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"Thirst Turns to Desperation in Rural California".

Now in its third year, the state's record-breaking drought is being felt in many ways: vanishing lakes and rivers, lost agricultural jobs, fallowed farmland, rising water bills, suburban yards gone brown. But nowhere is the situation as dire as in East Porterville, a small rural community in Tulare County where life's daily routines have been completely upended by the drying of wells and, in turn, the disappearance of tap water.

"We will give people water as long as we have it, but the truth is, we don't really know how long that will be," said Andrew Lockman, who leads the Tulare County Office of Emergency Services. "We can't offer anyone a long-term solution right now. There is a massive gap between need and resources to deal with it."

Excerpted from "Thirst Turns to Desperation in Rural California," by Jennifer Medina. Read The New York Times complete article here.

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Publication:African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development
Article Type:Excerpt
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Oct 1, 2014
Words:148
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