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WOULD I LIE TO YOU?

Memo to crisis-management teams: Get out the 8x10 glossies of company executives and start sorting. An article in the current issue of the Journal of Consumer Research says the face (literally) a company presents when it's in trouble can make a difference. Dealing with a claim of corporate dishonesty dis·hon·es·ty  
n. pl. dis·hon·es·ties
1. Lack of honesty or integrity; improbity.

2. A dishonest act or statement.

Noun 1.
? Bring out a spokesperson with a baby face (large eyes, small nose, high forehead forehead /fore·head/ (-hed) frons; the part of the face above the eyes.

fore·head
n.
The part of the face between the eyebrows, the normal hairline, and the temples. Also called brow.
, small chin). In experiments with 500 students, researchers found that such a face--unconsciously associated with innocence--helps win people over. Under attack for incompetency The lack of ability, knowledge, legal qualification, or fitness to discharge a required duty or professional obligation.

The term incompetency has several meanings in the law.
 or lack of vigilance VIGILANCE. Proper attention in proper time.
     2. The law requires a man who has a claim to enforce it in proper time, while the adverse party has it in his power to defend himself; and if by his neglect to do so, he cannot afterwards establish such claim, the
? Go with a mature-faced rep to project prudence and wisdom. "If you understand these things, you can send out the right person in the right situation," says Columbia Business School Columbia Business School (part of Columbia University), officially named the Columbia University Graduate School of Business, and also known as CBS, was established in 1916 to provide business training and professional preparation for undergraduate and graduate  marketing professor Gita Johar, one of the study's three authors. Johar cautions, however, that when a crisis is serious, that carefully chosen countenance eventually becomes irrelevant. "After some point, it loses its effectiveness," she acknowledges.
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Author:Michael Orey
Publication:BusinessWeek
Date:Jun 12, 2008
Words:155
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