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UCLA, USC TO GET HUGE DONATIONS; MANN TO GIVE EACH SCHOOL $100 MILLION.



Byline: Daily News Staff and Wire Services

Alfred Mann, a pioneer of Los Angeles' biomedicine biomedicine /bio·med·i·cine/ (bi?o-med´i-sin) clinical medicine based on the principles of the natural sciences (biology, biochemistry, etc.).biomed´ical

bi·o·med·i·cine
n.
1.
 industry and founder of three Sylmar-based health-care firms, said Wednesday he will donate $100 million each to USC An abbreviation for U.S. Code.  and UCLA UCLA University of California at Los Angeles
UCLA University Center for Learning Assistance (Illinois State University)
UCLA University of Carrollton, TX and Lower Addison, TX
 for the schools to establish biomedical research Biomedical research (or experimental medicine), in general simply known as medical research, is the basic research or applied research conducted to aid the body of knowledge in the field of medicine.  centers.

Together, the donations would be among the six largest ever made to higher education.

Mann, 72, said he is making the donations as a way to ``give something back to society'' and that he plans to give away most of his estate rather than leave it to his six children. ``I don't want them to have enough money to sit around and do nothing,'' he said.

Mann said the nonprofit University of Southern California The U.S. News & World Report ranked USC 27th among all universities in the United States in its 2008 ranking of "America's Best Colleges", also designating it as one of the "most selective universities" for admitting 8,634 of the almost 34,000 who applied for freshman admission  institute will work to develop medical devices such as computer chips that can replace damaged nerve cells. The institute will be based in a four-story building to be built on the downtown campus that also will house the university's biomedical engineering Biomedical engineering

An interdisciplinary field in which the principles, laws, and techniques of engineering, physics, chemistry, and other physical sciences are applied to facilitate progress in medicine, biology, and other life sciences.
 department.

Details of the center at the University of California, Los Angeles UCLA comprises the College of Letters and Science (the primary undergraduate college), seven professional schools, and five professional Health Science schools. Since 2001, UCLA has enrolled over 33,000 total students, and that number is steadily rising. , have yet to be worked out, Mann said.

``These gifts are great in the sense that's they're a necessary link between basic science and commercialization,'' said Ahmen Enany, executive director of the Southern California Biomedical bi·o·med·i·cal
adj.
1. Of or relating to biomedicine.

2. Of, relating to, or involving biological, medical, and physical sciences.
 Council. ``It can also help add jobs to the region.''

Enany said Mann originally planned to give money solely to UCLA, but that when USC got wind of the deal it swooped in and offered to move faster than the state-run UCLA in getting a center up and running.

Enany said Mann first approached UCLA a decade ago about an endowment, but the school was unprepared at the time for such a center.

``This new institute creates an extraordinary opportunity for USC and for Southern California,'' said USC President Steven Sample. ``Speaking as an engineer who has been in industry as well as academe, I can say that nothing spurs the creative process as much as the prospect of bettering people's lives and improving society as a whole.''

Mann, an Oregon native who graduated from UCLA with bachelor's and master's degrees in physics, has founded seven biomedical and electronics firms over the past 30 years - five in Los Angeles County - including Sylmar-based MiniMed Inc., which produces insulin infusion pumps for diabetics; Advanced Bionics Corp., the only U.S. firm with an implant for the profoundly deaf; and Pacesetter Inc., a leader in the field of cardiac pacemakers.

Mann said that based on the success of his companies, he might fund more centers in years to come. ``If my companies continue to do as well as they are, I could do more,'' he said.

Mann helped jump-start Los Angeles' biomedicine industry in the 1960s when, while working as a satellite battery designer, he decided the same technology could be used to build long-lasting batteries for pacemakers.

Now chairman of the Southern California Biomedical Council, Mann has been a vocal advocate of Los Angeles as a potential hub for the industry, though he has criticized the city for being too bureaucratic.

Mann said he hopes the new institutes will spur development of biotechnology companies in Los Angeles, which he said lag behind the industry hubs in the San Francisco Bay Area “Bay Area” redirects here. For other uses, see Bay Area (disambiguation).

The San Francisco Bay Area, colloquially known as the Bay Area or The Bay
 and San Diego.

Giving two such large donations to universities is highly unusual, although Walter Annenberg gave $120 million each to USC and the University of Pennsylvania (body, education) University of Pennsylvania - The home of ENIAC and Machiavelli.

http://upenn.edu/.

Address: Philadelphia, PA, USA.
 in 1993.

The Mann endowment for UCLA is the latest example of relatively rare major philanthropic gifts to public universities. The largest gift to a public university before Mann's was the $100 million donated in 1992 by entrepreneur Henry Rowan and his wife, Betty, to Glassboro State College in New Jersey, which was renamed Rowan College.

Public institutions say they need gifts of this size to make up for the loss of state financing.

Mann said he drew his initial inspiration from the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, which was formed in 1981 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Massachusetts Institute of Technology, at Cambridge; coeducational; chartered 1861, opened 1865 in Boston, moved 1916. It has long been recognized as an outstanding technological institute and its Sloan School of Management has notable programs in business,  based on a gift from Edwin Whitehead, another medical-device entrepreneur.

At the time, the plan raised concern at MIT MIT - Massachusetts Institute of Technology  about whether the university would lose control of its faculty appointments and research agenda to business. That prompted Whitehead to say a few years later, ``It's easier to make $100 million than to give it away.''

University ties with business have become more common since then, and Mann had no such trouble giving his money away.

Mann said his companies would not have preferential access to any technology developed at the institute. But he will be the chairman of the institute's board, and therefore will be in a good position to see what is coming and to help set the research agenda.

CAPTION(S):

Photo

PHOTO Alfred Mann, chairman and CEO (1) (Chief Executive Officer) The highest individual in command of an organization. Typically the president of the company, the CEO reports to the Chairman of the Board.  of MiniMed in Sylmar, will donate $100 million each to USC and UCLA.

Phil McCarten/Daily News
COPYRIGHT 1998 Daily News
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1998, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

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Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Date:Feb 5, 1998
Words:807
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