CPI-C and TP applications first grew out of large and intermediate networks with a mainframe or minicomputer base and have evolved towards LANs. REMOTE PROCEDURE CALL, or RPC, is, by contrast, an application type more associated with LANs. Finally, MESSAGE QUEUEING is suited for business critical transaction processing applications, such as those used in banking and securities.
 The IBM networking blueprint will enable a choice of transport solutions so that any application can use any underlying transport. For instance, a CPI-C application could use the TCP/IP transport. This will be done through a networking function called Common Transport Semantics by which applications can access the various transport services of the network.
 4. Systems Management
 Also in the IBM networking blueprint are plans for systems and network management in both a distributed and centralized manner. IBM will provide comprehensive management capability encompassing all management disciplines, such as problem, configuration, change and performance.
 The management system will support multiprotocol and multivendor environments through industry standards. Chiefly, IBM will provide SNA management services, Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) and Common Management Information Protocol (CMIP). In addition, the network management system will be provided within IBM's SystemView framework.
 Finally, in line with the IBM networking blueprint, networking solutions will be published, available and implementable by other networking vendors -- in order to promote the flexible networking that customers require. In this way, customers will best be able to leverage their present and future investments in networking hardware and software.
 Today's Announcements.
 The March 25, 1992, networking announcements begin to address the IBM networking blueprint -- as can be seen in the following highlights:
 -- Today's VTAM/APPN and CPI-C announcements enhance a rich set of client/server alternatives for wide area networks as well as DOS and AIX (See Note) clients.
 -- Sockets support for APPN on VTAM (See Note) is an example of multivendor application support, as it enables socket applications that run on TCP/IP to run on both SNA and APPN.
 -- Licensing APPN network node will help to promote flexible networking, allowing customers to choose from multiple vendors.
 -- APPN support for the IBM 6611 Network Processor is key to multiprotocol networking.
 Future IBM networking announcements will be mapped against the blueprint.
 NOTE: Trademark or registered trademark of the International Business Machines Corporation.
 -0- 3/25/92 AA NY013
 /END FIRST AND FINAL ADD/
 (IBM) CO: International Business Machines Corp. ST: New York IN: CPR SU: PDT


SH -- NY013A -- 1417 03/25/92 09:58 EST
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Date:Mar 25, 1992
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