Printer Friendly

'SEWING AT HOME MAKES A COMEBACK'

 'SEWING AT HOME MAKES A COMEBACK'
 RADNOR, Pa., Feb. 19 /PRNewswire/ -- Looking for a hobby that can


add creativity, fun, color and adventure to your life without your leaving the house? And one that can save you money, to boot? Then perhaps you should try one of America's fastest-growing at-home hobbies -- sewing.
 Yes, sewing. It may have been the bane of your grandmother, or your mother, but the ancient art of sewing is making a comeback. "Home sewers are the equivalent of the weekend woodworker," notes Robbie Fanning, author and consultant for Chilton Book Company. "And they're not doing it to make money. They sew for the pleasure of it, to make something beautiful. They enjoy the process as much as the end products of what they are making."
 Once in a league with scrubbing floors, sewing is becoming a leisure-time activity of choice for a growing number of American women. Some estimates place the current number between 25 million and 30 million. The growing interest helped to make fabric retailing a leading U.S. growth industry in 1991, according to the Fortune Magazine Investor's Guide.
 Most home sewers are college-educated working women who are taking up the ancient art for fun and relaxation. Among their numbers are television actress Daphne Maxwell Reid, former "Today" show anchor Deborah Norville, and Olympic gold medalist Florence Griffith Joyner.
 A major reason for sewing's resurgence in the home is computerized machines, improved fabric cutting tools and other technological advances that have all but eliminated the time and tedium of hand-sewing button holes, hems and seams. For instance, specialized sewing machines (sergers) which finish edges and perform decorative sewing techniques were once found only in the garment industry; today this machine has become affordable for home use. These advances have made it possible for recreational sewers to create professionally finished garments.
 "Technology has made sewing fun," notes Fanning. "For instance, making button holes used to be horrible. Now all you have to do is push a button on a computerized machine."
 Three recent Chilton books are designed to help the home sewer. "Innovative Sewing" is a guide to making sewing "easier, faster and simpler." For those who don't have time to sew from scratch, there's a chapter on altering ready-to-wear clothes. "Innovative Serging" covers state-of-the-art techniques for tailoring and adding decorative stitches. "Color in Fashion" explains to readers how to coordinate fashion colors.
 Chilton books are available in bookstores and craft and sewing stores across the country.
 /delval/
 -0- 2/19/92
 /CONTACT: Nancy Ellis of Chilton Book Company, 215-964-4839/ CO: Chilton Book Company ST: Pennsylvania IN: TEX SU:


SM -- NYFFNS3 -- 0237 02/19/92 07:23 EST
COPYRIGHT 1992 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Feb 19, 1992
Words:444
Previous Article:THE SOFTWARE TOOLWORKS AND LUCASFILM GAMES ANNOUNCE CD-ROM STRATEGIC MARKETING ALLIANCE
Next Article:SMALL SOFTWARE FIRM MAKES BIG FINALIST IN SPA AWARDS; MYSOFTWARE'S MYADVANCEDMAILLIST FINALIST IN 1991 EXCELLENCE IN SOFTWARE AWARDS
Topics:


Related Articles
SEWING AND MOTHERHOOD: WE'VE COME A LONG WAY, BABY
SINGER SEWING COMPANY ANNOUNCES NEW SEWING SERIES ON NOSTALGIA NETWORK
NEW 'READER'S DIGEST COMPLETE GUIDE TO SEWING' BUTTONS UP TODAY'S SEWING NEEDS
Football - FIFA WORLD CUP QUALIFYING: Togo reach finals for the first time.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters