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UMWA LAUNCHES STRATEGIC, SELECTIVE STRIKES; COAL COMPANIES TARGETED BECAUSE OF OPERATORS' REFUSAL TO BARGAIN IN GOOD FAITH

 WASHINGTON, May 10 /PRNewswire/ -- The United Mine Workers of America (UMWA), protesting unfair labor practices, announced strategic, selective strikes beginning today at Ziegler Coal Holding Company, Arch Mineral Corporation and Amax, Inc. The strikes were called after months of stalled negotiations and a 60-day contract extension during which the member companies represented by the Bituminous Coal Operators Association (BCOA) repeatedly refused to bargain in good faith with the union.
 "The coal operators' refusal to bargain in good faith has left us no choice but to take this action," said UMWA President Richard Trumka.
 "We are fighting for good jobs for the future," Trumka said. "We are simply asking that when the coal companies use profits generated by our increased productivity to open new mines, that UMWA members get a fair share of the new jobs they helped create through their hard work. Those jobs are essential to our families, our communities, to a strong and competitive coal industry and to America's economic well-being."
 Thousands of coal miners face unemployment over the next 10 years as the coal supply in mines where UMWA members work is exhausted. That supply is being depleted even more quickly because of increased productivity on the part of union miners.
 "The coal operators have billions of tons of coal reserves sitting in the ground. We want to make sure our members -- the most productive miners in the world -- mine that coal," explained Trumka.
 "But, the coal operators are playing a shell game. They're closing union mines and laying off UMWA members and then opening new mines and hiring non-union workers under different corporate names to try to hide real ownership and avoid their obligation to honor their agreements with the UMWA."
 Trumka said the creation of non-union subsidiaries by coal operators for the purpose of undercutting the contractual rights of workers is an unfair labor practice. The union is also charging other unfair labor practices


including the refusal to provide the UMWA with information needed by the union to engage in contract negotiations. The information is needed, Trumka said, if the union is to negotiate job opportunity guarantees for its members.
 "Coal exports are up, and demand is up. It is the work of our members that has increased productivity, increased profits and helped the American coal industry compete in the global economy," Trumka said. "The members of the UMWA have earned the right to jobs they helped create, the right to quality health care and a secure retirement."
 The coal industry is at a crossroads and labor/management relations are at a critical turning point. Trumka explained, "Our union has demonstrated its willingness to change, to help the industry improve, grow and compete, and we are willing to help the industry become even more productive -- if the industry is willing to work with the union and respect our members.
 "The coal operators are stuck in the short-sighted, autocratic management practices of the past," Trumka said. "In this new, more competitive world, it is more important than ever that we have enlightened labor/management relations based on mutual respect and an understanding that only by working together can we all win."
 Trumka explained: "We didn't want a conflict, but the BCOA- represented companies have left us no choice. Our members support this strike. As always, we are disciplined and united in our resolve. We hope that this action will help bring the operators back to their senses and that our members will soon be back on the job. But we will use every legal means at our command to win justice for our members, their families and their communities."
 "The action taken by the UMWA today is the first in a phased expansion that will continue until the BCOA-represented companies agree to provide our members with what they have earned -- jobs with a future," Trumka said.
 The National Bituminous Coal Wage Agreement of 1988, which was negotiated between the UMWA and BCOA, covers more than 60,000 workers nationwide. Today's action does not affect companies affiliated with the Independent Bituminous Coal Bargaining Alliance (IBCBA). The union's agreement with IBCBA has been extended through June 30, 1993.
 CORPORATE PROFILES
 AMAX, Inc.
 With 1991 operating profits of $113 million, Amax, Inc., is the third largest U.S. coal producer. Based in New York, Amax is also the world's largest producer of molybdenum and third largest producer of aluminum. However, coal earnings represented 57 percent of total earnings for 1991 for Amax, Inc.
 Amax Coal's major utility customers include Central Illinois Public Service, Public Service of Indiana, Southern Indiana Gas & Electric, Indianapolis Power & Light, Indiana-Michigan Electric, Hoosier Rural Electric Cooperative, Oklahoma Gas & Electric and Ohio Edison. The chairman and CEO of Amax, Inc., is Allen Born. The president and CEO of Amax Energy, Inc., is Thomas McKeever. Douglas Ashby is president and CEO of Amax Coal.
 ZIEGLER COAL HOLDING CO.
 Ziegler is based in Fairview Heights, Ill. Considered one of the most profitable coal companies in the United States, Ziegler had estimated profits of $40 million on sales of $440 million in 1991.
 In 1992, Ziegler Coal Holding purchased Shell Mining Co. from Shell Oil to become the fourth largest coal company in America. Ziegler's major utility customers include Georgia Power, PSI Energy, Southern Indiana Gas & Electric, Tampa Electric, the Tennessee Valley Authority, Carolina Power and Light, Cajun Electric Power, Union Electric and Farmer's Electric Cooperative.
 The chairman and CEO of Ziegler Coal Holding Co. is Michael Reilly. Ziegler's president and COO is Chand Vyas.
 ARCH MINERAL CORP.
 The St. Louis-based Arch Mineral Corp. is a 50/50 joint venture between Ashland Oil, Inc., and the Hunt brothers of Texas. Arch is the nation's 10th largest coal producer and earned gross profits of $31 million on sales of $582 million for the first three quarters of 1992. In 1991 Arch contributed 14.85 percent of Ashland Oil's $64 million net income.
 Arch Mineral's major utility customers include Baltimore Gas & Electric, Cardinal Operating Co., Cincinnati Gas & Electric, Dayton Power & Light, Detroit Edison, Georgia Power, East Kentucky Power Cooperative, Illinois Power and Iowa Public Service. The president and CEO of Arch Mineral is Stephen Leer. The chairman and CEO of Ashland Oil, Inc., is John Hall.
 -0- 5/10/93
 /CONTACT: Jim Grossfeld of the United Mine Workers of America, 202-842-7240/


CO: United Mine Workers of America; Amax, Inc.; Ziegler Coal Holding
 Co.; Arch Mineral Corp. ST: District of Columbia IN: MNG SU:


DC-TW -- DC026 -- 6536 05/10/93 14:03 EDT
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Date:May 10, 1993
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