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U.S. EPA BEGINS SUPERFUND CLEANUP AT CHARLESTON DRMO SITE

 SAN FRANCISCO, July 22 /PRNewswire/ -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) today announced it is taking charge of the removal and disposal of compressed gas cylinders, containers of chlordane and DDT, and drums of unknown hazardous materials and other potentially hazardous substances at the Charleston site, 6274 E. Charleston Blvd., Las Vegas, Nev.
 "Until these hazardous substances are removed, they pose a potential threat to anyone who might come in contact with their contents," said Jeff Zelikson, director of hazardous waste management for U.S. EPA's western region. "U.S. EPA's Superfund emergency response program has the capability to get this job done safely and efficiently."
 A complaint about the site was first made in 1992 to the Clark County Fire Department which inspected the site and found numerous violations in the storage of hazardous materials and substances. At the request of the Nevada Department of Environment Protection, U.S. EPA assessed the site in April 1993 and determined that the site posed a risk to the public health, welfare and the environment.
 U.S. EPA sent letters to all past and current owners, the United States Air Force (Nellis Air Force Base), and the Defense Revitalization Marketing Office notifying them that they are responsible for cleaning up the hazardous materials. The U.S. Air Force and the DRMS had generated a portion of the waste and sold it to the past owners.
 On June 30, 1993, U.S. EPA issued an administrative order to the former and current owners requiring them to perform cleanup actions. The owners complied with the order until July 19, 1993, when they said they were no longer financially able to perform the cleanup. U.S. EPA then took charge of the removal.
 This removal action is authorized under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (Superfund). Since 1980, U.S. EPA has completed over 2,700 emergency response actions. The Superfund emergency response program deals with imminent threats to human health and the environment. These situations range from acute, life-threatening hazardous substance spills to complex situations involving improper management of hazardous waste.
 -0- 7/22/93
 /CONTACT: Paula Bruin of U.S. EPA, 415-744-1587/


CO: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ST: Nevada IN: ENV SU: EXE

TM -- SF007 -- 4833 07/22/93 17:46 EDT
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Date:Jul 22, 1993
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