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$166 million released for summer jobs.

President Clinton signed the abbreviated "son of stimulus" bill into law, P.L. 103-50, last week releasing more than $166 million to communities for the summer jobs program. These funds have already been made available to communities through local Service Delivery Areas (SDAs) under Title II-B of the Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA).

In addition, the Department of Labor is preparing instructions about how cities can apply for $50 million earmarked for the Youth Fair Chance (YFC) program.

With the one-time summer job funds just approved by Congress, communities will have funding for this summer's program from three sources: The 1993 base allocation, carry-over funds from the 1992 summer program, and the supplemental allocation. Even though the summer is well under way, the Department of Labor has stated it fully expects that "total fund availability will be expended this summer to the maximum extent feasible and that, correspondingly, the maximum number of youth will be served." According to the Department of Labor, communities may transfer up to ten percent of the summer jobs funds to the Title II-C year-round youth program.

Under current law, eligible youth must be between 14-21 years of age and be economically disadvantaged.

Youth Fair Chance Program (YFC)

The YFC program is a targeted, community-based program to provide comprehensive services to youth living in high poverty areas in the cities and rural areas of the nation.

The intent of the YFC program is to provide services through a community-wide planning to focus on youth problems such as dropping out of school, teen pregnancy, drug and gang involvement, lack of employment and training opportunities, lack of sports and recreation opportunities, and the need for family support, child development and health services.

The new law specifies that YFC grants are to be awarded competitively to not more than 25 areas. Communities that desire to participate in YFC must submit an application through the chief elected official that specifies measurable program goals, shows bow the resources of the community will be utilized, provides an assurance that all youth in the target area will have access to services, and provides evidence of support for the application from officials and leaders in the community.

Factors specified in the law for determining YFC awards include: 1) the quality of the proposed project; 2) the goals to be achieved; 3) the likelihood of successful implementation; 4) the extent of community support; 5) other Federal and non-Federal funds available for similar purposes; and 6) additional State, local, or private resources that will be provided. Priority is to be given to communities with the highest poverty rates.

YFC grants will be awarded competitively through a Solicitation for Application or Request for Proposals. Grant applications are not expected to be accepted until sometime in the fall.

The program was authorized by the 1992 JTPA Amendments and is modeled after the Youth Opportunities Unlimited (YOU) demonstrations the Labor Department has funded over the past few years. The $50 million set-aside was proposed by Rep. Maxine Waters (D-Calif.), who represents Los Angeles, one of the YOU grant recipients.

Eligible individuals, who must be between 14 to 30 years old, can reside in urban or rural communities (urban census tracts or nonmetropolitan counties) with populations of not more than 50,000, having the highest concentration of poverty (30 percent or more) based on the latest Bureau of Census estimates; or in migrant or seasonal farmworker communities, native Alaskan villages, or Indian reservations.

The Clinton Administration FY 1994 .Budget requests $25 million for YFC.

Congress did not set aside any funds for the expansion and enrichment of the educational component of the summer jobs program, although the administration continues to strongly support such a component. The administration had originally requested that 30 percent of the supplemental funds be dedicated to academic enrichment.

Another administration-supported proposal that did not make it into the summer jobs supplemental was the ability of private sector employers to provide economically disadvantaged youth with summer employment opportunities. The 1992 JTPA amendments included provisions that would permit subsidizing private employers.
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Author:Quist, Janet
Publication:Nation's Cities Weekly
Date:Jul 12, 1993
Words:673
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