Printer Friendly

VACCINE MAKER LENDS FULL SUPPORT TO NEW JERSEY RABIES PROBE

 MENDOTA HEIGHTS, Minn., May 19 /PRNewswire/ -- A Minnesota drug company said today it was investigating reports that its rabies vaccine, Rabvac(TM), caused adverse side effects in a few dogs immunized at New Jersey rabies vaccination clinics.
 "We identified a few serials of rabies vaccine where the incidence of reactions was considered to be higher than normal, but we found no problem with the vaccine's potency or effectiveness, nor was there any need to have those dogs re-vaccinated," said Dr. Jerry Quinlan, a veterinarian and Manager of Professional Services for Solvay Animal Health, Inc.
 "This appears to be an isolated problem limited to a few serials of the vaccine to the Jersey area, and most veterinarians and dog owners in the state have not experienced any difficulty with the vaccine."
 Dr. Quinlan emphasized that all rabies vaccines need to pass government testing standards prior to release. "We nevertheless share the concerns New Jersey veterinarians or pet owners may have resulting from these recent reports, and we're taking measures to regain the market's confidence."
 In a recent letter, Solvay advised New Jersey veterinarians of the reports and said it was monitoring the situation with both the state Veterinary Medical Association and Department of Health. Furthermore, Solvay has offered to replace any product in question. "In light of the isolated reports of reactions, we felt that offering to replace product was the prudent and responsible thing to do. There is no need to have pets re-vaccinated," Dr. Quinlan said.
 The veterinarian explained that all vaccines used in veterinary and human medicine have the potential to cause reactions such as swelling or fever within 24 hours of administration, but the incidence is generally low.
 "We were concerned when we heard the reports about Rabvac because this particular rabies vaccine has a very strong safety record," Dr. Quinlan explained. In 1991 and 1992, for example, Solvay Animal Health averaged less than 5 reported reactions per 100,000 doses (0.0045 percent) of Rabvac administered in the United States and Canada, he reported. Moreover, occurrence of reactions to Rabvac in New Jersey -- as reported in a recent communication from the New Jersey Coordinator of Veterinary Product Health -- has been less then one percent. "Of the serials in question, 0.08 percent was the highest reaction rate we saw -- and that is still considered very low," Dr. Quinlan said.
 Solvay Animal Health scientists are working to identify what caused the reported reactions at the state-sponsored community rabies vaccination clinics. The company said it was conducting numerous tests and would report its findings to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which regulates vaccines, the N.J. Department of Health and the N.J. Veterinary Medical Association.
 "Community-sponsored rabies vaccination clinics have made a tremendous contribution to the war against rabies, and we support the continuation of these programs," Dr. Quinlan said. "It's important to note, however, that pets brought to free vaccination clinics cannot always be thoroughly examined. In most cases, it is not advisable to vaccinate an animal that is already under stress from a health problem since reactions are more likely to occur. Pet owners need to keep that in mind and understand that these community vaccination clinics are no substitute for routine veterinary care."
 The N.J. Department of Health has suspended use of Rabvac in state- sponsored veterinary clinics pending results of Solvay's investigation. In a recent letter to its members, the state veterinary medical association said the health department's actions were "solely precautionary in nature, and not intended to recommend against the use of Rabvac."
 Dr. Quinlan added that Rabvac was still considered safe to use. "The probability of veterinarians and pet owners in New Jersey seeing an abnormal rate of reaction is still very low," Dr. Quinlan added, "but we wanted to take a pro-active stance and make them aware of these isolated occurrences."
 Pet owners who suspect any abnormal reactions to rabies vaccination should contact their veterinarian.
 -0- 5/19/93
 /CONTACT: Jerry Quinlan, DVM, or James Walsh, DVM, both of Solvay Animal Health, Inc., 800-524-1645, or 612-681-9555, or Joseph Feeks of Feeks Wilson-East, 914-758-2200, for Solvay Animal Health, Inc./


CO: Solvay Animal Health Inc. ST: Minnesota IN: MTC SU:

LD -- NY098 -- 0543 05/19/93 21:44 EDT
COPYRIGHT 1993 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1993 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:May 19, 1993
Words:709
Previous Article:TEXACO RECOGNIZED FOR SAFETY EXCELLENCE
Next Article:AMSOUTH BANCORPORATION DECLARES DIVIDEND
Topics:


Related Articles
Animals inoculated with baited breath.
DESPITE SETBACKS, CONCERNED VACCINE MAKER PLACES ADS URGING PET OWNERS TO VACCINATE FOR RABIES
USDA APPROVES WISTAR-DEVELOPED ORAL VACCINE TO CONTROL RABIES IN RACCOONS
Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture: Raccoon Rabies Oral Vaccine Project Underway in Western PA; Vaccine Now Being Distributed By Air As Well As...

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters