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'Adorable' raccoon cousin named world's newest mammal.

Washington, August 16 ( ANI ): Olinguito, which looks like a cross between house cat and a teddy bear, is the latest scientifically documented member of the family Procyonidae, which it shares with raccoons, coatis, kinkajous and olingos.

Observed in the wild, tucked away in museum collections, and even exhibited in zoos around the world; olinguito (oh-lin-GHEE-toe) has been a victim of mistaken identity for more than 100 years.

A team of Smithsonian scientists, however, uncovered overlooked museum specimens of this remarkable animal, which took them on a journey from museum cabinets in Chicago to cloud forests in South America to genetics labs in Washington, D.C.

And their labour's bore fruit after the olinguito (Bassaricyon neblina); became the first carnivore species to be discovered in the Western Hemisphere in 35 years.

The 2-pound olinguito, with its large eyes and woolly orange-brown fur, is native to the cloud forests of Colombia and Ecuador, as its scientific name, "neblina" (Spanish for "fog"), hints.

In addition to being the latest described member of its family, another distinction the olinguito holds is that it is the newest species in the order Carnivora; an incredibly rare discovery in the 21st century.

Kristofer Helgen, curator of mammals at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History and leader of the team reporting the new discovery, said that the discovery of the olinguito shows us that the world is not yet completely explored, its most basic secrets not yet revealed.

The first clue of the discovery came to Helgen from the olinguito's teeth and skull, which were smaller and differently shaped than those of olingos.

Examining museum skins revealed that this new species was also smaller overall with a longer and denser coat; field records showed that it occurred in a unique area of the northern Andes Mountains at 5,000 to 9,000 feet above sea level, elevations much higher than the known species of olingo.

This information, however, was coming from overlooked olinguito specimens collected in the early 20th century. The question Helgen and his team wanted to answer next was: Does the olinguito still exist in the wild?

The team had a lucky break that started with a camcorder video. With confirmation of the olinguito's existence via a few seconds of grainy video shot by their colleague Miguel Pinto, a zoologist in Ecuador, Helgen and Kays set off on a three-week expedition to find the animal themselves. Working with Pinto, they found olinguitos in a forest on the western slopes of the Andes, and spent their days documenting what they could about the animal and its characteristics and its forest home. Because the olinguito was new to science, it was imperative for the scientists to record every aspect of the animal.

They learned that the olinguito is mostly active at night, is mainly a fruit eater, rarely comes out of the trees and has one baby at a time.

In addition to body features and behavior, the team made special note of the olinguito's cloud forest Andean habitat, which is under heavy pressure of human development. The team estimated that 42 percent of historic olinguito habitat has already been converted to agriculture or urban areas.

The findings have been published in the Aug. 15 issue of the open access journal ZooKeys. ( ANI )

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Publication:Asian News International
Date:Aug 16, 2013
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