Printer Friendly

UTILITIES PREPARE FOR ONSET OF SUMMER

UTILITIES PREPARE FOR ONSET OF SUMMER
     TAMPA, Fla., June 15 /PRNewswire/ -- The official start of summer isn't until next week, but Floridians already are experiencing muggy, hot days.  Keeping cool during the summer is a top priority.  Fans and air conditions run full blast, refrigerators work overtime to freeze ice and pool pumps churn.
    That's Florida in the summer and it means people want, need and use more electricity.
    The following background material assesses electricity supply this summer, briefly explains how the Florida electricity shortage plan works, and provides a list of emergency electricity cutback measures consumers can use if necessary.
    Electricity supply is adequate this summer to meet projected demand, according to data accumulated by the Florida Electric Power Coordinating Group, Inc. (FCG), an association of 38 of the state's electric utilities.  This forecast assumes normal weather conditions.
    Florida's electricity demand, however, is particularly weather- sensitive.  For example, if abnormally hot weather persists over a four- or five-day period without typical afternoon thundershowers, heat buildup results.  This makes cooling equipment work harder for longer periods of time to maintain a constant temperature.
    During typical summer weather, heat buildup during the day is moderated by afternoon rainstorms.  Peak electricity use in the summer usually occurs from 4-8 p.m., and afternoon rains can significantly lower electricity demand.
    The peak use of electricity this summer is projected to reach 29,445 megawatts in August.  This peak can be lowered, if necessary, by demand- side programs now in place across the state, resulting in a net summer projected peak of 27,773 megawatts.
    Currently, in-state electric supply available for the summer peak is close to 32,000 megawatts resulting in a reserve margin of approximately 15 percent.  (Reserve margin is the difference between available energy supply resources and peak electricity use.)
    This is similar to last year's summer reserve margin of 18 percent. The difference is attributable to growth in electricity demand and no major generating unit additions.
    No tight electricity supply situations have occurred this year. However, in past years, Florida's electric utilities have had to alert consumers to possible electricity shortages caused by unseasonable weather coupled with the unavailability of some generating units.
    In the event of supply problems, utilities will activate the state generating capacity shortage plan.  The success of this plan depends on consumer involvement.  During tight supply situations, Florida's electric utilities will ask the news media to make public appeals to consumers asking them to reduce electricity use.  Consumers can help by responding to utility requests for emergency cutback of electricity consumption particularly during peak times of 4-8 p.m.
                              SUMMER TIPS
         HOW TO CUT BACK YOUR ELECTRICITY USE DURING SHORTAGES
   -- Raise the thermostat setting for your air conditioner 5-10
      degrees, if health permits.  Keep the temperature readings
      constant until you are notified that the energy shortage has
      passed.
    -- Turn off electric water heaters at the circuit breaker.
    -- Close curtains and blinds to help insulate your home and building
       against cooling loss.
    -- Avoid using room air conditioners.  Turn them off when you leave
       the room or your house.
    -- Keep cooking and bathing to a minimum, especially during the late
       afternoon and early evening hours.
    -- Reduce use of major appliances, such as dishwashers and clothes
       dryers.
    -- Turn off all nonessential lighting and electric appliances such
       as pool pumps and sprinkler systems.
    -- Leave refrigerator and freezer doors closed as much as possible.
    -- If someone in your home is dependent on electric powered, life-
       sustaining medical equipment, check backup facilities.
    -- If you experience a power outage, turn of all major appliances,
       including the air conditioner, immediately following the service
       interruption.  This will prevent the system serving your home
       from being overloaded when power is restored.  When power is
       restored, turn appliances on gradually and only as needed.
    -- Wait 30 minutes to one hour before calling your utility service
       for assistance if you experience a power outage.  Do not call
       911.  This will help keep phone lines open for calls on equipment
       problems unrelated to utility initiated rolling blackouts.
               THE GENERATING CAPACITY SHORTAGE PLAN
    The Generating Capacity Shortage Plan has four stages.
    STAGE I -- GENERATING CAPACITY ADVISORY
    An advisory is similar to a hurricane watch.  It is intended to give early warning of potential electricity shortfalls and bring utilities, emergency management officials, the governor and the Public Service Commission to a state of readiness.
    STAGE II -- GENERATING CAPACITY ALERT
    An Alert is based on reserve margin -- the difference between available statewide resources and the amount of peak electric demand projected for that day.  When the reserves fall below the size of the largest generating unit in the state (currently around 900 megawatts), an Alert is called.
    STAGE III -- GENERATING CAPACITY EMERGENCY
    An Emergency occurs when firm load is lost, or in other words, blackouts are inevitable somewhere in Florida.  Rolling blackouts, manually activated by utilities, are a last resort to avoid system overload and possible equipment damage.  Without them, the electric system could experience an automatic shutdown that would result in more widespread and longer blackouts.  By the time rolling blackouts are used, utilities would have exhausted every available means to balance supply and demand.
    STAGE IV -- SYSTEM LOAD RESTORATION
    This is the last stage of the plan and is instituted when rolling blackouts have been terminated and power supply is adequate.  It is the recovery stage and concerted efforts are made to provide frequent system status reports.
    -0-             06/15/92
    CONTACT:  Ron Spinka of the Florida Electric Power Coordinating Group, 813-289-5644 CO:  FLORIDA ELECTRIC POWER COORDINATING GROUP, INC. IN:  UTI ST:  FL -- FL009 -- X597  06/15/92
COPYRIGHT 1992 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Jun 15, 1992
Words:928
Previous Article:MOODY'S RELEASES POLICY STATEMENT ON AIRPORT PASSENGER FACILITY CHARGES; 'STAND ALONE' PFC DEBT UNLIKELY TO ACHIEVE INVESTMENT GRADE RATING
Next Article:PACIFIC BELL TO TEST SIEMENS STROMBERG-CARLSON EWSM CELL SWITCHING SYSTEM IN SMDS APPLICATIONS
Topics:


Related Articles
GREEN MOUNTAIN POWER'S ANNUAL REPORT WINS TOP NATIONAL AWARD
CELLNET'S WIRELESS DATA NETWORK CHOSEN BY GEORGIA POWER COMPANY; WILL AUTOMATE 1996 ATLANTA OLYMPICS
NEPOOL: POWER SUPPLIES MAY BE TIGHT IN NEW ENGLAND THIS SUMMER
ELECTRIC UTILITIES GIRD FOR DEREGULATION
Energy Department, Local Officials Explore Reliability of Electricity Under Deregulation.
SCE, Thermo Ecotek Reach Accord That Will Add Much-Needed Power to California Grid.
FirstEnergy is front-runner.
DWP BETTER PREPARED FOR SUMMER HEAT WAVE.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2016 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters