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'THE ULTRA 40 PERCENT CHALLENGE' ISSUES A CALL-TO-ACTION TO MAKE IT EASIER FOR CONSUMERS TO REDUCE, REUSE AND RECYCLE

 Procter & Gamble Offers New Products and Tips To Help Reduce
 America's Solid Waste Problem
 CINCINNATI, Feb. 23 /PRNewswire/ -- With Americans producing an average of 1,300 pounds of trash per person per year, "reduce, reuse and recycle" have become words to live by in the environmentally conscious 90s. Most experts agree that solving America's solid waste problem requires a cooperative effort between manufacturers and consumers.
 To help develop solutions to this problem, Procter & Gamble is introducing the next generation of laundry products -- its new line of Ultra concentrated liquid detergents and refills. This "new generation" of laundry products includes concentrated formulations that allow consumers to use less product and offers smaller, more convenient packaging than before. Also, the addition of refills enables consumers to reuse the original bottle, thereby reducing solid waste. The Ultra refill bottle has 40 percent less packaging than the new, comparable 50-ounce detergent bottle. In fact, the new Ultra detergent line was recently named by Advertising Age magazine as one of the top 10 products of 1992 because its downsized packaging gives added convenience to consumers while helping the environment at the same time.
 The Ultra 40 Percent Challenge
 In addition to introducing these new products, the Ultra brand of concentrated liquid detergents also is urging consumers to take action in the home to reduce their output of solid waste. They have named this call-to-action "The Ultra 40 Percent Challenge," in recognition of the 40 percent reduction in plastic packaging achieved by the new Ultra refill bottles.
 "The Ultra 40 Percent Challenge is our way of encouraging consumers to reduce, reuse and recycle by providing new products and easy guidelines for reducing solid waste in the laundry room and throughout the rest of the home," says Carol Berning, Ph.D., Associate Director of Consumer Research at Procter & Gamble.
 Ultra Compact Liquid Detergents and Refills Are The New Generation
 Of The Laundry Category
 The Ultra detergents are the first concentrated liquid detergents available nationally in the marketplace and include the Tide, Cheer, Era, Dash, Dreft and Ivory Snow brands. The introduction of a detergent refill to the line-up is the first of its kind in the laundry category. Refills are available for Tide, Tide Free, Tide with Bleach Alternative, Cheer with ColorGuard, Cheer Free, Era, Dash, Bold and Solo brands.
 The new Ultra packaging system is a small step towards solving America's solid waste problem and is a good example of how consumers and manufacturers can work together to reduce solid waste. This new packaging reinforces the government's recommendation to "reduce, reuse and recycle."
 New Concentrated Liquid Detergents Make Waste Reduction Easier
 It is estimated that together the original bottles and refills will use 5,000 tons of post-consumer recycled plastic, thereby reducing the solid waste stream and keeping these materials out of landfills. Both the original and refill bottles are made with post-consumer recycled plastic.
 The Ultra concentrated liquid detergents and refills were developed with both environmental and consumer needs in mind. As a result, these products make it easier to reduce solid waste in the laundry room and increase convenience at the same time.
 For example, the refill bottle uses 40 percent less plastic packaging than the new 50-ounce bottle. In addition, the new 50-ounce bottle uses 20 percent less packaging than the previous 64-ounce bottle, yet provides the same number of uses. The refill bottle is made with at least 50 percent post-consumer recycled plastic, while the original bottle is made with at least 25 percent post-consumer recycled plastic.
 In addition to helping solve America's solid waste problem, the improved packaging makes the products easier to carry, handle, use and store. The reduced and improved packaging also features a laundry detergent first -- a "view stripe" on the handle side of the bottle that allows consumers to see how much liquid detergent is left. This simple feature, which consumers have been asking for, alerts them to the need to purchase refills before running out of detergent.
 The Ultra 40 Percent Challenge -- Reducing Waste Throughout The Home
 Using Ultra liquid detergents and refills is one way consumers can reduce, reuse and recycle in the laundry room. Outside the laundry room and throughout the rest of the home, there are a myriad of ways consumers can cut down on waste.
 Here are just a few ideas from Dr. Berning:
 General
 -- Keep a diary for one week of what you throw away to evaluate what type of trash your household generates; this way you can identify which areas of your home are the biggest culprits and begin to cut down on solid waste output.
 -- Research where your local recycling facilities are and what capabilities they have so that your home recycling program is effective.
 -- Organize recycling at home to make it easy: keep old cardboard boxes to reuse as collection bins for aluminum cans, plastic, paper and glass recyclables, then just take the box to your local recycling facilities.
 In The Laundry Room
 -- Try to use products like Ultra Tide, Ultra Cheer or Ultra Downy that use recycled materials for packaging and provide refill systems to enable you to reduce solid waste.
 -- Instead of discarding hangers and plastic bags that come from the cleaners, try to return those materials so they can be used again.
 In The Kitchen
 -- Aluminum foil used to wrap sandwiches can be reused to line a broiler pan and can virtually eliminate the clean-up.
 -- Save aluminum pie-plates and the styrofoam trays used in packaging food to catch run-off water under houseplants.
 -- Reuse glass bottles and jars for storage of dry goods. Or, keep a glass bottle filled with drinking water in the refrigerator, it's more efficient than running the tap.
 -- Water plants with leftover water from boiled vegetables. Your plants will love the vitamins.
 -- When a sponge is too dirty and you need a new one to wash dishes, use the old sponge for the floor and get more use from it.
 -- Instead of throwing away old coffee grounds, place them on the soil around acid-loving plants such as azaleas, roses and rhododendrons.
 In the Living Room
 -- Give your old magazines to hospitals and rest homes if they're not recyclable in your area.
 -- Donate or sell your old books to a used bookstore.
 -- Old stockings can be stuffed into a weather proofing roll to put in front of a drafty door.
 In The Yard
 -- Reduce the amount of yard waste, such as grass clippings and leaves, that usually go to landfills, and instead use them to create a compost pile for richer soil.
 -- Reuse plastic milk jugs as scoops for soil, dog food or birdseed.
 -- Instead of throwing away weeds and plants after you've pulled them from your garden, use them as compost to enrich the surrounding soil.
 Composting
 Composting is a natural process in which plant and other organic wastes are broken down biologically to produce a nutrient-rich material.
 Find a level, well drained place in your yard. A compost pile must be about three feet across and about three feet high to be effective, and not more than five feet high because then it gets too heavy and too dense for oxygen circulation.
 Here are some easy tips to create a compost system of your own at home:
 -- Get information about composting materials in your area by contacting your county Cooperative Extension agent or watch local gardening newspaper columns.
 -- If you put food wastes, paper, yard wastes, and grass clippings into a compost heap to be used as mulch and organic fertilizer in your yard, about 55 percent of your trash output will be reduced, and you will also have free and safe soil enrichment.
 -- Chopping and shredding large items before adding them to your compost pile will help speed the decomposition process.
 -- An advantage of composting is that you won't have to purchase soil nutrients from the nursery and your garden fruits and vegetables will be much healthier.
 -0- 2/23/93
 /CONTACT: Lynn Hailey of Procter & Gamble, 513-983-1975, or Lisa Kovitz of Hill and Knowlton, Inc., 212-697-5600, for Procter & Gamble/


CO: Procter & Gamble ST: Ohio IN: HOU SU:

TS -- NY019 -- 9285 02/23/93 09:22 EST
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No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1993 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

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Date:Feb 23, 1993
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