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U.S. EPA, DYNAMAC SETTLE COMPLAINT INVOLVING ASBESTOS IN SCHOOLS

U.S. EPA, DYNAMAC SETTLE COMPLAINT INVOLVING ASBESTOS IN SCHOOLS
 SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 22 /PRNewswire/ --The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) today announced a consent agreement with Dynamac Corp., Rockville, Md., settling allegations that the company violated provisions of the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) when performing inspections and developing management plans for asbestos at six California school districts.
 As part of the settlement, Dynamac will pay a civil penalty of $53,600. In addition, the company will revisit more than 600 public schools in California to identify and remedy any deficiencies in existing Dynamac inspection records or management plans. The cost of revisiting the schools and correcting problems is estimated at more than $1.1 million.
 The consent agreement settles two complaints brought by U.S. EPA against Dynamac in March and October of 1991. In the first, the agency cited Dynamac for failure to provide Carmel Unified School District with inspection results within 30 days and failure to properly inspect and sample at Montebello School District. The second complaint cited Dynamac for failure to properly inspect and sample at Palos Verdes Peninsula Unified School District, Lennox School District, Lawndale School District and Manhattan Beach City School District.
 AHERA was passed by Congress in 1986 to protect school children and school employees from exposure to asbestos. It requires public school districts and private nonprofit schools to inspect all school buildings for both friable and nonfriable asbestos; to develop plans to manage asbestos that exists in the school; and to carry out the plans in a timely fashion. Schools often hire accredited contractors such as Dynamac to perform inspections and develop management plans.
 Asbestos regulations are intended to keep asbestos fibers out of the ambient air because no safe exposure level to airborne asbestos fibers is known. When inhaled, asbestos can cause lung cancer and mesothelioma, a cancer of the chest and abdominal cavity. During renovation or demolition projects involving asbestos-containing building materials, asbestos fibers can become airborne for considerable periods of time if materials are not wetted down or packaged correctly.
 -0- 10/22/92
 /CONTACT: Bill Glenn of the U.S. EPA, 415-744-1589/ CO: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Dynamac Corp. ST: California, Maryland IN: SU: EXE


TM -- SF009 -- 3661 10/22/92 13:26 EDT
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Date:Oct 22, 1992
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